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USPSA Divisions


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new folks aren't competitive in any division.

Really depends on who the new guy is and how well he shoots. Seems to me, if I recall correctly, Dave Sevigny was very competitive when he moved from IDPA to UDPSA shooting.


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  • 1 month later...
I would add a couple of things to the FAQ that were not obvious to me, coming in fresh to these new divisions:
In divisions where there are 10 round mag limits, you can use higher capacity magazines, but only load them to 10 rounds. Anyone who can count to 11 is going to figure out if you're trying something funny.
In production division - if you have a double action gun without a decocker, you must manually drop the hammer on a live round at the "make ready" command (per: 10.5.9 in the 2008 rule book). This is my least favorite part of the day when shooting production with my EAA Witness. I can tell the ROs love it too.
chuckr

Mags holding more than 10 rnds. in Prod and L-10 still have to meet physical size restrictions. Likewise in SS except 8 rnds if major and 10 if minor. No 10 rnds major mags.


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  • 4 weeks later...
1 hour ago, Ishoot2 said:

What caliber is best to shoot uspsa production, 9mm or 40cal or does it really matter.

 

 

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The advice I'd offer, as it was offered to me, is to start out shooting 9mm --especially if just getting started in competitive handgun shooting and you're on a tight budget. You're going to need to practice A LOT, and they're cheaper rounds...especially if you plan to buy factory loads vs reloading. If there's any disadvantage to shooting production minor in USPSA, that being 9mm, (I did it for three years and liked it just fine) it's the difference in scoring -- point scoring is higher if shooting major. I recently moving to single stack division major (.45 ACP) and really like the 1911 style pistol much better (especially the crispness of the trigger), and the recoil is also much different than that of a 9mm.  I somehow feel that I can stay on my front sight easier through the recoil of a .45 than as compared to the the snappiness of the muzzle of my 9mm.  I'm guessing .40 would be comparably snappy (or worse) to the 9mm, though I've never fired one.  If money's no object or you consider the cost difference insignificant, don't both starting out with 9mm, just buy a 45. Go to an indoor range where you can try before you buy, and see for yourself which style pistol you like better.  Hope this helped!

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1 hour ago, Ishoot2 said:

What caliber is best to shoot uspsa production, 9mm or 40cal or does it really matter.

 

 

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It doesn’t matter because there is no major power factor in Production. 9mm makes more sense as it’s cheaper.

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The advice I'd offer, as it was offered to me, is to start out shooting 9mm --especially if just getting started in competitive handgun shooting and you're on a tight budget. You're going to need to practice A LOT, and they're cheaper rounds...especially if you plan to buy factory loads vs reloading. If there's any disadvantage to shooting production minor in USPSA, that being 9mm, (I did it for three years and liked it just fine) it's the difference in scoring -- point scoring is higher if shooting major. I recently moving to single stack division major (.45 ACP) and really like the 1911 style pistol much better (especially the crispness of the trigger), and the recoil is also much different than that of a 9mm.  I somehow feel that I can stay on my front sight easier through the recoil of a .45 than as compared to the the snappiness of the muzzle of my 9mm.  I'm guessing .40 would be comparably snappy (or worse) to the 9mm, though I've never fired one.  If money's no object or you consider the cost difference insignificant, don't both starting out with 9mm, just buy a 45. Go to an indoor range where you can try before you buy, and see for yourself which style pistol you like better.  Hope this helped!

Thanks for your help Singingshooter.


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I'd start with whatever gun and caliber you happen to have right now   :)

 

Don't buy first - try it first and see if you like it.

 

Advantages of the 9mm - less expensive to shoot

 

Advantages of the .40 - if you reload to minor PF, you will probably get less recoil than the 9mm.

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  • 1 year later...

I shoot both UML 2x4 3-gun & USPSA. Other than most of the COF are usually tighter/faster in USPSA with tougher leans, no real problems that I have seen. For USPSA it is good to either have an offset optic or learn to shoot strong & weak hand because the leans are more designed for pistol shooters.

 

Just make sure you know local & USPSA rules for handling your PCC. They are much more restrictive than 3-gun. From un-bagging your PCC at a safe table not at your vehicle. Where to park your cart or bag. Where/when to un-case or take off cart against berm. Waiting for make ready to turn on dot. Several others that you don't always have in 3-gun.

 

gerritm

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9 minutes ago, Patrolmen said:

So with a new STI Staccato P Duo with a optic on it, 9mm.  I could only shoot open, correct?  How about without the optic?

Yes with the optic you can shoot only Open, without the optic you could shoot it in  Open, Limited, and Limited 10

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  • 1 year later...

