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I know a guy who has a professional drone.  His wife uses it for her real estate business  The drone uses GPS stabilization and his phone hooks into the controller pad.  I've seen him use it at Level 2 matches before.  I see no issues with drone coverage at a match.  The drone should be flown behind or above the shooter.  

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9 minutes ago, stick said:

I know a guy who has a professional drone.  His wife uses it for her real estate business  The drone uses GPS stabilization and his phone hooks into the controller pad.  I've seen him use it at Level 2 matches before.  I see no issues with drone coverage at a match.  The drone should be flown behind or above the shooter.  

They bother me if they get too close even if behind/above. Too much noise personally. Especially when muffs are turned up.

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Hmm, if the person with the drone gets a video of somebody heeding the call of nature at a match when they think they are being discreet I guess they can make that public if they want to?

 

 

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I don't see a problem with them as long as they stay out of the line of sight of the shooter running a stage.  I can't imagine the noise being a problem considering all the noise we are making shooting guns.

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Two no’s for me under the following conditions:

 

1. If the noise is loud enough to mess with electonic muffs, as in it permanently shuts them off turning them into passives.  I see this as a safety issue. 

 

2. If it’s in an anti 2A state.  The last thing I need is to be even more paranoid about who the big brother is that is tracking me and my equipment.  Even if it’s a fellow competitor with totally noble intentions, depending on the day I will pack my bags and go home.  Many of my fellow shooters will do the same.  If this seems too paranoid to the reader, then I say congratulations to you for living in a place where gun ownership and use is tantamount to civil disobedience.  

 

If the above two criteria are non-issues, then go for it.  

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59 minutes ago, jkrispies said:

If it’s in an anti 2A state.

 

I know what you are saying, but there are likely anti 2a groups in every state (at a match I attended last year in a very pro 2a state some fine citizen got up early and spread a few pounds of nails across the range entrance road) so it is playing the odds wherever you are at. 

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I'm a photographer but photographing at less than notable club matches can result in a lot of cold stares and evil eyes. Lots of people in law enforcement and the military don't want their photos circulated. Even the fuddy sporting clays guys are reluctant. Regardless of the terms and conditions. At "big" events people expect to be photographed and they let it slide. Cowboy action shooters like to show off too. 

 

Seems that to get decent images you have to get your drone in the proximity of the shooter. Not unsafely so but if you can't see expressions and details then it's pretty boring. And if you're that close you should get direct, personal permission or back off because they're not go to cooperate anyway. 

 

Even my little Mavic Pro (bottom of the line for acceptable footage) has props spinning powerfully enough to send you to the hospital without an eye or finger so be careful.  

 

Come to think of it a good rule of thumb might be if the shooter is wearing a shirt full of logos then they're fair game but if they're in a old T-shirt never mind? 

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The main problem with drone footage is they don't record sound, so you have to be techy enough to use a video camera on the stage and merge the two files.  I have no idea how to do that.  There other issue besides all the paranoia mentioned above, is that the FAA prohibits anyone flying a drone directly above people.  So, at a match where there are lots of people spread out in and around the bays, it would be very difficult not to fly directly above someone.

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3 hours ago, RangerTrace said:

The main problem with drone footage is they don't record sound, so you have to be techy enough to use a video camera on the stage and merge the two files.  I have no idea how to do that.  There other issue besides all the paranoia mentioned above, is that the FAA prohibits anyone flying a drone directly above people.  So, at a match where there are lots of people spread out in and around the bays, it would be very difficult not to fly directly above someone.

I recently had this discussion about using drones to record game film at high school football games.  I didn’t verify it, but I was told that they’ve been banned at college games for safety reasons.  That’s why cameras on cables are still so prevalent on televised sporting events.  

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I believe recent, or near future, regulations prohibit flying drones over crowds. In many places they do, anyway.

 

If you do it,

- know applicable regulations

- learn to handle that drone

- get Match organizers approval

- get approval from people who can be identified in your footage.

 

Here's a video edit, with drone footage mixed into it. It is a Finnish reservist contest. All personal gear is privately owned. There's a separate class for people who carry a realistic combat load....

 

 

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21 hours ago, xtian999 said:

If you use someone’s photo, you should get a talent release.

 

The photographer (creator) owns the copyright unless they've signed it away (usually to a big corporate employer like Getty). This is how a photographer (attempts to) makes money. 

 

If the photo is for news, art, personal, or education then it is fair for the photographer to use and distribute to others with the same purpose.

 

The second the image is sold or used for advertising, public relations or commercial use there needs to be a property and model release. For instance if I go to Thunder Ranch and photograph Clint, I can shoot all day for my own jollies and the art gallery. But if I sell it to Remington for an ad, there needs to be a release. 

 

Of course we're talking about people with guns, it pays to be polite in all such matters. I'm not messing with Clint without getting his OK first whatever the purpose. 

