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Holstering Technique Safety


Smitty79

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I've been listening/reading about carry techniques and I thought about how that is applicable to my USPSA Production rig.

I'm specifically thinking about how I holster my CZ in a Blade-Tech OWB holster. I've always just put the gun in the holster, pretty much maintaining my firing grip (trigger finger up on slide) until the gun is holstered.

In reading about concealed carry techniques and listening to related podcasts, people talk about putting your thumb on the hammer to detect the trigger hanging up on something and starting to being pulled. I remembered back to when I shot a Glock and an SO stopped me from holstering at LAMR because my trigger might be hanging up on my cover garment.

Is it safer to holster my USPSA gun with my strong hand thumb on the hammer or is it safer to maintain a grip wrapped around the gun as long as I can?

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Not too many situations where it's relevant. Striker guns don't have hammers. Single actions have safeties. Hammered guns must be hammer down in production so you are only talking long double action pulls to worry about?

I say just holster the gun normally.

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I mainly wish that shooters would realize that the clock is no longer running and that they can re-holster slowly. That gives the shooter or RO time to notice anything amiss, such as a shirt tail getting in the trigger guard, or the trigger getting hung on a holster edge.

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I mainly wish that shooters would realize that the clock is no longer running and that they can re-holster slowly. That gives the shooter or RO time to notice anything amiss, such as a shirt tail getting in the trigger guard, or the trigger getting hung on a holster edge.

+1
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I was holstering with my thumb on the hammer before I started competing regularly, so I do it automatically. Once the gun is seated, I re-establish the grip I want on the draw before I move my hands to the start position.

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Range and carry are two different things......

For carry, I use an IWB -- and since I have an aversion to extra holes in my body, the gun goes in the holster in front of me, then the holstered gun gets stuff in my waist band, and the holster loop is fastened around my belt......

Match day: Trigger finger up on the frame/slide, thumb goes on the back of slide to detect any out of battery movement, reminding fingers stay wrapped around the grip. Insert gun into holster, remove hand.....

Not hard to do. If you're new to holstering, or have a new holster, work the process in dry-fire....

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I never understood the "tactical" classes that train to keep your attention downrange and to holster without looking. If I need that much attention downrange, I'll just keep my pistol in my hands, too, thank you.

Keep a firing grip (straight finger out of trigger guard, of course) on the pistol, and LOOK at the holster while you slowly put the pistol away. Especially don't try to use a technique that only works with one type of pistol.

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I never understood the "tactical" classes that train to keep your attention downrange and to holster without looking. If I need that much attention downrange, I'll just keep my pistol in my hands, too, thank you.

Keep a firing grip (straight finger out of trigger guard, of course) on the pistol, and LOOK at the holster while you slowly put the pistol away. Especially don't try to use a technique that only works with one type of pistol.

I have attended many "tactical" handgun classes and not once was I ever instructed to reholster without looking the gun into the holster. These were well respected instructors that most have heard of. If you are ever told not to look while reholstering, run, run away quickly and demand your money back.

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I'd NEVER try to reholster without watching the gun go into the holster. :ph34r:

And, then, BEFORE I let go of the gun, I test that the holster will hold the

gun in place - then I release the gun.

BTW, my last match was the first time I've EVER (in 20 years of shooting)

seen anyone drop a loaded gun - and at that match, I saw it TWICE with

a squad of only ten people. :surprise:

Both were trying to holster too quickly, as was mentioned by MAC702.

No reason for speed at that point - save it for the COF. :cheers:

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I like watching shooters dropping their guns from about 2" above the holster. Only a matter of time till they miss

Miss, or it bounces off.

You know what they say, if you aren't living on the edge, yer taking up too much space...

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  • 2 weeks later...

I mainly wish that shooters would realize that the clock is no longer running and that they can re-holster slowly. That gives the shooter or RO time to notice anything amiss, such as a shirt tail getting in the trigger guard, or the trigger getting hung on a holster edge.

+1

Amen to that! :bow:

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In my first USPSA shoot, i was gently reminded of a mistake i was making. Although i was holstering slow and with proper trigger-finger positioning, i was bringing the muzzle of the pistol too far back, thus inadvertently breaking the 180 degree rule.

Fortunately, i was instructed in the proper way, rather than DQ'ed. Since then i pay a lot of attention to holstering.

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I will interject some thoughts on the "tactical" holstering without looking at the holster. I have not, nor will I ever recomend it. Most law enforcement holsters still have parts like thumb breaks or hoods which can be moved in the way of holstering or even into the trigger guard while holstering causing a not secured gun or even an accidental discharge while holstering.

That being said, I have encountered situations going from a possible deadly force situation (gun out) to hands on (handcuffing suspects) where I did not divert much attention to holstering my firearm. I do teach (it goes mostly ignored) to holster by keeping the gun pointed down range (with the barrel mostly horizontal) while rotating your strong side hip forward slightly (as to not let the barrel go behind any part of your body) then placing the barrel in the top of the holster above the trigger guard area of the holster and then rotating the gun down and into the holster keeping a firm grip till the gun bottoms out in the holster. Then check for retention (on self locking holsters) by lifting slightly to confirm it locked in. Hope the wording accurately describes the method.

Entering from the rear of the holster prevents getting hung up on thumb straps or other retention parts. Having the skill/muscle memory to do it with very little more than a glance down to confirm the holster is clear of debry or other problems could be a good thing. No point can be gained from me for speed reholstering.

Any thought on this?

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My thought is, if at all possible, do not divert your attention away from a suspect while holstering a gun. If I have one or more other officers covering the suspect, then yes, maybe I can divert my attention away from the suspect. But, why deviate from what one should be practicing just because you have backup. Practice holstering while not looking at the holster, enough, and it becomes second nature.

USPSA or any other shooting sport is another story and I wouldn't recommend holstering without looking at the gun and holster.

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No one has discovered a valid reason for speed re-holstering. Yet I see many people in classes re-holstering at warp speed or even worse blowing a shot and re-holstering with "attitude", a recipe for disaster. Putting the gun away should be a slow and deliberate action.

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Biggest thing is to look the gun into the holster. It's really surprising how few people actually do this.

+1

It really bugs when when I'm SOing and people try to holster their gun along with half of their cover garment.

I've also been swept as a spectator when someone tried to reholster, missed the opening completely, and went over and behind the top holster with their muzzle.

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