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shock buffs, light recoil springs, and tungsten rods


cpa5oh

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Is it highly recommended to run a polymer shock buff with a tungsten guide rod? I was told they were prone to "shattering" - I don't mind spending the money on a new guide rod now and then, but I also don't want to have it break in the middle of a stage/match.

I don't really like the feel of the recoil with the shock buff - it's almost like the gun recoils in two stages. I'd do without it if I'm told that running the guide rod without it wouldn't make it a certainty that I was going to have to clear a death jam at the safe table mid match.

Second part of the question is whether running a 10 lb recoil spring makes it more certain that I need a shock buff. I think the gun came with a 12 - I like the way the gun feels with the 10 much much better. But again, wouldn't be worth it to run the lighter spring if I'm inviting a gun failure.

Thank you so much for any advice you can provide.

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I think this is another issue where sometimes a part works and sometimes it fails when put under too much stress. I have multiple firearms with tungsten guide rods and I have yet to have one "shatter" in 15-20K rounds over the past 6-7 yrs. I have them in M&P's without buffs and in 19/2011's with buffs. It puts weight where I like it. I'm a fan.

I don't think there is a clear answer to your question about min recoil spring weight or requirement for buff. But, the closer you get to the edge, the more likely stuff will break, tungsten or not.

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I'm running light loads (NRA Action Pistol/Bianchi) but I use a buff as an indicator for when it's time to change recoil springs more than anything else. When the buff starts to show marks, it's time to change the spring. With a tungsten rod in there, it helps keep the gun more steady since the added weight isn't moving.

Alan~^~

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Whether or not a 10 lb is ok for your gun, depends what caliber you're shooting, which you didn't say. If a 9mm, it's fine, if .45 it's bad.

I've had a tungsten rod in my 2011 now for 2 years, and 3,000 + rounds with no problem. If the recoil springs are appropriate for what loads you shoot, you shouldn't have problem.

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I left out some information - the gun is a 2011 and I'm shooting .40 major.

My gun has an STI reverse guide rod plug...the EGW tungsten guide rod I bought came with a standard guide rod plug...not sure if this means I'm going to be prone to problems or not.

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I use a buff too with 10 pounds recoil spring on an sv shooting 40 major for years. Im now trying an aluminium buff from dawson.

That should make the 2 stage recoil go away.

Though i dont feel the 2 stage recoil on a wilson buff. Too busy observing my sights

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so i am shooting a 45 edge and want to find a recoil set up. I currently have the recoil master and would like to lighten the recoil and maybe add some weight to the nose of the gun. I was looking at the tungsten rod but not sure on the recoil spring or if the shock buff would be good to add. Thanks

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I ran an aluminum shock buff tonight - took away the two stage feel of the recoil, didn't have any malfunctions. I'll run it going forward and will just have to see what happens.

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My experience with the aluminum buffer is that while it lasted longer in the gun than synthetics, it still fails, just more slowly, while continually throwing off aluminum shards into the gun's internals. I discontinued it's use after going through a couple of them, as I feared trigger interference (which I never experienced... I just feared it).

-ivan-

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