 

~~~

 

For adding sound you can get a small microphone and recorder that attaches discretely and captures better sound quality than off the cameras. Then in your editing software (Final Cut or Premiere) you can add the sound tracks and sync them up with the action from multiple camera sources. 

 

On my low end Mavic it will record the sound from the controller location (where your phone is) rather than from the whirling drone (which is worthless). 

 

~~~

 

Here's world champion skier Marcel Herscher narrowly avoiding a large professional drone crashing too close for comfort. I saw this on TV watching the race, bizarre. 

 

drone-skier.jpg

Edited by Frankly

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Well, if it’s legal for a photographer to shoot me with a drone, it should be ok for me to shoot his drone. Sounds fair, right?

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Personally I don’t think that drones are a good fit in this sport; The overhead view is not going to show the competitors face and with the berms so close together it may cause a distraction to competitors shooting elsewhere.

 

I can see the benefit for sports that cover large distances such as skiing where the drone can follow behind, you can’t see the competitors face anyway due to the helmets.

 

For USPSA events, I think a series of small video cameras placed around a few key stages may work better. If they were all synced together then editing would not be too much of a chore, but it wouldn’t be much use for a live coverage option.

 

With regard to photographing competitors at major events, it’s acceptable as long as the land owner says so. But as pointed out above, if an image is sold to promote a product then you need permission from the subject.  USPSA recently published their policy statement on photographs, on the Minutes page of the USPSA web site.

 

I only ever gave my photos to the competitors or to their sponsors, and the only images I sold were to Front Sight.

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The range is public, you have no reasonable expectation of privacy.

 

I vote no only because everytime someone has flown a drone while I've been shooting the rise and fall in sound from the props as they move it around are really annoying. If the noise was constant I could handle it, but no one loiters a drone in one place on station for the whole 6 hours of the match.

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Yeah agreed plus they are not that easy to fly well without a lot of skill and practice. The skiing footage from drones is great but immediately after that crash their governing body banned even the best most professional drone companies, it's a dead issue.

 

And I would probably want to shoot one down if it flew over my property and was spying/annoying. 

 

BUT they are pretty amazing if you're doing something creative with them. Seems to me that if you took top level shooters and staged a production, with a script and retakes so you could get it perfect... and fly the drone along a predetermined path of the shooter then you could make a really fantastic video. 

 

But not during an actual competition. 

 

 

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Necro post.

 

Anybody look at putting the camera portion of a drone on a pole downrange of the shooter to get video without worrying about a drone crashing or the noise? If they put it on a side berm they could get shots from 2 bays. Sure you can't get every stage, but pick some good ones and switch it up during lunch or at the end of the shooting day.

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With regards to drones in IPSC, rule 8.6.6 states:

" Drones or other remotely controlled devices are prohibited unless their use is approved in advance by the Match Director "

 

Still, I doubt anyone would object to someone filming themselves with a drone if it were a local, club match. Of course, there is always a risk the drone could be damaged by ricochets so it's a risk they'd have to accept.

 

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Posted (edited)

I don't think USPSA rules have anything to say about drones.

 

IPSC rule is as it is: MD approval is required. Follow the rules or it is not IPSC. Even a club Match has a MD: the guy who runs it.

 

Privacy laws and politeness might require permission from those who will be seen in the footage.

Edited by perttime

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On 8/19/2019 at 10:16 AM, ziebart said:

Anybody look at putting the camera portion of a drone on a pole downrange of the shooter to get video without worrying about a drone crashing or the noise? If they put it on a side berm they could get shots from 2 bays. Sure you can't get every stage, but pick some good ones and switch it up during lunch or at the end of the shooting day.

 

I was planning to do something like this when I was doing the LiveShots video at Nationals, my plan was to have it behind the firing line using a large tripod that could see over any walls. Having it behind the competitor would eliminate any delays in setup as it could be done while the competitors are having their walkthrough. Setting up a down range camera for still shots is a lot easier as it only has to aim at a specific spot whereas the video needs to pick up the whole stage.

 

As the camera would be in a fixed location it would be easy to do that ‘merged video’ thing that shows two shooters at the same time for comparison.

 

Sound would come from a remote blue-tooth microphone that the RO could clip to their shirt or cap. This way all the range commands could be heard, clipping the sound to a lower dB rating would allow only the shooters gun to be picked up and not shots from another berm. 

 

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Even if it was downrange a camera on a powered mount with tracking software or even just manual control should give the operator enough margin that setup wasn't critical. All said, I have never used one of those cameras, only watched buddies use them.

 

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Posted (edited)

Set up downrange you won’t be able to see all the targets, up range you get the competitor and the targets they are shooting at.

Edited by BritinUSA

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I think drones should fly below the berm, in front of the shooter, at any three gun match When a shot gun is to be used. 👹 

I actually like to see drone footage. But it would  make a very fun and expensive moving target.

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