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First stage set up

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I have to set up a stage for the first time in a couple weeks and need a little help. Is there a website full of pre-designed stages? I don't plan on designing my own for this first set up. I want something fairly easy to setup but still fun for the shooters. If someone could recommend a pre-designed stage that would be awesome!

Any quick tips for a first timer?

Thanks!

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Three paper targets at 40-50 yards.

Stage 1 - Fire 5 shots into one target, free style, reload and five more shots.

Stage 2 - Fire 5 shots into one target, kneeling, " " " .

Stage 3 - Fire five shots into one target, prone " " " ..

Quick to set up, and Lots of Fun. :cheers:

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Thank you! While I would enjoy such a stage I can see a lot of guys at my club would be bitching about kneeling and going prone. Not something I want to deal with just yet. lol

But that would be super easy to set up!

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My best recommendation is to get a local stage designer to mentor you. They can give you their initial tips and help debug your first tries.

The short answer to your question is no -- aside from Classifiers, there is no ready-made resource. Mainly because it's intended that our stage designs are unique. I can't cite it off the top of my head, but that's in the rules somewhere. That being said, if you googled "uspsa nationals match booklet" you'll get some PDF hits that will give you dozens and dozens of ideas for warping into something of your own.

This next bit isn't exhaustive, but some starting tips --

  1. Read the rule book section on stage design so you're not wasting time with your mentor on easy stuff that's right there in black and white.
  2. Don't place targets that can only be engaged near the 180. It may be the shooter's responsibility whether they break the 180 or not, but it is a very poor stage design that forces them to be close to it in the first place.
  3. Make sure you don't have one or two magic spots the entire stage can be cleared from.
  4. Constantly be double checking for shoot-throughs. And even if all of the angles worked without shoot-throughs on paper, your setup crew can gift you with some anyway.
  5. Look at likely stage breakdowns for each of the divisions. How would shooters at the different capacities shoot it? If mag changes are too obvious and easy, consider changing the sizes of some of you arrays to make them work a little. By the same token, a stage that forces shooters into a bunch of standing reloads is frustrating as well. There's a balance there somewhere between too easy and too hard.
  6. The best stages have multiple options for engaging at least some of the targets. If you have the shooters thinking, "I can take that target from here as a riskier shot and eliminate that whole position or I can take the guaranteed double A from there" you're going in the right direction.

Good luck!

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My best recommendation is to get a local stage designer to mentor you. They can give you their initial tips and help debug your first tries.

The short answer to your question is no -- aside from Classifiers, there is no ready-made resource. Mainly because it's intended that our stage designs are unique. I can't cite it off the top of my head, but that's in the rules somewhere. That being said, if you googled "uspsa nationals match booklet" you'll get some PDF hits that will give you dozens and dozens of ideas for warping into something of your own.

This next bit isn't exhaustive, but some starting tips --

  1. Read the rule book section on stage design so you're not wasting time with your mentor on easy stuff that's right there in black and white.
  2. Don't place targets that can only be engaged near the 180. It may be the shooter's responsibility whether they break the 180 or not, but it is a very poor stage design that forces them to be close to it in the first place.
  3. Make sure you don't have one or two magic spots the entire stage can be cleared from.
  4. Constantly be double checking for shoot-throughs. And even if all of the angles worked without shoot-throughs on paper, your setup crew can gift you with some anyway.
  5. Look at likely stage breakdowns for each of the divisions. How would shooters at the different capacities shoot it? If mag changes are too obvious and easy, consider changing the sizes of some of you arrays to make them work a little. By the same token, a stage that forces shooters into a bunch of standing reloads is frustrating as well. There's a balance there somewhere between too easy and too hard.
  6. The best stages have multiple options for engaging at least some of the targets. If you have the shooters thinking, "I can take that target from here as a riskier shot and eliminate that whole position or I can take the guaranteed double A from there" you're going in the right direction.

Good luck!

excellent! Thank you!

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