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Anyone else blinks?


crni4

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Or am i the only one :(

I realized i blink recently after reading Brians book. I realized i dont see the sight moving up, nor the flame. I can shoot fast, but i guess i blink faster. It's annoying. And its limiting my improvement.

I am not sure why i blink. I shoot soft shooting reloaded ammo, and shoot 2-3 matches a month for 3 yrd so i dont think its lack of experience.

How do I overcome this?

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I find that double plugging (ear plugs and muffs) helps tune out the distraction of the blast to the point where I hardly even notice it.

I've messed with shooting double plugged and single plugged. Even with something like a soft shooting .45 or 9mm when double plugged it seems like the recoil is less and I focus better. Psychosomatic? Yep, but it works for me, and my hearing.

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Double plug. At least for me. I discovered this by accident last week. I put plugs in and went to the backyard to shoot. It was a bit chilly so I went ahead and put the electronic muffs (no batteries) on for a little extra warmth. And surprise surprise....I was seeing much more muzzle flash than I typically do. I certainly haven't corrected the problem entirely but it definitely made a difference. I'd say give it a shot. It is about the cheapest improvement I've ever made.

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Just did some exercises yesterday with my coach. He had me watch the brass as it was ejected and then of course the front sight. Had me describe what the sight was doing and where it ended up. As he explained to me if you can't see the sights you can't call the shot.

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I tend to blink early in the season. I should practice the following more. Set your target at 7 yards. Put a 2"x2@ piece of tape on it. Aim at the tape. Touch your trigger then back off slightly. Touch it again a little further. Keep doing this until the gun fires. You won't know when it will go off so you won't blink. To mix it up follow the above with one round then follow it again dry fire. It does help.

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Lots of dry fire helped me with this. Trigger pulls against a blank wall.

Before, even when dry firing, I'd notice my vision jar out of focus when the trigger broke. Not quite a blink, but enough to where I probably wasn't able to call my shots very well. This went away with enough practice.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I got over it in just a few days, but it took a ton of ammo. If I was forced to come up with a number, my estimate would be about 1,000 rounds. I was doing it in an indoor range, so the concussion and flash was more pronounced. Looking back on it, I really think it shouldn't have taken that much,

I would fully load a magazine and fire it all with splits about .2-.25 into the backstop. I noticed it was like being around a jackhammer, that once I got used to the rhythm of the gun going off I didn't blink and I could watch what was going on. At first, I blinked a lot and I could begin to see the sights when the mag was near empty. The more I did it, the fewer rounds it took to stop blinking. Eventually, I didn't blink at all, even on the first shot.

As an advanced technique, try doing it when someone else is shooting! Much harder.

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As an advanced technique, try doing it when someone else is shooting! Much harder.

Yeah, helping RO during indoor USPSA practice can help with that real fast. Sometime I find myself blinking early on, especially when open shooters show up.

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