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Sights not lining up quickly


Sporky

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I just switched to a 2011 and I am having trouble getting the sights to line up off when I present the gun. Seems like I am moving the gun around and wasting a ton of time.

I am really getting pissed about this. I dry fired for 20 mins last night and I couldn't get a consistent sight picture on a regular basis at all! I am using a DAA Rasemaster holster if that makes any difference!

Help!

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Keep the gun closer to your chest then push it towards the target. Bringing the gun up with arms extended definitely can cause major sight alignment delay.

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Keep the gun closer to your chest then push it towards the target. Bringing the gun up with arms extended definitely can cause major sight alignment delay.

This is what I do. Helps me to index on the FS in my lower peripheral as I present/push the pistol out from my body.

eta- this works whether I am shooting my 1911, M&P, or Glock.

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I don't understand how a different pistol would make any

difference in how quickly I acquire the sights - perhaps

It makes a big difference for me at first when I switch. After a few days of practice and paying attention it seems like I naturally adjust.

I would counsel the OP to continue practicing and spending at least a few minutes each day on sight alignment on the draw and during transitions. You might even try some draws (and transitions) with your eyes closed, then open them and see how you're lined up. Correct the alignment and do it again.

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the gun may be defective. I'd be willing to trade you, an even swap, limited gun for limited gun. holsters/mags, etc incl.

work backwards. start w/ a good grip and sightpicture, then slowly work backwards through the draw steps, w/ as little movement as possible. observe where you hands/arms/etc need to be to get the gun back into the holster, then reverse it (go forward).

sometimes we have to go slow before we can go fast. find a spot on the wall, set up on it, close your eyes, and draw to it slowly. see what needs adjusted. this can help your grip, draw, and NPA development.

agree w/ teh comments above about a little bit of a press out vs a swoop up. does not to be all tac timmy w/ the gun under your chin and a straight press, but a little extra time to align before full extension is good.

set an easy par, 1.5s or whatever you CAN meet w/ ease, do some reps, cut a tenth, do some more, cut a tenth, do some more, etc until you get out of control. do a few reps at teh out of control pace then back off and finish w/ a few reps at a pace you can accomplish. do it nightly or a couple times a night for, well, forever.. haha...

you're developing an index, one of the most critical aspects of shooting at high speed. it'll take a while, esp w/ gear change. Id wager your expectations and your ability to see the imperfections have also increased from before...

-rvb

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I don't understand how a different pistol would make any

difference in how quickly I acquire the sights - perhaps

It makes a big difference for me at first when I switch. After a few days of practice and paying attention it seems like I naturally adjust.

Yup, that makes sense. Just a little practice and more time, and it should work itself out nicely. :cheers:

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To break it down try this and program into subconscious. Without a timer, draw and point in ultra slow motion and reverse in slow motion back to holster. Secondly point with your support hand and not with your strong hand palm. Your support hand thumb is far more precise than your strong hand palm. Repeat the slow draw and holster 50 times. Now put the timer back on. You should be right there.

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Thanks for all the advise.....and keep it coming!

The super slow-mo is helping a lil bit. And the consistent grip comment was pretty spot on as well. I stippled my grip this week and I think that my index on the gun is much better now. I wasn't searching for the sights as much for sure last night at the group practice we had.

Oh and the pointing the support hand thumb suggestion made a big improvement as well so thanks for that comment as well as all the others as well. I really appreciate it!

I have to burn in all of these new things and it is taking longer than I expected. I didn't have nearly this much trouble with my plastic gun, but this 2011 is being a b1tch! It really is a great gun and I am going to do very well with it.......but...it is going to take a bit more work than i originally thought. My foolish assumption was that I was just going to directly build on my progress from the plastic gun and just keep moving forward. But the truth is that I am basically starting from scratch. My goal was to make A class by the end of the season......at this rate, I am going to have to triple my current practice level to even get close. I really don't even care about the classification letter as much as I would like to be able to just get to the ability level of some of the guys that I shoot with. I don't care if I beat them, I just want to be in the neighborhood so I am not the scrub at the bottom of the list. I just wanna play with the cool kids!

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the gun may be defective. I'd be willing to trade you, an even swap, limited gun for limited gun. holsters/mags, etc incl.

work backwards. start w/ a good grip and sightpicture, then slowly work backwards through the draw steps, w/ as little movement as possible. observe where you hands/arms/etc need to be to get the gun back into the holster, then reverse it (go forward).

sometimes we have to go slow before we can go fast. find a spot on the wall, set up on it, close your eyes, and draw to it slowly. see what needs adjusted. this can help your grip, draw, and NPA development.

+1. Do some reverse draws. Without the timer running, start with your sights on target and then smoothly and efficiently perform your draw backwards, bringing the gun to your chest, then the holster, and then dropping your left hand. Do it exactly like you do in a draw, just in reverse. This helps me establish NPOA.

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Another thing that helped me when I transitioned from Glock to 2011 was to use a more head up less tuck position. The bore axis is taller so the more relax my trap muscles the better I was able to index and transition from target to target. Keep working. Shooting is like life, we push and push while all the eyes can see is a plateau. Then one day boom it goes vertical.

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Heads up, eyes on specific point on targets. Bring the gun straight up to your eyes. Work at 50% speed, closing your eyes and confirming NPA at times. Test by drawing blind and opening eyes to verify.

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  • 3 months later...

...

I would counsel the OP to continue practicing and spending at least a few minutes each day on sight alignment on the draw and during transitions. You might even try some draws (and transitions) with your eyes closed, then open them and see how you're lined up. Correct the alignment and do it again.

^^^This works for me going from an M&P to a CZ.

Drawing slowly with my eyes closed, getting a "feel" as to where my arms, hands, wrists and finger are. Open my eyes; make necessary adjustments; get the new "feel"; draw again and repeat until you get consitent draws.

Good luck.

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close your eyes and draw. see where the sight ends up, figure out what you need to do correct it so it's straight.

+1

With your eyes closed get the perfect grip and then draw, thus eliminating the grip variable. If your sights are not aligned vertically when you open your eyes you may want to modify the gun to change your natural grip angle i.e. if the front sight is low the addition of a Dawson magwell or arched mainspring housing should move the front sight up. The inverse is true for moving it down. Left or right alignment is mostly a function of how your wrist is aligned with the gun. This is what works for me.

The only thing that ever made the sights naturally align on my Glock was the addition of a rubber insert at the top of the grips back strap. Without it the front sight was always waaaaay to high. The insert was made by Limb Saver.

Ask around and borrow some parts to see what works before you buy, otherwise you end up like most shooters and have a drawer full of stuff that you too will have tried.

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Just practice the presentation part of your grip, then pulling back. basically work from the target backwards. then work back to putting your second hand on the gun and presenting slowly getting your sights to line up... basically retraining yourself. to the new gun.

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