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Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

I know nothing of Tanfoglio...


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All I know is that the design is based off the CZ 75 platform, and I've really gotten to like CZ over the last year or so. In a recent pm exchange with another forum member, he used the analogy of Honda vs. BMW to compare CZ to Tanfos. That got me interested in doing some research on these guns, as I'm a sucker for euro-lux automobiles.

I'm sure I'll have many q's along the way, but I guess the first thing I'd like to know is which Tanfo models best correspond to the CZ line. For instance, the Accu-Shadow seems to be the most sought after version for Production, and the TS for Limited. Which guns are they for Tanfos?

THanks.

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Welcome! I don't know much about the C Z line however I do love my tanfoglio! to answer one of your questions a stock 2 or 3 would be very sought after for production followed closely by a limited pro. for limited it would be a limited. the model is actually called limited. Comes with a stock magazine well and almost out the box ready for limited. For open you can either go with a gold team. or a limited or limited pro and have a compensator added. there are several post on this forum mentioning the shortcomings of the Gold team for open. I shoot a limited pro that I have converted to open. I love it! I know there are several production and limited shooters hear that will chime in with much more knowledge than myself

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I almost forgot to add if you're looking for the Cadillac of limited guns hunter purchased in 10 millimeter can be rebarreled in 40 add magazine well and you have a pretty soft shooting 6 inch limited gun. I have shot a hunter and both 10 millimeter and 40 they are amazing guns

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It does have to do with the short hammer spring, but also has to do with the location of the pins on the trigger bar and trigger. The DA stroke on a CZ is longer than a Tanfo, and can therefore be made lighter more easily. On the other side of that coin though, a shorter DA stroke has its benefits too as long as it is smooth. I've got my DA pull pretty darn good on my Stock III.

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My $.02:

Technically speaking its not the short spring vs long spring that makes the CZ's and Tanfoglios feel different. The hammers have similar locations for the hammer strut, but in the CZ the hammer strut is close to camming over the hammer spring when the hammer is back all the way. In the Tanfoglio the hammer spring is angled, so you don't get any mechanical advantage (camming over) near the end of the DA. This also applies to the Baby Eagle and older Tanfoglios; they both have the vertical long spring.

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My $.02:

Technically speaking its not the short spring vs long spring that makes the CZ's and Tanfoglios feel different. The hammers have similar locations for the hammer strut, but in the CZ the hammer strut is close to camming over the hammer spring when the hammer is back all the way. In the Tanfoglio the hammer spring is angled, so you don't get any mechanical advantage (camming over) near the end of the DA. This also applies to the Baby Eagle and older Tanfoglios; they both have the vertical long spring.

This makes lots of sense.

Curious if a 15-16 lb hammer spring and a CGW Disco fitted to shorten the DA pull would create a more linear trigger pull and reliable ignition. Thoughts?

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Wow. It's beautiful. But I was ruined on DA (Double Action) triggers when most of you were still in school, because of what some bureaucrats decided would be the best model of handgun (best for the government) for us to be mandated to carry. First it was a snubnose .357 revolver. Who in his right mind buys a .357 magnum snubnose (very short barrel)? The powder is only half burned in a barrel that short and the sound is horrendous without hearing protection, which you don't have because you're executing a warrant (this is back in the day- they probably have hearing protection now that allows them to hear too) at night in a dark room and indoors (which makes it louder) and you have to shoot- then you can't see or hear for several minutes because of the muzzleflash and you can't hear either because of the noise (usually short barrels are louder all else being equal) .

The second genius selection was a DA every shot semi-automatic pistol which had a large grip diameter; I was okay but the women and some of the smaller guys had problems. The only problem I had with it was the long, long, long trigger pull.

But for everyone else who doesn't have my baggage, that's probably the holy grail. I might buy it just to look at it (after the last of my kids gets out of college next year).

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