Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Retired and coming back to compete again


BCGlocker

Recommended Posts

I am recently retired and now getting back to shooting again. The last time I competed was 10+ years ago. I really don’t want to read the entire USPSA and IDPA rulebooks. Can someone just tell me if extend mag release allowed in Production Class in USPSA and SSP division in IDPA?

Also, what is up with shooting a Glock 22 with major load in Production Class is now minor in USPSA? Lastly, is there a major and minor scoring in IDPA?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No IDPA knowledge but all production DIVISION ammo is scored minor.

Extended mag release are legal in Production DIVISION as long as they abide by the rules. Yep, at some point you will need to read the rules a little. Appendix D4 lays out Production modifications pretty clearly.

Welcome back!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For idpa the division analogous to production is SSP. Your extended mag release will only be legal if it was a factory installed one on that or another SSP legal model from the same manufacturer. Like putting the mag release from a glock 34 onto a glock 17. Or from a 35 onto a 22.

For idpa in the semi auto divsions SSP and ESP have a 125 power factor. CDP has a 165 pf. If you shoot a "major" pf load in ssp or esp you gain no scoring advantage. A hit is a hit regardless of pf.

As you know, you think of uspsa as how can I shoot as many points as possible as fast as possible. Getting a high hf. All idpa stages have essentially a fixed hf. So with the Vickers, time plus, or now called "unlimted" scoring the idea is still to make the least amount of errors (points down) as fast as possible. A subtle but still distinct difference.

Welcome back and enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, you might as well just bite the bullet and read the rules. A lot can change in 10 years.
You'd hate to go to a major match and get DQ'd because you broke a rule that wasn't a rule 10 years ago, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read the rulebook. Especially if you are going to shoot IDPA. You will be glad you took this advice!

Welcome back to shooting. I shot competitively for 13 years, then was away from it for 20 years! Resumed after retirement and enjoy it very much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you're really going to shoot IDPA you'd better get used to reading their rulebook .... I've never shot it but heard it's like 800 pages and changes every few months when people get too much of a competitive advantage doing something .... :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you're really going to shoot IDPA you'd better get used to reading their rulebook .... I've never shot it but heard it's like 800 pages and changes every few months when people get too much of a competitive advantage doing something .... :)

:roflol::bow:

And this is yet ANOTHER reason I no longer shoot IDPA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys, thank you for the inputs. The fact is I am no longer serious in competition. I just do it for fun and have no aspiration to compete in other than local club matches. I do not want to read the tendious and unnecessary rulebooks; it reminds me work which I am now allegoric to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do not want to read the tendious and unnecessary rulebooks; it reminds me work which I am now allegoric to.

Just make sure you're familiar with at least any safety rules that may have changed in the last 10 years. That's a must!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do not want to read the tendious and unnecessary rulebooks; it reminds me work which I am now allegoric to.

Just make sure you're familiar with at least any safety rules that may have changed in the last 10 years. That's a must!

I absolutely agree. However, i am not aware any safety rule changes. Can you elaborate?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's best to just read the rule book. It's not that long or involved. That way you'll know them yourself, not somebody else's take on them. We're all responsible for knowing the rules, and just picking up a few pointers here and there won't make it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am recently retired and now getting back to shooting again. The last time I competed was 10+ years ago. I really don’t want to read the entire USPSA and IDPA rulebooks. Can someone just tell me if extend mag release allowed in Production Class in USPSA and SSP division in IDPA?

Also, what is up with shooting a Glock 22 with major load in Production Class is now minor in USPSA? Lastly, is there a major and minor scoring in IDPA?

The OEM Glock extended mag release is just the OEM G21 release on the small frame (G17/G22). It is legal for both games. USPSA Production is all scored minor, so download your G22 to a 125 floor. IDPA has no major/minor, just a power floor for different divisions. It is a straight time plus score versus USPSA which is a percentage hit factor. Here is a good and simple plan: Shoot the all the brown targets and steel as fast as you can, don't shoot any white targets, and have fun.

The safety rules are the same as when you stopped 10 years ago, especially the one that says don't point your gun at me!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are minor changes that affect safety rules, but most of them HELP the shooter, not hurt them.

For instance, trapping a dropped gun against your body, etc. outside of a COF, (so your $3,000+ blaster doesn't hit the gravel), is no longer considered "gun handling" and is not a DQ. This was actually changed because our local MD got DQ'd at an area match seveal years ago during a walkthrough when a wire that was part of the stage props pulled his gun loose and he trapped it to keep it from hitting the ground. That's an NROI ruling, but still, it helps the shooter to know that.

Safety areas in level II or III matches now are required to have boundaries on the ground that shooters must stay within. Handle a gun with even one foot outside the box, and it's a DQ. I guess it also helps the shooter, because the safety areas are now CLEARLY defined!! You are either in the safety area, or you're not. No ambiguity.

So yeah, there ARE important changes to the safety rules that you need to know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure why you think trapping a dropped gun isn't considered "gun handling". That phrase isn't used in that way anywhere in the rule book or the relevant NROI ruling ("Dropped gun", 7-14-09). Think about it, the instant you touch it, you're handling it. Yes, you won't necessarily be DQd for dropping it outside a COF, unloaded, but in the COF you're going to have a DQ, regardless how it was dislodged from the holster. We're responsible for the gun, after all.

Also, safety areas aren't required by the book to have boundaries "on the ground that shooters must stay within"; they're required to have the safe direction and boundaries "clearly shown" (2.4).

If I missed something in the rule book, I'd appreciate the citations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure why you think trapping a dropped gun isn't considered "gun handling". That phrase isn't used in that way anywhere in the rule book or the relevant NROI ruling ("Dropped gun", 7-14-09). Think about it, the instant you touch it, you're handling it. Yes, you won't necessarily be DQd for dropping it outside a COF, unloaded, but in the COF you're going to have a DQ, regardless how it was dislodged from the holster. We're responsible for the gun, after all.

Also, safety areas aren't required by the book to have boundaries "on the ground that shooters must stay within"; they're required to have the safe direction and boundaries "clearly shown" (2.4).

If I missed something in the rule book, I'd appreciate the citations.

1. The "trapping a gun" is NOT considered gun handling when it happens outside a COF, and I know this SPECIFICALLY because the issue that caused the NROI ruling involved our local MD. You call the RO, lower the gun to the ground and allow the RO to retrieve it.

http://www.uspsa.org/uspsa-NROI-ruling-details.php?indx=50

As for the safety areas, what part about "boundaries clearly shown" are you not sure about? Where else are you going to put them, hovering in the air? Any boundary is going to have to be connected to the ground in some way, be it a fault line, or snow fencing, or whatever. You have to be totally INSIDE the boundary. That's what they told us at Area 5 last year, and Troy was there, (he hadn't been officially announced as DNROI yet, but had the job.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...