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6.5 - 284, Creedmoor, or 47?


BigGunBarry

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A few questions, what do you want to do with the gun, benchrest, plinking, tac matches or just to have a new gun? Do you reload, if not the 6.5 Creed is hard to beat for quality factory ammo availability, the other 2 your will need to reload for. Do you want a long action or a short action, the 6.5X284 is better suited for a long action the other two are short action cartridges. Do you have a smith yet, I highly recommend www.rwsgunsmithing.com

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I shot a long range match with a couple of other guys that were shooting 6mm SLR (Super Long Range). Shoots 105 Hybrids at over 3100 FPS. Those guns were lasers!

http://www.6mmar.com/Super_LR.html

Doug

a buddy of mine had one made and has since switched to 6 creedmoor, they are a very accurate cartridge but overhyped with what they say it can do velocity wise and the barrel life is no better than anything else in that category

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6.5cm and x47 are very similar. The 6.5x284 is a completely different beast. Hard to compare those. It will have higher velocity, but shorter barrel life. More recoil if you are shooting in Tac style matches, long action instead of short, etc....all are very capable calipers, depending on what you want to do.

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As the other said, it depends some on what you want to use it for. Given the general acceptance of the 6.5 Creedmoor, it's an easy choice because you can buy good ammo and there's a lot of reloading choices for it.

The 6.5x284 Norma is a barrel burner. The 6.5x47 Lapua is excellent, but you will find it's a harder rifle to find or build.

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As the other said, it depends some on what you want to use it for. Given the general acceptance of the 6.5 Creedmoor, it's an easy choice because you can buy good ammo and there's a lot of reloading choices for it.

The 6.5x284 Norma is a barrel burner. The 6.5x47 Lapua is excellent, but you will find it's a harder rifle to find or build.

:rolleyes: How is 6.5x47 a hard rifle to build? It's no harder to build than ANY other rifle caliber.

I have a 6.5 Creedmoor, and if you don't reload, that is the easy choice.

My next rifle will probably be a 6x47 Lapua.

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Nobody has mentioned the obvious choice if he does reload: .260 Remington.

260 is great if you reload, I have a couple, but now that the 6.5 Creed is so prevalent there is no reason to got the 260 route

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:rolleyes: How is 6.5x47 a hard rifle to build? It's no harder to build than ANY other rifle caliber.

Poorly worded on my part. It's not a caliber that I've seen offered that much - or at least it wasn't last year when I was looking at options.

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I'm in the process of getting my FN turn into a 6x47L, depending on Setup you might have to do more to your rifle vs what you would do for a Creedmore build, such as bushing the firing pin hole, and having the firing pin turned down due to the Small Primers.

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Good article Graham. I actually referred to it often when I was contemplating a Precision Rifle.

In the end, I went with 308. You can buy ammo, you can load your own, components are available all over, and you can use this rifle to play or hunt with. I find myself trying to simplify things, and having one caliber in more than one rifle does exactly that. It also limits the learning curve. Is it the hot caliber in the competition world? No, I would say it is the 6mm, and before that 6.5mm, and before that..... I'm too old to keep chasing rainbows, I'd love to shoot the GAP Grind, or similar competition, but in the end, I went with proven performance and fun to shoot. I do not believe anyone is going to give me grief about not showing up with a GA Rifle in the wrong caliber.

Between your three choices, I'd go with the Creedmore hands down. Just because.

WG

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6.5x47 will give a bit better velocity than the 6.5 Creed, but not really enough to justify the brass cost difference. Accuracy is a wash between the two, as is barrel life. We've built/shot a ton of 6.5x47s, yet I built the wife a Creedmoor and I'm building one as well for a backup/practice gun to my 6x47 match gun.

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The biggest difference between these cartridges is how fast they will throw a super high BC 6.5mm bullet. The faster the bullet goes, the more powder it takes to get there and more powder = less barrel life. I can tell you from first hand experience that most 6.5x.284 LR single shot target rifles are built on short actions. I have a R700 and a RPA quadlock and had a MOs rifles(s) in 6.5x284 and all are short actions. If your reamer is throated on the long side you might not be able to extract a loaded round without removing the bolt. You can set up 6.5x284 so it feeds and functions in a short action. The 6.5CM or the 6.5x47 are both about the same in terms of performance, they both have close to the same capacity and barrel life. 6.5284 was the cartridge de jour for many years with NRA LR shooters, i have not been shooting much LR lately but I think its still the most popular ctg on the LR line other then .308.

If you want top of the line performance in a single shot LR rifle then go with the 6.5x.284. If you want to compromise, go with one of the other two. .260 rem (AKA 6.5-.308 or 6.5-06 are close in velocity but are not nearly as popular and would work too.

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Nobody has mentioned the obvious choice if he does reload: .260 Remington.

Because it's not the obvious choice..

best-precision-rifle-cartridges.jpg

41% of 50 is 20.5 shooters. That is hardly a sample size of which a few percent difference is an indication of anything.

6mm Creedmoor and .243 Winchester are virtually the same in performance and there is a large disparity between those two as well in the data.

Maybe I chose words poorly if you thought I was asserting some major ballistic advantage against the Creedmoor; I wasn't. The two are virtually identical in capacity and performance.

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41% of 50 is 20.5 shooters. That is hardly a sample size of which a few percent difference is an indication of anything.

6mm Creedmoor and .243 Winchester are virtually the same in performance and there is a large disparity between those two as well in the data.

Maybe I chose words poorly if you thought I was asserting some major ballistic advantage against the Creedmoor; I wasn't. The two are virtually identical in capacity and performance.

In theory the 6mm Creedmore offers a little better barrel life due to the 30* shoulder.

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Just because of your username, I would go with the 6.5-284 out of the 3. But would consider the 338 Lapua if you really want to go Big Guns.

Seriously, really curious on how you came upon those 3.

Out of the 3, I would choose the 6.5 Creedmoor as you can use it for more than the other 2. Also 6.5-284 eats barrels, and the 6.5x47 is a little light for Long Range.

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Like Jesse I have owned and ran both the Creedmoor and the x47 in 6.5, both are great capable and accurate. If you do reload buy 400 pieces or Creedmoor brass and when the barrel is done throw out the remaining brass as the pockets will probably be loose after 6 reloads. If you do x47 do the same rebarrel the rifle twice then throw out the brass. Speeds are comparable on the two at normal people reloading and using the same bullets.

Disclaimer, you can get the x47 to run 284 speeds but I only know a few people as crazy as me.

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  • 3 weeks later...

One of the best predictors of barrel life is powder capacity and bore diameter. More powder = more velocity and less barrel life. The size and the shape have something to do as well as shoulder angles.

Reference yellowfins question about the 6.5-06 for barrel life, I would expect that its on par with a 6.5x284 but I don't know of many people that shoot 6.5-06 for long range shooting. Its a little on the long skinny side and I think there are better options available if I was going to build a rifle.

The 6.5x284 offers performance in a short action with very good brass available. I should think that in a more "tactical competition" environment, fewer shots in a given period, that barrels would last longer as they have time to cool off a little.

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