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8# long slide recoil spring in a Stock II 9mm


Gdub

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I ran one in mine forever and didn't realize was a long slide til guess about month or so ago when there was a thread on here about recoil springs. Worked fine in my Stock II. Didn't feel like real sluggish or anything

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I run a 9lb in my match gun, and if I am doing practice only I do an 11lb. 11lb seems to be able to shoot longer without getting sluggish.

The 9lb definitely feels better and lighter recoiling.

Wyatt

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I run a 9lb in my match gun, and if I am doing practice only I do an 11lb. 11lb seems to be able to shoot longer without getting sluggish.

The 9lb definitely feels better and lighter recoiling.

Wyatt

So the lighter recoil spring gave you less felt recoil? I would think it would be the opposite for some reason. I have no science to back that up just trying to realize how the gun operates.

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I run a 9lb in my match gun, and if I am doing practice only I do an 11lb. 11lb seems to be able to shoot longer without getting sluggish.

The 9lb definitely feels better and lighter recoiling.

Wyatt

So the lighter recoil spring gave you less felt recoil? I would think it would be the opposite for some reason. I have no science to back that up just trying to realize how the gun operates.

Yes. I was running 9# spring in my stock 2 but am trying out an 8# now. Shot about 150 rounds today and it felt great.

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I run a 9lb in my match gun, and if I am doing practice only I do an 11lb. 11lb seems to be able to shoot longer without getting sluggish.

The 9lb definitely feels better and lighter recoiling.

Wyatt

So the lighter recoil spring gave you less felt recoil? I would think it would be the opposite for some reason. I have no science to back that up just trying to realize how the gun operates.

I "think" the lighter spring allows a slightly longer distance for the slide to move back resulting in more linear motion and less raise. then when it goes foreward there is less muzzle snap down so you're back on target with the sights faster. The shooters brain correlates flat as less recoil. Not sure if that's correct, but it's one take on it.

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I run a 9lb in my match gun, and if I am doing practice only I do an 11lb. 11lb seems to be able to shoot longer without getting sluggish.

The 9lb definitely feels better and lighter recoiling.

Wyatt

So the lighter recoil spring gave you less felt recoil? I would think it would be the opposite for some reason. I have no science to back that up just trying to realize how the gun operates.

I "think" the lighter spring allows a slightly longer distance for the slide to move back resulting in more linear motion and less raise. then when it goes foreward there is less muzzle snap down so you're back on target with the sights faster. The shooters brain correlates flat as less recoil. Not sure if that's correct, but it's one take on it.

Incorrect regarding longer distance. Unless the recoil spring is insanely heavy(or the load really light), so much so that the gun doesn't cycle properly, then the slide will not make the full cycle. Otherwise, most typical springs allow full travel of the slide.

https://youtu.be/w3UVLm2GajI

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Incorrect regarding longer distance. Unless the recoil spring is insanely heavy(or the load really light), so much so that the gun doesn't cycle properly, then the slide will not make the full cycle. Otherwise, most typical springs allow full travel of the slide.

Please don't give bad, non scientific advice here

Your spring weight is going to dictate the rate at which the recoil energy of the slide gets transferred to the frame, as well as how far the slide travels. The gun will still cycle even if the slide barely goes past the base of the next round or bottoms out on the frame. Tuning this is how you can achieve a flatter shooting gun.

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For future reference, someone here was told by Wolff directly that their 'long slide' springs are just the 'full size' ones but rated two lb heavier. So the one you pulled out of the package labeled 8lb long slide (Stock III/Limited/Limited Pro), SHOULD BE identical to what you would pull out of the package for a spring labeled 10lb full size (stock II size). Sounds like the common range of full size spring preferences ranges from 8lb to 11lb. I am currently trying a 9lb in my Stock II, but don't have a lot of rounds down range yet.

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I'm running a 9lb Long Slide in my SIII at 136 PF. Gun doesn't muzzle flip.

Don't attribute Muzzle Flip and Recoil to just your spring. There are people that run the lightest of Recoil springs and still have a flat shooting gun because they have a death grip on the gun.

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Anyone running a 8# long slide recoil spring in their Stock II 9mm?

Also, does recoil spring weight make a difference in recoil?

My 6 lb long slide spring was taking a crap on me during a class, slow to return to battery and sometimes needed a "bump" to help it out. The teacher was a sponsored shooter for EAA and told me to get a 10lb, I did and never had a problem since.

