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Is a draw and one shot drill helpful for competition

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A second shot helps keep you honest with your grip and trigger pull.

+1 the second shot really tests your grip and gives you a better idea on a true draw time. I can rip off a sub .8 for one shot, I’m closer to 1 second when I’m shooting a drill or stage.


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On 8/11/2016 at 9:29 PM, PatJones said:

A second shot helps keep you honest with your grip and trigger pull.

^^^This.  Even if you are shooting at the same target it will help.  I like to have two targets to practice transitions on.  I'll spread them apart at varying distances.

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I think the merit of draw and one shot is to push yourself to the absolute edge of what you can do, bordering on losing control, so then you can come back a few steps and shoot comfortably there. If I can shave .1 seconds from buzzer to hand on grip and .25 seconds from grip to gun up and on target, then I have given myself a ton of extra room to focus on getting a solid grip and good sight alignment. 

 

Before I started a regimented dry fire schedule if I did draw and one shot drills and went as fast as possible the best I could do was around 1.25 with horrible accuracy. After a month of 3-4x/week dry fire with 5-10 reps warming up and getting progressively faster and then 10-15 reps pushing the par time, I got that down to consistently low 0.9s in live fire with maybe 10% in the high 0.8s. Accuracy is still poor at that speed, but now 1.2s and even 1.1s are plenty comfortable and controlled.

 

 

 

 

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It's good for classifiers and should be practiced when starting out but after you got that down you can filter that into multiple shot drills. 
For example, my favorite is a draw one shot then far hard transition one shot.  It's it works your first shot and more importantly to the sport over all is your transition speed. 

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I'm not so much worried about a fast draw as I am my ability to get a grip I don't need to adjust. I also used to take too much time trying to get a perfect sight picture on the draw and this drill taught me what I needed to see to get a shot on target quicker. 

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