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First press


nikelax73

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I've been getting into competition shooting and decided I want to start reloading as well.

The huge selection of presses is overwhelming and i'm definitely lost in the sauce.

Not looking at a high end dillon, but also not looking to get a $50 lee single stage either, looking for a nice medium.

Thoughts for a newbie?

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Depends on what calibers you'll be reloading, and how many rounds

per month.

A good start is Dillon's website - it lists some criteria for selecting your

first press.

I love my Square Deal, but I can't reload rifle or use other dies - I

would not use a SDB for reloading .40 major ... :cheers:

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I love my Square Deal, but I can't reload rifle or use other dies - I

would not use a SDB for reloading .40 major ... :cheers:

Why not for .40 major?

Same here, why not? My buddy has been reloading .40 Major for a while on his and never had an issue with his ammo. Thanks

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I started with a Dillon 550. Not sure of the difference between it and the Square Deal that's pretty easy to look up. I like Dillon because they have great tech support. And they replace broken parts. I really needed the tech support.

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If you are only loading handgun cartridges, I would start with the SDB, as recommended above.

If you want to load some rifle cartridges too, go with the 550.

I would not start under those two.

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The biggest difference (price wise) with the SDB and the 550 is that the SDB comes with dies and is $60 cheaper. If you add in dies, there is a difference of about $130, and that's not including if you want to get an special dies such as a U-die, etc. The bad thing about the SDB is it does not take standard dies.

Overall the 550 is the most versatile of the Dillon consumer presses but for someone on a tight budget, the SDB is a perfect solution for the pistol reloader.

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The Lee turret press was my first choice when I started reloading. I've loaded about 15,000 rounds on it and it's still going strong. At some point, I'll buy a better press, but on a budget, it was a great choice.

It's obviously slower than a progressive press but very easy to set up. I can load about 100 rounds an hour, which is fast enough for my taste for now.

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The biggest difference (price wise) with the SDB and the 550 is that the SDB comes with dies and is $60 cheaper. If you add in dies, there is a difference of about $130, and that's not including if you want to get an special dies such as a U-die, etc. The bad thing about the SDB is it does not take standard dies.

Overall the 550 is the most versatile of the Dillon consumer presses but for someone on a tight budget, the SDB is a perfect solution for the pistol reloader.

Another major difference is that the 550 is manually indexed but the SDB is auto-indexing. As others said, if youplan to load for rifles, then you have to move up to the 550, as the SDB won't do rifle rounds.

Alan~^~

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I love my Square Deal - I

would not use a SDB for reloading .40 major ... :cheers:

Why not for .40 major?

Same here, why not? My buddy has been reloading .40 Major for a while on his and never had an issue with his ammo.

If I were to load .40 major, I'd use heavy bullets and fast powders,

and couldn't take a chance on any bullet set back - so I'd be looking

for a sizing die that would tighten up the grip on the bullet. :cheers:

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I love my Square Deal - I

would not use a SDB for reloading .40 major ... :cheers:

Why not for .40 major?

Same here, why not? My buddy has been reloading .40 Major for a while on his and never had an issue with his ammo.

If I were to load .40 major, I'd use heavy bullets and fast powders,

and couldn't take a chance on any bullet set back - so I'd be looking

for a sizing die that would tighten up the grip on the bullet. :cheers:

I'm probably a rookie compared to you in the reloading department, but isn't the crimping die the one that determines the "grip" on the bullet? No matter what your resizing die does, the powder funnel bells the case to allow you to get the base of the bullet inserted, right?

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The "grip" of the bullet is set by the sizing die. The powder funnel bells the bullet for easier insertion into the case .A semi auto bullet uses a taper crimp which is just to remove the flair. The only crimp die I know of that claims to grip the bullet better is the Lee factory crimp die. It acts as a collet and squeezes the case a bit tighter. I've created a set back problem by over crimping which caused the case to bulge away from the bullet. I've also had bad set back problems with a incorrectly made sizing die that was not fully resizing the case.

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