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CCI small rifle primers


KentG

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Anyone use CCI small rifle primers for 9mm minor reloads? I have used Winchester SRP but want to standardize for 223 and 9mm and CCI SRP is first choice.

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I use Tula KVB-556m in 9 and SP .45 at what would be comfortable major and minor velocities (130 PF in 9 and 168 PF in .45) and have no marking on either breech face that would indicate any gas leakage past the primers.

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It's my understanding, and I have no way to confirm this without asking CCI, that CCI SRPs have harder cups than SPPs. With lighter loads the pressure might not seal the primer in the primer pocket and gas can leak around the primer causing breach face erosion.

Like I said, I can't confirm how hard the primer cups are but it's worth at least thinking about.

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Come on darkvibe, that's not very sciency of you :). There are plenty of ways to determine how hard they are, how about weighting them? measuring them? melting them down and analyzing the metal?

If you're not interested enough to look into it just say so, but to say there's just no other way is a disservice to rational empiricism.

I'll admit I've heard enough anecdotal evidence to be curious, but as I load 9 major with Winchester SPP and have never had issues with breach face erosion or light strikes, my motivation is low.

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Come on darkvibe, that's not very sciency of you :). There are plenty of ways to determine how hard they are, how about weighting them? measuring them? melting them down and analyzing the metal?

Or you could just look at the thickness of the cup (0.017" for SPP and 0.020" for SRP) and figure that it would be silly for CCI to make an 18% thicker cup but make the alloy softer so that the net result is that the SRP is equal to or softer than the SPP. I'd bet that all CCI primers use basically the same alloy and the cup thickness determines the cup hardness.

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I've reads on here correspondence with atk confirming that cci magnum spp and cci small rifle (400) are the same, they have a 0.20 thickness cups, cci also makes another srp the 450 that has a 0.25 cup that is better for ar's to prevent slamfires.

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CCI 400 and, RP 61/2 have a thickness of .020. WSP primers have a thickness of .021. None of these primers are recommended for

use in AR'S as they may be pierced with AR loads. Best to use Mag SR or beanchrest primers. I was unaware of this when I purchesed my srp so have been using them in my sp loads with no problems.

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KentG, I just wouldn't do it...I would just stock two correct primers for their applications instead of trying to compromise in the middle and stay with one. I shoot 9Major mostly and found out that CCI SPP works fine in there and in my Minor loads so I was happy that I did not have to stock different primers but you're in a little different situation. There is just a large gap you would have to fill and with primers being readily available, it isn't a supply thing.

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Come on darkvibe, that's not very sciency of you :). There are plenty of ways to determine how hard they are, how about weighting them? measuring them? melting them down and analyzing the metal?

If you're not interested enough to look into it just say so, but to say there's just no other way is a disservice to rational empiricism.

I'll admit I've heard enough anecdotal evidence to be curious, but as I load 9 major with Winchester SPP and have never had issues with breach face erosion or light strikes, my motivation is low.

I'm not interested enough to look into it. :)

Thicker probably means harder but i dont want to speak with any certainty since its not definite. Only CCI could say with 100% certainty. I do think it's worth looking into before using them.

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I have used CCI SRP in 9x23 for years, even for loads down around 125 PF for my Bul M-5 Limited gun. Or at 175 PF using AutoComp behind a 124g Ranier plated FMJ in my STI. I also use Wolf and Tula SRP without much fuss either. I won't use Federal primers simply because I use a Lee press and they don't recommend them.

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Come on darkvibe, that's not very sciency of you :). There are plenty of ways to determine how hard they are, how about weighting them? measuring them? melting them down and analyzing the metal?

If you're not interested enough to look into it just say so, but to say there's just no other way is a disservice to rational empiricism.

I'll admit I've heard enough anecdotal evidence to be curious, but as I load 9 major with Winchester SPP and have never had issues with breach face erosion or light strikes, my motivation is low.

I'm not interested enough to look into it. :)

Thicker probably means harder but i dont want to speak with any certainty since its not definite. Only CCI could say with 100% certainty. I do think it's worth looking into before using them.

From wiki

As flexural rigidity of the plate is determined by the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and cube of the plate's elastic thickness, it is a governing factor in both (1) and (2).

Flexural Rigidity[1] D = \dfrac{Eh_e^3}{12(1-\nu^2)}

E = Young's Modulus

h_e = elastic thickness (~1015 km)

\nu = Poisson's Ratio

So flexural rigidity is impacted as the cube of the thickness. So a few thousanths makes is much more stiff. Ie, difficult to set off.
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