Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
72stick

Ruger precision rifle

Recommended Posts

It's a lot of rifle for a G. I've been kicking the idea around for about a year to take one of my bench guns and rechamber it from 6BR to 6CM and drop it into a chassis for PRS style matches. Now I can just buy this for about the same money and actually gain a rifle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a lot of rifle for a G. I've been kicking the idea around for about a year to take one of my bench guns and rechamber it from 6BR to 6CM and drop it into a chassis for PRS style matches. Now I can just buy this for about the same money and actually gain a rifle.

Well, PRS is definitely a market they are going after. For right around $2000-$2200, you can get what looks to be a decent 6.5CM with a couple interchangeable mags and a decent FFP scope and mount. That's just a little more than what a Rem 700 SPS would run but without the DBM/Mags and adjustable buttstock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone at Ruger went all-in with the smart pills.

I haven't seen a new gun design this well thought-out and "end-user" oriented in a long, long time. Initial caliber offering is excellent, the magazine well system is genius. The barrel retaining system is awesome, very easy to swap barrels. Trigger adjustment bolt takedown tool onboard the gun, 20MOA scope base standard. It can take most any sort of AR furniture, including grips and selectors.

This is some killer market-driven product design. Good for Ruger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone at Ruger went all-in with the smart pills.

I haven't seen a new gun design this well thought-out and "end-user" oriented in a long, long time. Initial caliber offering is excellent, the magazine well system is genius. The barrel retaining system is awesome, very easy to swap barrels. Trigger adjustment bolt takedown tool onboard the gun, 20MOA scope base standard. It can take most any sort of AR furniture, including grips and selectors.

This is some killer market-driven product design. Good for Ruger.

Lets not forget it appears to be threaded and suppressor ready!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any chance this could get moved to the Precision Rifle subforum? Seems like a better home for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to shoot one of these today in 243 pretty cool setup for $900

I have to admit that .243 seems an odd choice for this rifle. It's a caliber you see that much interest in any more. Tends to be too hot and barrels don't last.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many long range shooters going to the .243 with heavy bullets. Also popular for some pursuits that are forbidden to discuss on here. Makes very good sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many long range shooters going to the .243 with heavy bullets. Also popular for some pursuits that are forbidden to discuss on here. Makes very good sense to me.

I have seen a lot of people talking about 243 for LR stuff with heavy bullrts, and it is an excellent round for the forbidden pursuits you mention. But does it not still burn up barrels really fast when using heavy pills? I thought that was one of the biggest reasons going against it, was that barrel life sucks? I don't know much about how barrel life is computed other than bullet weight/length and velocity...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does have shorter barrel life than say a 260. However, with this rifle, easy barrel swaps make that less of a concern since you are not also paying the smith to change barrels.

I have shot out one 260 barrel but my 243 is still cranking and I am at about 5k on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to shoot one of these today in 243 pretty cool setup for $900

I have to admit that .243 seems an odd choice for this rifle. It's a caliber you see that much interest in any more. Tends to be too hot and barrels don't last.

The most popular cartridge right now in the PRS matches is the 6CR, the .243 Winchester is about the closest commercial cartridge available to match it. If I could only own one rifle, the .243 would be a strong contender. With projectile weights ranging from 55gr to 115gr, it can do just about anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5k on a 243, I would like to see that throat, the best I have ever got on my 243 was 2500ish and I had the barrel melonited

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The serious PRS guys shooting the 6mm bullets are the type that wouldn't flinch at having to replace a barrel every season, but they aren't shooting .243. And I doubt you would find any of them buying this rifle either.

This is an entry level rifle and while .308 and 6.5CM make sense for the market it appears to be targeted for, the only reason I can think of for including the .243 is to perhaps appeal to smaller frame shooters who need less recoil. I really don't see this as appealing to hunters.

