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Ub3RDoRK

Why do pros choose a vertical mount vs a 90 degree?

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I had someone mention to me at a match today that they chose a vertical mount for their C-more vs a 90 degree because "most pro's do it". I understand his choice since he was running 38 super with 3 holes in the barrel but i didn't quite understand the comment about how the "pros choose" their vertical mount.

After thinking about it..i do see a majority of people using the vertical from various manufacturers, but why?

I currently have a 90 degree cheely and seem fine with it but when i pointed his gun it felt different somehow....almost quicker? I've been racking my brain debating on making the switch?

The only pro i can think of is a lower sight picture to resemble an iron sight when switching platforms....but thats it.

input?

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I figure it's a recent development and most pros were already on their way before then. You don't get good changing your gear all the time.

It does impede your vision on some target arrays too. ie shooting a plate rack right to left is much harder than left to right with mine. I'm left eye dominant and right handed.

Edited by dansedgli

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"Pro" . That's funny. I'm not a pro but I shot both and now run 90's. They are not a cool looking. I personally don't like the look of the 90 but ejection becomes a non issue, the dots quicker to pick up, the parallax is almost non existent. For those advantages I'll choose function over beauty every day.

If somebody says they use something because the "pro's " use it they need to broaden their horizon a lot.

I know open shooters who won't shoot 9MAJOR because it ain't as "cool" as 38 super. That's just dumb.

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I can see the point of right to left arrays. I as well am right handed w/left eye dominance. I guess i haven't really noticed it with my 90 degree mount....or maybe I've overcome this issue. I've been shooting open for about 2 months now and I guess I'm still just learning different equipment and what works for me. It's just expensive!

As for the ejection, I see how that could be a problem. But I have a tuned aftec in my turbor and it runs like a top so I'd hate to change anything. I guess I'm just trying to find the best advantage in this sport.

Edited by Ub3RDoRK

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Because they work for them!

Figure out why a Vertical is not working for you before you change it

General rule of thumb with anything new on your gun or a new gun

Several thousand rounds fired to get used to it and then several more thousand to decide if it works for you

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When you practice as much as a "Pro", the whole issue of not being able to

"find the dot" becomes a non-issue.

No real advantage to turning the C-More sideways .... :cheers:

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Hello: There are some pros that are changing over. I think mostly it is because they shoot iron sighted guns as well as scoped guns. The transition is made easier that way. With either scope practice is key to learning them. Talk to any pro and they dry fire a lot so the vertical is a none issue. I know some that like the vertical mount since they can index the slide for fast close shots, not even looking at the dot. I would suggest you try both and see what works best for you. Thanks, Eric

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I had a sideways mount for roughly a year on my 2011. Really liked it when I got it, and slowly fell out of love with it the more I used it. I had a local GM ask me why i shot an array the way I did, and I didn't have a good reason other than I transitioned better left to right with the 90. Then I started to notice how I would subconsciously sacrifice stage efficiency based on trying to always transition left to right. Granted,I know most of this was in my head and I probably could have transition the other way OK but but at the time I was trying to get into A and had kind of got stagnant. When I switched to a upright mount the change over was very easy but I could clearly see how much I was giving up with the sideways mount. I know every one is different but this is just my finding. I personally don't ever see myself going back to a sideways mount.

I also noticed there was a difference in the dot tracking on my particular pistol,with the extra weight of the mount and c-more hanging off the side the dot would track in a oval pattern with all the weight more centered the dot tracks straight up and down. Upright mounts also give you more room for a thumb rest if that's your thing too, I personally don't like one of those either though.

Edited by DRichardson

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Just a personal preference thing. I have used both setups and I just prefer the 90 degree. It makes it easier to go and shoot Limited since the dot is now where the irons line up. I shoot with both eyes open so I don't notice the right to left transitioning problem that others have mentioned.

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Conside how many people are proud of the looks of their open guns! And the smiths go out of their way to make the guns beautiful and unique.

And then you mount that 90 degrees abomination on top of it?

If parallax bothers you, consider a small sight like the RTS2, they bridge the gap quite nicely.

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There is a reason for why the C-More is designed the way it is..........and thus why it is named as such. For some folks that often switch back and forth between limited and open, I might see an argument for a sideways C-More. But for the other 99.9% of the folks that would do that........you just converted your C-More to a C-Less.

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If only the rts worked. I'd switch to it from my 90 mount.

I am testing their latest mod, and is is holding so far.

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If only the rts worked. I'd switch to it from my 90 mount.

I am testing their latest mod, and is is holding so far.

The problem is, until a few people get tens of thousands of rounds through it with no issues, it would always be uncertain. And it only takes one time for it to screw up...

I'm not willing to gamble right now with these odds.

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hmmmm I think I may just have to pick one up to try it. A lot of good points here. I think the biggest thing is the right to left shooting. I guess ive never really noticed it but its worth a try to see if it improves overall.

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Started with a vertical, switched to a 90, then an RTS2 and now back to a vertical. I could not be happier. Sort of wish I never left the vertical in the first place. The grass is not always greener on the other side.

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Conside how many people are proud of the looks of their open guns! And the smiths go out of their way to make the guns beautiful and unique.

And then you mount that 90 degrees abomination on top of it?

If parallax bothers you, consider a small sight like the RTS2, they bridge the gap quite nicely.

Actually my first open gun was a Glock and I was using a Fastfire 2 on a SJC mount. The real problem with using a MRDS is that the window height is much smaller than a round CMORE lens, 16mm vs 29mm. If Cmore or another manufacturer actually made a MRDS with the 29mm round lens and it was reliable then I would switch over. For you to say that mounting a Cmore at 90 degrees is an abomination is pretty silly. Especially after the "smiths making their guns beautiful and unique" comment. Seems to me hanging it at 90 degrees may play into that "uniqueness" factor that some shooters are looking for, rather than going with what is considered the norm.

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The relationship of the sight over the bore is not parallax. The alignment of the image and crosshairs in a scope, and misalignment of them as you move your eye from the center of the scope, is parallax.

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I wonder why C more, did not make the RTS with the same size window as the C more optic?

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I wonder why C more, did not make the RTS with the same size window as the C more optic?

After a while you don't notice the difference in size any more.

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I recently began shooting open and kept have trouble acquiring the dot. During a match a self-proclaimed expert said that this was entirely due to not using a 90 degree mount. I asked him if there were negatives to a 90 degree sight and he indicated that he has had to replace his 90 degree sights but he considers them "disposable" and just the cost of shooting open. This seems like flawed logic to me. I wouldn't consider a c-more sight to be disposable and my dot acquisition has dramatically improved with dry fire practice and more my lack of experience.

Two questions for you guys. Do you think that sights don't last as long in the 90 degree position due to more blast forces? Have you ever even had to actually replace a vertical sight? I have only had to replace a module and battery.

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Doc,

I had a plastic cmore on a Quinn3 sideways mount on my full size open gun for about 2 seasons .... never lost a zero or cracked. I switched to an aluminum cmore when I had the gun refinished (the red plastic didn't match the chameleon finish) and haven't had a single problem with that sight in the past few years. This is all running 175+PF loads.

On the subject of the sight being exposed to more "blast" when mounted sideways - my gun has had 2 popple holes with both sights. I consider the Quinn to be a "set-back" mount compared to some of the other mounts out there. I can go an entire match without having to wipe the lens.

Edited by Desmo412

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The relationship of the sight over the bore is not parallax. The alignment of the image and crosshairs in a scope, and misalignment of them as you move your eye from the center of the scope, is parallax.

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