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Overcoming pushing the gun down


seanc

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I have an issue where when I start to speed up I tend to push the gun down. I don't think its a flinch necessarily its more like a preignition push. I only say that because I can stand at 30 or 35 yards and shoot 8" plates no problem, but if I move in to say 12 yards and speed up there is a tendency to see the dot drop away right before the gun goes off.

It almost doesn't matter if I do it relatively slowly, like a .50 split or if I do like a .35 split.

I don't always see it happen either which is frustrating. Sometimes I see the dot suddenly fall away(but I don't feel myself pushing it down) and the shot goes, and sometimes I am positive the dot is in the a zone yet the hit is not there. Sometimes its the first shot, sometimes its the second shot.

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Perhaps it's sloppy trigger control - which is something I find myself fighting constantly at speed. Try focus really hard on good trigger control and see if things improve. I also find that gripping the gun really hard helps

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My son develops a push every now and then. I watch him closely when we practice. I'll load his mag and put some dummy rounds in. If he dips the muzzle on the dummy round I send him off for 5 minutes of dry fire practice. He always comes back with the problem gone. I'd say get some dry fire in and watch that front site for movement.

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  • 1 month later...

It helped me to think of gripping the gun tight in the back (top, bottom, left, right), instead of hard per se. Probably because I have the strength of a 14 year old girl.

I eventually noticed the bottom of my palm slightly peeling off (not really, just less pressure), then my pinky would grip tighter at fire. I was gripping hard on top, just my pinky wasn't. To make matters worse I could keep the sights steady and press the trigger straight back when dry firing even when the grip wasn't tight on the bottom. Then I'd shoot live fire, or a match, and discovered that my pinkie would squeeze harder into the bottom of my palm. So now I think thumb-palm as a padded U-shaped plate and make sure there is equal-pressure behind the gun. I even had to re-learn the trigger press because it felt different after the correction.

It's funny that the title is "pushing" the gun down, because I was actually pulling it down. Kind of like milking the gun, only just with the picky.

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Dot torture drill. :devil:

I haven't tried dot torture but I have been doing the frank garcia dot drill, 6 dots, 6 rounds on each dot.

I am doing this with an open revolver(for icore). I am doing 7 yards, 10 yards is far beyond me at the moment. I haven't gotten 6 yet, my best is 4 clean dots out of the 6 and the misses are ALWAYS low. Its really driving me crazy.

This drill is a bit like a slot machine...just *one* more time, I know it will hit this time!

My main things have been gripping very hard and focusing on isolating trigger finger movement and just letting the gun work. I am finding this challenging...

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I cured my pre-ignition push with lots of dry fire and shooting at an embankment, while aiming at nothing . . . just watching the sight and gun.

It can be very enlightening shooting at a back stop without aiming at anything. Shoot slow, shoot as fast as you can and observe.

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I started having this problem with my Production gun. At first, I was thinking it was grip but the more I look at it, I do believe it's my trigger finger. I don't have this problem on my Open gun.

Are there any specific dryfire drills you all are doing or have done to correct this?

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I've been mixing dry fire into live fire lately. This lets me transfer the feeling of keeping the sights still during dry fire, immediately to live fire. This has taught me something.

At my first match, I remember how I had come from shooting with a G20 using full power 10mm loads. I found that applying trigger follow-through while just letting the recoil happen was effective in tightening my groups. I just accepted the muzzle rise with bad grip angles. My motivation with that gun was not to shoot fast, just to be more accurate than I initially was.

Then as I shot some matches with a 1911, I reverted back to less follow-through as I tried to shoot faster, and my accuracy suffered.

Recent dry fire plus live fire steered me toward going back to good follow-through after making sure I'm keeping the gun still during trigger press and not pushing down against the recoil. The result is better accuracy but more muzzle rise if I use my old grip angles.

A new thing I'm working with is focusing on grip angles that are recommended by top shooters but which I find uncomfortable. It is worth the discomfort because I'm now in a new world of much better recoil control while keeping the accuracy improvement. It has taken me hours of dry fire and live fire to get to this point and it will take more to really bake it in.

I see dot torture mentioned. I have the dot torture sheet taped onto a wall at home and I'm using it a lot. I do the sheet as written, plus I get creative with it, moving from dot to dot in different sequences.

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The dot torture drill has made me much more consistent in where I shoot when moving in and out of positions and speeding up. I didn't have the push issue, but if the shots are consistently located throughout, I am sure that means it helped somehow.

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Somewhere I saw a discussion about rotating the palms inward to keep them pressed together. Was that the concept? I've been trying that, along with a definite but not too uncomfortable rotating of the support hand forward, keeping the support thumb pointed forward, relaxed, and off the frame. I also now have minimal contact with my shooting hand thumb on top of the safety; it's resting more on the support hand's thumb-base -- I have seen Brian talk about this. Shooting hand grip applies pressure front-to-back, support hand grip applies pressure on the sides.

These adjustments make sense to me as I seek the most solid, sensible grip that will provide optimal potential for accuracy and recoil management.

I hope I'm getting this. I'll be testing this new-to-me (maybe old-to-others) grip in upcoming matches.

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