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Adventures in Gunsmithing


entropic
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I will post my projects here as they are completed. Right now I have have some basic tools that will do quality work. I'm Mostly working on my own blasters but have starting doing some free work for friends. Here is a slide I did some cuts on. I will get to fine tune the process and cut out a lot of the setup time when I do it again.

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Here is after bead blasting. There was some slight oxidation after blasting, so I will need an air dryer before I can start playing with phosphate finishes.

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The rear serrations were recessed from .025" down to .002" with the front and rear edges radiused and "dehorned" to reduce thumb drag malfunctions. The front serrations were extended with a taper and fade in depth. Also tri-topped, with a slightly different chamfer next to the rear sight. Weight was also taken out under the rear sight. I call these the "Gnyra" cuts. Stay tuned, I have lots more stuff in the works,

Dave

Edited by entropic
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Very cool idea with the front serrations. Also like how you left some material on the sides for the rear sight.

Thanks. I never liked how the rear sights hang off the side on a tri-topped slide. I also never liked how the front serrations do not come back far enough.

Here is how the rear sight fits up.

20150507_211741_zpsvbf9fbn4.jpg

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The factory serrations are 1/8". I extend them with the same spacing. Here is another one I did last night with some new carbide tools... I will never use HSS Cutters again if I don't have to:

2015-05-131_zpszxdules4.jpg

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The pill Gynra cuts are interesting, didn't realize there was that much dead weight in that area, thought it would have reached internals by then...

Excellent call on stopping the tri-top short of the rear sight and the front serration extensions.

When I see things like this, I wonder why it wasn't blatantly obvious to the people who did 90% of what your product ended up at...

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Looks good man. Doing all of your work on a manual mill? No cnc or DRO?

I do everything without a DRO. I will need one for some of the more intricate projects I have planned. I will end up replacing the whole machine since the Burke mill is tough to retrofit. Overheard clearnace is the only reason I didn't get a bridgeport in the first place.

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I'm done doing these cuts for a while. I've done it 3 times with minor variations. The first time took me 12 hours for just the cuts. The last took about 8 with setup, cleanup, and finishing.

20150523_231156_zps4uitbjgl.jpg

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How long did it take you to cut the tri-top if you don't mind me asking? I'm looking for someone to do the exact thing you've done here (in a decent time frame I should add) and have struck out so far

Tri-top is pretty straight forward. Would probably take 2 or 3 hours. Does Cheely still do quick turn around work on slides?

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Put the DRO right up at the top of your "I WANT" list. I do a lot of manual mill work.

Ran without a DRO for a year or so---then MSC had a heck of a sale on Mitutoyo

DRO's. Worth every penny, and it's paid for itself a dozen times over in

the past few years. XY with the separate little 5" on the quill---nothing on the knee.

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A DRO is the most valuable milling tool in the last 100 years. It takes away all the guesswork, aggrivation, and features on the workpiece that are just enough off location to ruin the work. All you need is the 2 axis X and Y, then the separate one on the quill if you want like open 17 said.

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