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Top Shelf 1911s vs Glock based Pistols

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Financially its going to get worse. Cars, clothing, food (eating like crazy), electrical bills, college, books, and it never stops. BUT.....its worth it.

And get used to these words at a match....."Got anything else for sale?"

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Started with Glocks 15 years ago.  Moved to SS/L10 with 1911's.  Took 8 years off and now back in with a pair of STI's and loving it.  Sure they need more care than a Glock but just feel's right with a 1911/2011 platform.

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I'm currently debating this idea as well, I'm thinking I could build a "budget" 35 or 22 with a Taylor Freelance with minimal investment for limited and be competitive.  Then I think I should buy once cry once and never wonder if my equipment was limiting my performance as I get better.  I'm now thinking a CZ might be a more friendly option on my bank account.

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Ask Bob Vogel. Others have gone from Glock to 2011's, but good is good. Something to be said about the shooter who can out shoot the gun he currently owns and needs to upgrade, versus never growing into the fancier gun that was purchased right off the bat.

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I would have to say that a really good shooter won the Nationals shooting a glock. Just imagine what he could do with a well built 2011! 

 

A friend once told me, "if your racing a pinto against a corvette, it doesn't matter how good of a driver you are." Guess that was proven wrong at the Nationals. Maybe it's the old tortoise and the hare.

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On 11/7/2017 at 4:11 AM, Boudreaux78 said:

I would have to say that a really good shooter won the Nationals shooting a glock. Just imagine what he could do with a well built 2011! 

 

A friend once told me, "if your racing a pinto against a corvette, it doesn't matter how good of a driver you are." Guess that was proven wrong at the Nationals. Maybe it's the old tortoise and the hare.



Eh not a perfect analogy it's more like a corvette vs. a car that has a corvette engine but not the suspension or tires to really keep it on the road.  You can learn to drive it just as fast maybe but it'll be harder. 

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On 11/2/2015 at 11:12 PM, jeremy kemlo said:

I will make you all feel better. I have 7 kids. The oldest is 15 and can't wait to drive and the youngest is 2. Free time? I shoot production and it is always fun when the fat guy with 7 kids beats the young guys w stis. It's a no loose situation.

We are going to a jr pheasant hunt in two weeks.

Wouldn't trade it for anything.

Thats pretty cool!

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You can't beat the feel of a 1911 Trigger, short light and crisp. Not to mention the 1911 is the best looking guns out there.

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Any metal frame gun feels better to shoot than a polymer gun. With that being said, shooting is just fun no matter what you are shooting. Went and shot 22s the other day and had a blast! As long as you are having fun, that’s all that matters!

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As long as you keep shooting who cares what division it’s in. Nobodies judging you by what you have, where all just here for the same things.

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Watch Gunbroker like a hawk.  Every once in a while you'll see a screaming deal on high-end guns and nobody else will notice.  It's how I got my current open gun!

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I keep thinking my Glock 19 has a nice trigger..... then I get the 1911 out of the safe and feel shame.  That's kinda the problem though, the 1911 sits in a safe and the glock gets used.  Partly because I'm lazy and hate cleaning 1911s , partly because the glock fits a wider variety of my needs.

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As has been said sometimes life pushes you in a different direction. The biggest part is to still be able to shoot no matter what platform it is, just enjoy yourself!

 

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When I was younger I shot 5 days a week, 500 rounds a day, 300 through a pistol, 200 through a rifle.  It was all rimfire, but trigger time is trigger time.

 

Things changed in life and now I am happy if I can make it to the range once a week.

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2011's are awesome, but I learned I would have turned into a much better shooter if I had shot a $500 gun and spent that other $3000 on ammo and practice.

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3 minutes ago, Will_M said:

 I would have turned into a better shooter if I had shot a $500 gun and spent that other $3000 on ammo and practice.

 

Sort of.     :surprise:

 

IFF the practice was good practice.

 

I used to shoot all the time, before BE, and never seemed to get too much better,

until I started reading some of the better shots here at BE and learned more

about HOW to practice properly.    :cheers:

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Someone a long time ago told me something that still rings true. First you have to train and then you have to practice to see if your training worked. Some people like to just practice but it doesn’t work as well if you don’t train. Training is most important, but without practice you will only learn if the training worked at a match. Example: I worked on dry fire reloads with empty mags. Got really fast. Didn’t practice and went to a match. During the match, with bullets in the mags, didn’t seat the mag well and it fell out on the first shot. Live fire practice would’ve revealed my training failures prior to the match. One has to support the other and vis versa.

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On 10/31/2018 at 2:07 PM, Boudreaux78 said:

Someone a long time ago told me something that still rings true. First you have to train and then you have to practice to see if your training worked. Some people like to just practice but it doesn’t work as well if you don’t train. Training is most important, but without practice you will only learn if the training worked at a match. Example: I worked on dry fire reloads with empty mags. Got really fast. Didn’t practice and went to a match. During the match, with bullets in the mags, didn’t seat the mag well and it fell out on the first shot. Live fire practice would’ve revealed my training failures prior to the match. One has to support the other and vis versa.

 

I really like the separation of "training" and "practice."  I fell short of my goals as a professional athlete because I didn't train on my off hours.  The consistent thing I see with professional athletes/musicians/anything is the love and/or dedication to training on their own.  When everyone else is going on dates or partying or sleeping they are doing skill development.

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Your mags and gun will be cheap and reliable. Kinda crazy that a new magazine can cost 100+ for a 2011

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