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Mark 7 1050 Autodrive


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Looks like it has it all but info is missing some major details. I see a price of $2,650 but does that include a press? Think I know the answer to that. If it does not come completely assembled what is installation entail? Sounds like there are sensors to monitor decapping and priming.

Sure do like the jog feature.

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Looks like it has it all but info is missing some major details. I see a price of $2,650 but does that include a press? Think I know the answer to that. If it does not come completely assembled what is installation entail? Sounds like there are sensors to monitor decapping and priming.

Sure do like the jog feature.

Web site states that the press is not included.

Yes I believe it has a sensor that can tell if a primer "sticks" to the decap pin which is a good idea.

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Wow, watched the video and didn't realize a team of MIT engineers designed it...

The dwell feature is automatic in the PW style drive as the lever arm rotates the speed of the ram is fastest in the middle and slows, stops and accelerates in the opposite direction at both ends of the stroke.

Not sure they thought of everything though. He didn't show how it delt with malfunctions, low primers and I didn't see any method of powder check.

Like this one.

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Actually, several people from MIT designed it. I think 4 people from MIT. I've met 3 of them.

I have one and it operates smoothly during the down stroke and the upstroke.

It does not operate anything like the PW. The motor doesn't just continually rotate while a bent arm allows for the over indexing while the machine runs. It also doesn't have a little rubber washer to act as the clutch.

The digital motor runs it exactly how you would by hand but is actually removing the physical activity. When more pressure is sensed versus what you actually set the machine to, the machine instantly stops. With the PW, I have bent many primer punches, crushed cases, and literally agitated the press so much that the powder cap actually burst off the machine , spilling powder all over the place and require me to set the machine up again.

I had a case upside down in the Mark 7 and on the down stroke the machine actually stopped and did not even bend the primer punch. I jogged it back up , removed the case, and started up again. No problems at all. The way it operates is actually quite remarkable. The adjustable speed's and the dwell time make it really easy to use depending on how fast you wanted to be. I was told that sensors will soon be available for the primers and powder. However, On the tablet that comes with it there are imputs for bullets, primers, and cases. So you can set it up to how many cases, primers, or bullets and just let it run to that number.

The set up was quite easy and took just a few minutes. I was actually quite surprised at how simple the set up was. Then when I ran it, I thought the little anxious not knowing how it would react, but it just kept running smoothly and consistently. Like I said, when that one case was upside down in the machine stopped it startled me. But nothing crushed, popped, or jammed up. I simply jog back, removed the case, and started up again with no issues . Then proceed to load 500 rounds that were match grade.

Pretty cool really .....

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Wow, watched the video and didn't realize a team of MIT engineers designed it...

The dwell feature is automatic in the PW style drive as the lever arm rotates the speed of the ram is fastest in the middle and slows, stops and accelerates in the opposite direction at both ends of the stroke.

Not sure they thought of everything though. He didn't show how it delt with malfunctions, low primers and I didn't see any method of powder check.

Like this one.

Actually, I do not believe there is dwell time in the PW, that's just a delay so that the arm can actually cycle the press without jamming it , based on the shaft 360° Revolution.

The Mark 7 has three dwell/ delay times for the indexing so that if the powder volume is very high in the case it will not spill during indexing (ie: compressed load). This is so that when you are loading 1,800 rounds per hour, that you don't spill a lot of powder. And so that rifle calibers will have enough time for the powder measure to fully filled the case and not start indexing immediately again during the down stroke.

The press also stops if the primer warning comes on. So if you're out of primers the press stops . If you set a specific amount of components (ie: bullets, primers, cases ), say 250, The press will keep counting down and stop at the selected number

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Bragging about what you can do, while throwing rocks at what somebody else HAS ACTUALLY DONE is in poor taste. Very common these days though. My apologies in advance if you HAVE actually created a better 1050 auto drive. If you have, I'll take one.

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Actually, I do not believe there is dwell time in the PW...

It's just physics, nothing to believe simply observe.

Using a connecting rod on something rotating, speed of the connecting rod is always changing (just part of going from a circular motion to linear.

You don't have to have a degree from MIT to see that, something that is moving, stops and changes direction is changing speed. The dwell is the point it stops, it slows down before it stops and speeds up after.

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I totally understand that however Mark 7 phrased the term "dwell time" because at that specific Point during rotation they saw I need to have different speeds. PW just uses that part of the stroke to allow the arms over index, to return itself. They call it Dwell time because they are retarding the speed at that specific point. PW has no specific set up at that indexing point other than to just return the arm.

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Good job with those. The speed on the 1050 processing machine is smoking. The 650 is for processing too, right? Have you done one for actual reloading? Or are they all for processing?

Oh , also, is that a sensor between the case feed slide and resizing die so that if a case topples, the press stops? Micro-switch?

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Guys, compared to what the engineers do today in robotics etc. this is not even child play. So it is great that they did it, for this "strange" market, but it is not what would be considered an achievement in any serious company.

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I totally understand that however Mark 7 phrased the term "dwell time" because at that specific Point during rotation they saw I need to have different speeds.

Indexing on the 1050 happens during the last 3/4 inch of the tool head up stroke, to complete that 3/4" stroke with a PW auto drive takes 50 degrees of rotation by the motor vs 20 degrees rotation for the same 3/4" of ram movement in the middle of the stroke.

We know the motor is turning at a constant speed but it takes more than twice as much rotation (and time) to move the ram the same distance during indexing. That is dwell inherent in the design or accomplished without servos and programming.

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Can you post one you made? A few pictures or video would be better.....cool! Thanks!

Sure.

All stuff I've made, but, I'm no MIT engineer, mind you.

Touché.

Pretty awesome stuff. Imagine how awesome it could have been if you had been to MIT!

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