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Lee Factory Crimp Die 9mm


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After adjusting the Die via Lee’s instructions. I ran several rounds that failed my case gauge. I noticed some just had a polished ring where the round was and the base. Some rounds had a line at the base. Some the line was flat others the line had bit of a lip. Typically the rounds with polished ring and line with no lip passes the case gauge. The ones with the lip failed worse then before.

 

I am more concerned with function then looks but if the case is compromised at the line then I want to know.

 

I use a Dillion 1050 with Dillon dies

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Edited by brisix
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It's basically resizing a case that probably expanded in an overly large chamber.  It can't accomplish the same as a pass - thru die as the die is precluded from going any further down the case by the fact that the unsized portion is in the shell holder portion of the press.

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Case lube? They look dry. Lube will virtually eliminate that. And as an FYI I like to run mine as just a crimp die so I don't run it down very far.

I use One Shot case lube.


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It's basically resizing a case that probably expanded in an overly large chamber.  It can't accomplish the same as a pass - thru die as the die is precluded from going any further down the case by the fact that the unsized portion is in the shell holder portion of the press.

Are they safe to shoot?


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get a lee sizing die. lube with lanolin instead of the one shot.  use the FCD as crimp die not an assurance die.   so use your seating to seat only and do the final crimp with the FCD.  

 

the lee sizes farther down. Dillion dies has always been interesting in that they leave such a hourglass shape.  i think that brass came from a very generous chamber .   i both lanolin and one shot and find the lanolin works better.  throw the finished round in corncob and tumble the lube off.  

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Yes, they are safe to shoot.  If you have problems with some not "plunking" I'd follow the advice of Sandbagger and replace the FCD with a standard Lee sizing die.  The difference between the Lee and Dillion dies is that Dillion's have a more generous taper at the entrance which keeps them from sizing as far down the case as the Lee's.  Dillon case lube is Lanolin - you can use theirs or make your own.  One popular formula is a 10 to 1 mix of Lanolin and Rubbing Alcohol.  One popular place to get the Lanolin is Amazon.

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Thanks for the advice. I was thinking of getting a Lee u-Die vs a standard Lee size Die.

 

Any disadvantages to the u-die?

 

I have used the Redding 9mm competition Pro series 3 die set on my Dillon 550. I stopped using the size die and went back to the dillon because the case kept impacting base of the die instead of going in. Have you run into that same problem with the Lee dies.

 

 

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22 minutes ago, brisix said:

Thanks for the advice. I was thinking of getting a Lee u-Die vs a standard Lee size Die.

 

Any disadvantages to the u-die?

 

I have used the Redding 9mm competition Pro series 3 die set on my Dillon 550. I stopped using the size die and went back to the dillon because the case kept impacting base of the die instead of going in. Have you run into that same problem with the Lee dies.

 

 

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Lots of folks use the U-Die, I don't now but might setup a processing tool head with one.  Currently I use a Lee Decap/Sizing die on a 650.  Maybe 1 out of 1,000 won't go in properly to the die but I've found that it is often my issue with short stroking the push/primer seat motion resulting in the case slightly out of place. I wouldn't be worried about it.

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I spoke with Lee this morning. The line at the base is due to the FCD doing to much. This is caused by your sizing Die being out of spec and not sizing enough. Since I was using a Dillion die she recommend I get the standard Lee sizing Die. She only recommends the the U-Die if your rounds are not chambering with the standard die. She also mentioned the line is cosmetic and should not effect function as long as they chamber.


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2 hours ago, brisix said:

I spoke with Lee this morning. The line at the base is due to the FCD doing to much. This is caused by your sizing Die being out of spec and not sizing enough. Since I was using a Dillion die she recommend I get the standard Lee sizing Die. She only recommends the the U-Die if your rounds are not chambering with the standard die. She also mentioned the line is cosmetic and should not effect function as long as they chamber.


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"She" was pretty honest but not 100% correct. Sizing die could just not be adjusted low enough as opposed to out of spec. BUT, I also had problems with Dillon die not sizing enough and run Udie exclusively. AND, udies are also used to prevent bullet setback not just help with chambering. In my opinion LEE dies are better than Dillon and they are way cheaper. I have a LEE standard die that also seemed to prevent bullet setback but I just stuck with the udie. Regardless of the die you wind up with, make sure it is just kissing the shell plate, not backed off like recommended. And get some Dillon lube or make your own.