As for swapping barrels, I think that this might be a job for a gunsmith. The only comment I've seen is one in the article at the Hide which said the same thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ruger offering the rifle in 243 with the fast twist barrel just proves that Ruger has done it's homework. Entry level rifle or not, the rifle can win. I have learned a long time ago that for me , a .2 is not worth the extra $1200 that it would cost. If I had the funds for the extra, then it would not be a issue. The rifle is built for the average shooter and I think Ruger has hit a homerun with this one. The better barrels will come for this rifle, then the .2 will come at a lower price then the $1200. Practical accuracy is a great thing in the real world. Numbers crunches will argue it all day long, but doable practical accuracy will win every time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The .243 makes sense until one of the big ammo manufactures starts selling 6mm Creedmoor ammunition and not just brass. Once that happens I'm sure Ruger announce a brand new model shooting the latest greatest caliber. It looks like a solid entry rifle, I've scrapped my plans to build a 6.5 Creedmoor from a Savage model 10 I bought the day before Ruger announced this because it looks like I can just buy what I was wanting for less now.

Gun makers tell us lots of things should be done by a gunsmith and we ignore them all the time. :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hornady is a pretty big ammo company, and they do 4 or 5 different loads for 6.5C.

I think Winchester has introduced a factory Creedmoor load as well.

EDIT: I just actually used both eyes to read the above post... :yawn: you said 6mm Creedmoor... that's a whole different animal.

Edited by dcloudy777

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You aren't going to have to spend too much money to send off the factory .243 barrel and have it bumped back for 6mm Creed. This rifle just keeps looking better and better, now where is the left handed version!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope Ruger does a lefty, my son and daughter are lefties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive been impressed with Rugers offerings lately. This really has my interest, but I've not had the best luck in the accuracy department with Ruger long guns. The reviews I've read were from gun writers with pre-production samples and seem to average about .75moa. (I've got AR's that will do better) For a rifle like this, this isn't stellar, and has me concerned that production samples may end up worse. If I plunk down the cash for this rifle and ended up with 1moa or worse Id be livid. Do any of you guys with Precision rifle experience feel the same concern? or am I worried for nothing? I Wish Ruger would make some accuracy guarantee. They love the phrase "Meets our specifications" with out telling you what that is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You aren't going to have to spend too much money to send off the factory .243 barrel and have it bumped back for 6mm Creed. This rifle just keeps looking better and better, now where is the left handed version!

And what would a 6 creedmoor do better than a 243 ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You aren't going to have to spend too much money to send off the factory .243 barrel and have it bumped back for 6mm Creed. This rifle just keeps looking better and better, now where is the left handed version!

And what would a 6 creedmoor do better than a 243 ?

I asked myself the same question a few years ago and the truth is that it is just a more efficient cartridge. My shooting partner was getting almost the same velocity I was in my 243 and he was using almost 2 grains less. I reload so I figure I might as well switch over to 6 creedmoor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You aren't going to have to spend too much money to send off the factory .243 barrel and have it bumped back for 6mm Creed. This rifle just keeps looking better and better, now where is the left handed version!

And what would a 6 creedmoor do better than a 243 ?

The Creed has a far more efficient shoulder angle, which makes it both easier on the barrel and more accurate. You also get a longer neck which will allow more consistent neck tension when shooting the 105's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saving 2 grains of powder is always nice, thats about the only advantage from a bolt gun. Barrel life is a wash between the 2

You aren't going to have to spend too much money to send off the factory .243 barrel and have it bumped back for 6mm Creed. This rifle just keeps looking better and better, now where is the left handed version!

And what would a 6 creedmoor do better than a 243 ?

The Creed has a far more efficient shoulder angle, which makes it both easier on the barrel and more accurate. You also get a longer neck which will allow more consistent neck tension when shooting the 105's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reviews I've read were from gun writers with pre-production samples and seem to average about .75moa.

That's going to be the real question. Can the production guns hold .75 MOA out of the box with good ammo? Can they do better?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...