If there is a difference in recoil between 6 and 10lb, it isn't enough to notice.

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  • 1 month later...

So, of you were going to build a Limited 40 S&W what would you start with??? I am thinking about a 9 or 10 and start there, not sure what I'm going to do inside yet, ie: firing pin, hammer, internal springs....i will install the Henning trigger for sure.

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So, of you were going to build a Limited 40 S&W what would you start with??? I am thinking about a 9 or 10 and start there, not sure what I'm going to do inside yet, ie: firing pin, hammer, internal springs....i will install the Henning trigger for sure.

I seem to recall henning having the exact spring for that 10.75#

http://henningshop.com/products/tanfoglio-recoil-spring-1075-lb-h1075

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Thanks Johnbu, I thought I'd seen a spring rate on here for 10.75 and wasn't sure. I really wasn't sure I wanted a Limited gun until lately and decided to build one, I;ll talk to Henning about his recommendations for a Limited, Thanks again!!

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Incorrect regarding longer distance. Unless the recoil spring is insanely heavy(or the load really light), so much so that the gun doesn't cycle properly, then the slide will not make the full cycle. Otherwise, most typical springs allow full travel of the slide.

Please don't give bad, non scientific advice here

Your spring weight is going to dictate the rate at which the recoil energy of the slide gets transferred to the frame, as well as how far the slide travels. The gun will still cycle even if the slide barely goes past the base of the next round or bottoms out on the frame. Tuning this is how you can achieve a flatter shooting gun.

Sorry, i have to disagree with you on achieving a flatter shooting gun. If you use a spring so heavy that it does not allow the slide to travel fully back, the muzzle dip would be huge, you should watch the youtube vid and see the dip with heavier springs.

I prefer the light recoil spring with a hard grip for flat shooting.

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Incorrect regarding longer distance. Unless the recoil spring is insanely heavy(or the load really light), so much so that the gun doesn't cycle properly, then the slide will not make the full cycle. Otherwise, most typical springs allow full travel of the slide.

Please don't give bad, non scientific advice here

Your spring weight is going to dictate the rate at which the recoil energy of the slide gets transferred to the frame, as well as how far the slide travels. The gun will still cycle even if the slide barely goes past the base of the next round or bottoms out on the frame. Tuning this is how you can achieve a flatter shooting gun.

Unless you've got an extremely unreliable gun, your slide should be travelling fast enough to impact the frame with some force. You could try to tune it such that the slide will stop somewhere between ejection and frame impact, but good luck getting it to run reliably or finding a spring heavy enough.

There are basically 3 major parts to recoil that we can feel:

1. Round firing - disctated by power factor

2. Slide hitting frame - dictated by slide speed and weight

3. Slide going into battery - dictated by slide speed and weight

Given an unchanging slide weight, and consistent ammo, we can play with the recoil spring to change #2 & #3. It is true that a heavier spring will impart more energy to the shooter during spring compression, but it will have less slide speed upon frame impact which negates this effect, leaving us with #3 as our main tuning parameter that can be easily felt. Putting a lighter spring in reduces muzzle dip upon going into battery, and generally is preceived as lighter recoiling.

For future reference, someone here was told by Wolff directly that their 'long slide' springs are just the 'full size' ones but rated two lb heavier. So the one you pulled out of the package labeled 8lb long slide (Stock III/Limited/Limited Pro), SHOULD BE identical to what you would pull out of the package for a spring labeled 10lb full size (stock II size). Sounds like the common range of full size spring preferences ranges from 8lb to 11lb. I am currently trying a 9lb in my Stock II, but don't have a lot of rounds down range yet.

Gun springs are typically rated at full compression rather than spring rate, so a longer spring of a given rate would take more force to fully compress.

Every manufacturer is a bit different, so weights can only be used as a comparison within one brand. Last time I checked Wolff and ISMI 1911 recoil springs on a spring guage, they were about 2lbs off (with ISMI being much closer to the rated weight).

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also...your hammer spring can also make a difference...16lb vs 13 lb. ie: your gun is going out of battery pushing against a hammer that is forward after the shot is fired. just fyi.

As can the profile of the slide stop (small vs large radius), but those are fairly minor changes to the overall recoil impulse in my experience, and left out for the sake of clarity.

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