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"She" was pretty honest but not 100% correct. Sizing die could just not be adjusted low enough as opposed to out of spec. BUT, I also had problems with Dillon die not sizing enough and run Udie exclusively. AND, udies are also used to prevent bullet setback not just help with chambering. In my opinion LEE dies are better than Dillon and they are way cheaper. I have a LEE standard die that also seemed to prevent bullet setback but I just stuck with the udie. Regardless of the die you wind up with, make sure it is just kissing the shell plate, not backed off like recommended. And get some Dillon lube or make your own.
I may be missing something. How does a crimp die leave a ring that far down the case? All you are doing is removing the flair for seating.

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Just now, XB40 said:

I may be missing something. How does a crimp die leave a ring that far down the case? All you are doing is removing the flair for seating.

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LEE FCD sizes and crimps if adjust d to do so. Google LEE FCD

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16 hours ago, Sarge said:

Case lube? They look dry. Lube will virtually eliminate that. And as an FYI I like to run mine as just a crimp die so I don't run it down very far.

 

It is absolutely amazing what a small amount of lube (I use dillon case lube) will do for easing your reloading process, Sarge is spot on!

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 12/29/2017 at 3:47 PM, Adam B said:

 

It is absolutely amazing what a small amount of lube (I use dillon case lube) will do for easing your reloading process, Sarge is spot on!

Case lube is for woossies!  LOL I'm not a fan of the FCD, a good set of Hornady or Dillon dies is way better.   But yes case lube makes it faster and easier, I just shoot a little one shot in the case feeder and I can tell the difference.  

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On ‎12‎/‎29‎/‎2017 at 4:47 PM, Adam B said:

 

It is absolutely amazing what a small amount of lube (I use dillon case lube) will do for easing your reloading process, Sarge is spot on!

I also get more consistent OAL's with the lube.

Run a batch of dry cases, then run a batch of lubed cases.  You'll never load dry cases again.

I also make my own lube with Lanolin and high concentrate alcohol.

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On 12/29/2017 at 10:38 AM, brisix said:

I spoke with Lee this morning. The line at the base is due to the FCD doing to much. This is caused by your sizing Die being out of spec and not sizing enough. Since I was using a Dillion die she recommend I get the standard Lee sizing Die. She only recommends the the U-Die if your rounds are not chambering with the standard die. She also mentioned the line is cosmetic and should not effect function as long as they chamber.

 

I’ve run various combinations of U die, Redding dies, Dillon dies...

 

I recommend a non-U Lee die at the beginning, the Lee FCD at the end, and either a redding micrometer or a Dillon seating die.

 

This combination along with ensuring you don’t seat bullets past .300” into the case (i.e. heavy bullets loaded very short) will result in minimal effort to cycle the handle along with really high case gauge percentages.

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FWIW, my Lee U-die does this also (no FCD). It's because the chamber is fat. Even if run through a Dillon sizer, then Lee U-die, it still does it.

 

If I roll size the brass first, it doesn't happen.

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I have my new setup on my 1050. I switched out the following Dillon dies; Lee Sizer, Hornady Seating, and LEE FCD dies.  I loaded 1k and chamber checked 600.  The new combo nearly eliminated the polish marks and line at the base of the brass.  Out of 600 I had 4 fail chamber check, .00666 fail rate.  1 of the 4 had a burr on the rim that caused it to fail.  2 of 4 had a very prominent line at the base that caused them to fail.  

 

I did initially notice slightly more effort operating the handle of the 1050 but not enough to count that as negative.   I added more One Shot lube to the ziploc bag on the next batch and that reduced it further, still more then with Dillon dies but that is to be expected.

 

I also like the decapping pin on the Lee die better then the Dillon.  Sometimes either due to the Dillon decapping pin being slightly bent or the round not that having perfect alignment.  The Dillon pin would not clear the flash hole and I would have to stop operation to straighten the pin, realign brass or chunk the brass in question.  I did not run into any of that with the Lee.  I would also have primers not fully eject with the Dillon die, usually 2-4 per 100.  The Lee had zero failures to eject.   In general the Lee pin seems more robust, no more breaking the retaining clip on the Dillon.  Not a big deal just a PIA, especially when you realized you have no more backups.      

 

We will see how things go after 20k+ rounds but I am optimistic.  

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 1/17/2018 at 4:05 PM, brisix said:

In general the Lee pin seems more robust, no more breaking the retaining clip on the Dillon.  Not a big deal just a PIA, especially when you realized you have no more backups.     

 

There are some really robust aftermarket Lee decapping pins.

 

http://www.squirreldaddy.com/category-s/336.htm

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7 hours ago, Sarge said:

If LEE pins are tightened properly they should push out before bending.

 

I deal with a lot of very tight primers. Dillon won't push them out, but if I tighten down the Lee decapping pin it will push them out. I am still on my original Lee decapping pin, but I keep the hardened decapping pins in stock just in case.

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