If the only thing that puts your pistol in to Open Class is the slide mounted optic; would removing the battery from the RDS allow the pistol to be shot in Limited or do you need to remove the whole optic from the pistol? 

 

Staccato XL with a Leupold DP Pro. 

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22 minutes ago, GrumpyGrizz said:

If the only thing that puts your pistol in to Open Class is the slide mounted optic; would removing the battery from the RDS allow the pistol to be shot in Limited or do you need to remove the whole optic from the pistol? 

 

Staccato XL with a Leupold DP Pro. 

 

You can't have an optic on your gun in Limited, working or not.

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  • 2 months later...

Is there anything that would prevent you from running a PCC *with a brace* in open division?  Rule 5.1.10 prohibits "Handguns with shoulder stocks and/or fore grips of any kind", but since a brace is not a stock and the braced firearm is still considered a handgun, what prevents you from doing that?

 

I know this is an incredibly gamer kind of question, but so far I don't see anything in the rulebook that would prevent it.  You'd have to have a holster, of course.

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14 minutes ago, UpYoursPal said:

Is there anything that would prevent you from running a PCC *with a brace* in open division?  Rule 5.1.10 prohibits "Handguns with shoulder stocks and/or fore grips of any kind", but since a brace is not a stock and the braced firearm is still considered a handgun, what prevents you from doing that?

 

I know this is an incredibly gamer kind of question, but so far I don't see anything in the rulebook that would prevent it.  You'd have to have a holster, of course.

 

Might look funny in the holster. 

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15 minutes ago, UpYoursPal said:

Is there anything that would prevent you from running a PCC *with a brace* in open division?  Rule 5.1.10 prohibits "Handguns with shoulder stocks and/or fore grips of any kind", but since a brace is not a stock and the braced firearm is still considered a handgun, what prevents you from doing that?

 

I know this is an incredibly gamer kind of question, but so far I don't see anything in the rulebook that would prevent it.  You'd have to have a holster, of course.

Pretty sure you would have to take the forearm off as well as try to find a holster for that thing. Then you would get the crap kicked out of you by people with normal open guns so it wouldn't really matter in the long run. I would like to see somebody give it a try though 

 

 

Also if you shouldered it and started gripping any of the gun not on the normal grip, that may be considered a foregrip? I don't know on that one though. But if you were gripping say the magwell on an AR pistol, a range Master might call that a foregrip

 

 

 

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Just now, Racinready300ex said:

 

Major scoring might make it worth it. 

Very doubtful. Take PCC division and change the rules to only allow 171.25 mags but major scoring but only with a PCC with a brace (that you can't shoulder), and see how many people would shoot it. Not many, I would bet.

Use the right tool for the job...you wouldn't use a crescent wrench to drive nails if a hammer were available. 

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38 minutes ago, GrumpyOne said:

Very doubtful. Take PCC division and change the rules to only allow 171.25 mags but major scoring but only with a PCC with a brace (that you can't shoulder), and see how many people would shoot it. Not many, I would bet.

Use the right tool for the job...you wouldn't use a crescent wrench to drive nails if a hammer were available. 

 

Well, yeah if add a rule about how the brace can be used. But a PCC with a brace used the way most use them and a occasional reload scoring major would likely have a advantage over normal PCC.

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On 11/30/2021 at 3:21 PM, GrumpyOne said:

Very doubtful. Take PCC division and change the rules to only allow 171.25 mags but major scoring but only with a PCC with a brace (that you can't shoulder), and see how many people would shoot it. Not many, I would bet.

Use the right tool for the job...you wouldn't use a crescent wrench to drive nails if a hammer were available. 

Why couldn't you shoulder it?  As I posted earlier, 5.1.10 says that you can't use handguns with stocks, but I couldn't find anything in the rulebook that disallowed shouldering a braced pistol.

 

And Racinready300ex kinda made my point for me with regard to mags: even though you'd have to contend with some reloads, shooting major ammo out of a PCC-type "handgun" would be pretty game-changing.

 

EDIT: If you took the forearm/fore-grip off of the front and just handled the front of the magwell, I think that would still be legal.

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1 hour ago, UpYoursPal said:

Why couldn't you shoulder it?  As I posted earlier, 5.1.10 says that you can't use handguns with stocks, but I couldn't find anything in the rulebook that disallowed shouldering a braced pistol.

 

And Racinready300ex kinda made my point for me with regard to mags: even though you'd have to contend with some reloads, shooting major ammo out of a PCC-type "handgun" would be pretty game-changing.

 

EDIT: If you took the forearm/fore-grip off of the front and just handled the front of the magwell, I think that would still be legal.

See the part about "change the rules" in my post?

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