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Getting rid of "warm up" nerves/jitters


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The biggest gain I made in removing warm up jitters came from my stage / match planning. I purposely choose a conservative plan for the first stage of the match, and then focus on every minute detail during my walkthrough (details that may be less important later in the match). 

 

By giving myself to my process, I remove a lot of the margins for mental and emotional stress, and, thus, physical manifestations of that stress. 

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the last year or so I have had no first stage jitters (not counting the normal competition butterflies and excitement) because I have committed to calling every shot, and not rushing/trying/hurrying. I know from experience that if I call every shot, I will be as fast as I can be, and often faster than if I *try* to go fast.

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On 1/30/2018 at 9:35 AM, Sliv2 said:

The biggest gain I made in removing warm up jitters came from my stage / match planning. I purposely choose a conservative plan for the first stage of the match, and then focus on every minute detail during my walkthrough (details that may be less important later in the match). 

 

By giving myself to my process, I remove a lot of the margins for mental and emotional stress, and, thus, physical manifestations of that stress. 

Precisely!   The last few matches I have done this at, I had a 2nd or 3rd place finish on my first stage because of the "slowing it down" but won the match overall.  Just get all the little stuff going right out the gate and progress through the match.  Keeping it all between the navigational beacons. 

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I've noticed something about nerves/jitters over the years. Everyone feels them. People who know they didn't prepare enough tend to be negatively effected by jitters. People who have put the time in tend to experience neutral or even positive effects.

 

Set yourself up to succeed by dry firing everyday, do some dryfire the morning of the match to physically warm up the movement pathways, visualize the stage until it flows in your mind vividly and naturally, then go hit the middle of the targets. When you've adequately prepared, I think what used to be jitters becomes tuned alertness.

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1 minute ago, Jake Di Vita said:

I've noticed something about nerves/jitters over the years. Everyone feels them. People who know they didn't prepare enough tend to be negatively effected by jitters. People who have put the time in tend to experience neutral or even positive effects.

 

Set yourself up to succeed by dry firing everyday, do some dryfire the morning of the match to physically warm up the movement pathways, visualize the stage until it flows in your mind vividly and naturally, then go hit the middle of the targets. When you've adequately prepared, I think what used to be jitters becomes tuned alertness.

:bow:

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On 1/31/2018 at 6:32 PM, motosapiens said:

the last year or so I have had no first stage jitters (not counting the normal competition butterflies and excitement) because I have committed to calling every shot, and not rushing/trying/hurrying. I know from experience that if I call every shot, I will be as fast as I can be, and often faster than if I *try* to go fast.

 

Printed & placed on the wall. 

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  • 8 months later...
On 9/9/2015 at 3:48 PM, Dimitri said:

Had this for years. Adrenalin gets too high and hands start shaking.

I find it quite effective to drink a fresh orange juice and eat some candy/pastry half an hour before I use the gun.

(I have mild hypoglycaemia, so my blood sugar might get too low because of the adrenalin).

Talking to some old shooters they said that in the '80s (when they were competing) it was very common to have some sugar cubes before each match (apparently the blood sugar cycle has the effect of calming the nerves)

Great advice. Thanks!

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i now practice with no warm up, just as you would start a match.  Yes a few draws from the holster maybe but then getting right into the stage or a part of it.  Learning to go from zero to 100 is part of the game .Practicing your more difficult stages cold prepares you for the experience in  match time. Your physical and psychological  parts of the game need to be ready to go at the buzzer. Even if it's  been 48 hours since you fired the last shot

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