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Gooldylocks

Building Speed Steel rifle

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Most of the open class 22 rifles at the matches that I shoot the 10/22 is the most popular. I think with all the optional aftermarket equipment available it is most folks first choice. Plus, like in my case, I had one already sitting in the safe. I still shoot a stock barrel and have done well with it at local and State level matches. I did have it threaded and added a comp to increase the sound pick up from the timers. I have tried most of the triggers on the market and love the Kidd drop in. It's not cheap but I think the best out there. Like others have said, start her shooting and then you will see what she likes and doesn't like. You can then make mods. Plus, there is nothing better than practice. I've seen a lot of fast times with pretty much stock guns from folks that just have a lot of trigger time.

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How can the cost difference be negligible, when the base model of one is doubly expensive?

The reason is, that there are more things to do with the 10/22. If you want a top of the line rifle, you will replace the barrel, the trigger group, the stock.....a lot of people also replace the bolt, the springs, the charging handle and the magazine latch. There are some compensators that folks *swear* make a small but noticable difference. Then you have fancy sight mounts.

You might also need a gunsmith to tune it after all those parts are purchased. There are about 1/2 a dozen people that shoot in my local area that have 10/22s they have 800+ dollars in the base rifle and the upgrades, with a couple well over $1000.

Again, I'm just saying what top of the line rifles look like. The $200 or so difference in the base price is a small piece of the puzzle. Get the rifle that works best for you/her, regardless of price, and then start upgrading.

Edited by joninwv

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That is true. How light can a 15-22 get? And is it possible to get them to run, no questions asked?

Right now I'm looking at possibly a kidd barrel, home brew trigger job, and allchin mount. That makes the rifle price stay pretty low, and get the majority of the weight savings. which are good things, the way I look at it.

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Right now I'm looking at possibly a kidd barrel, home brew trigger job, and allchin mount. That makes the rifle price stay pretty low, and get the majority of the weight savings. which are good things, the way I look at it.

In my experience, for what it's worth, I started with a home-brewed (read: hand polished stock) trigger job, and a medium-ish weight barrel (the Kidd Lightweight). I eventually upgraded to the Kidd "trigger job" ($105) and the Kidd ultra-lightweight barrel. I saw a far greater improvement in times following the trigger job than following the barrel swap.

As a side-note, when I originally installed the Kidd 18" lightweight barrel, it was before their ultra-lightweight existed, and I did it because I intended to use the gun as an accurate Silhouette rifle to teach my daughter how to shoot. I then later decided to use it as a speed gun for Steel Challenge. A year or so after I started shooting SC with it, Kidd came out with their ultra-lightweight barrel, and it's less expensive, so I think that's an easy choice if you want to switch the barrel for SC purposes... but if I were you and on a very tight budget, I'd get the tirgger first. I never actually used the stock barrel for Steel Chalenge, but I'm confident that it's accurate enough for that level of target shooting.

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That is true. How light can a 15-22 get? And is it possible to get them to run, no questions asked?

There's a gunsmith at my range who is incredibly talented (he's built guns for Max Michel, among others) and he once showed me a 15-22 he built for a client. He'd turned down the barrel, put a carbon-fiber handguard on it, and a HiperFire trigger. I didn't actually shoot it other than to dry fire, but daaaaaamn, was it sweet!!!!! Weighed nothing. I feel like it had a polymer receiver, too. I never saw the gun after that day, but given the quality of this 'smith, I'm 100% confident that the gun runs.

Edited by jkrispies

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That is true. How light can a 15-22 get? And is it possible to get them to run, no questions asked?

There's a gunsmith at my range who is incredibly talented (he's built guns for Max Michel, among others) and he once showed me a 15-22 he built for a client. He'd turned down the barrel, put a carbon-fiber handguard on it, and a HiperFire trigger. I didn't actually shoot it other than to dry fire, but daaaaaamn, was it sweet!!!!! Weighed nothing. I feel like it had a polymer receiver, too. I never saw the gun after that day, but given the quality of this 'smith, I'm 100% confident that the gun runs.
I think they all come with a plastic receiver. That sounds pretty sweet though.

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The 15/22s run very well out of the box. They have excellent magazines as well that are inexpensive (about $15 on sale). Since they use standard AR parts for many things you can really soup them up. The 3-Gun triggers work very well. I'm very surprised we haven't seen aftermarket barrels for them yet, but I keep reading about them coming. The barrel is by far the heaviest part of the gun, so an aluminum barrel would work wonders on a 15/22.

Since there are so many parts for ARs you can really customize them to exactly what you want. I think they are easier to clear as well, in the (hopefully) rare case of a jam.

Edited by joninwv

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Just saw a video of a guy on youtube that had a magnum research 10/22 upper on an axiom stock, he said it weighed 3 pounds with the optic. And I think I belive him, the listed weight for the magnum research lightweight is 4.25#, and the stock alone weighs 41oz (according to amazon).

That is a light rifle right there. Does anyone know the weight difference between say the stock receiver and an alloy aftermarket one (VQ, MRI, etc)?

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Just my humble opinion, but when I look for lightweight parts, it is to either increase cycling efficiency or to better balance the gun to my taste. The few ounces you'll save from a lightweight receiver won't really affect balance because it is mid gun. If you want to reduce weight for other reasons, then that would work. An aftermarket re river may have smoother guts to affect cycling...?

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Very interesting discussion. I've shot my last 3 matches (2 steel challenge and 1 NSSF Rimfire Challenge) with my stock 10/22 with C-More and Bill Striplin's 90 degree mount. The only things I'm currently planning to change are (1) the stock to an Axiom so I can have pistol grip and (2) Kidd trigger. I'm not sure if I'm going to go with the trigger job kit or the actual drop in kit. My centerfire guns are feeling neglected. :)

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My teenage son and I have built several 10/22's for SC. We have used, Cmores as well as Deltapoints. Both work fine.

The weight can be a subjective thing. My son is highly ranked junior shooter, and he actually prefers a bit heavier barrel. We have an 18" Green Mountain fluted bull barrel on his main open 10/22 and he likes it much better than the 16" light profile barrel I typically shoot.

There are good triggers, all substantially better than stock, and you typically get what you pay for. Kidd's are great, but so are the VQ units. The Hornet triggers are a relative bargain. The Boyd's Evolution stock is bargain priced and works well for many folks for speed shooting.

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Well, I think I can get a new bone stock 10/22 carbine for 189. That gives me about 100 dollars worth of a mount and 3 more mags versus getting the threaded model, which should get us setup for shooting. How does the Allchin mount compare to the Striplin? I know the Striplin is lower, but is it enough of a difference to make it worth 30 bucks extra?

Very interesting discussion. I've shot my last 3 matches (2 steel challenge and 1 NSSF Rimfire Challenge) with my stock 10/22 with C-More and Bill Striplin's 90 degree mount. The only things I'm currently planning to change are (1) the stock to an Axiom so I can have pistol grip and (2) Kidd trigger. I'm not sure if I'm going to go with the trigger job kit or the actual drop in kit. My centerfire guns are feeling neglected. :)

I think I will probably wait on getting the stock until we have both shot a few matches with one and see how it feels with a regular stock. The weight difference between factory and axiom is nearly negligible, so its mostly just about whether the pistol grip feels good or not.

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I shoot an M&P 15-22 bone stock with a trijicon reflex sight. Works well for me. I had trouble with reliability intially. My fix? I started using rem-dry for lubricant. all my 22's run great now.

The old guy at the club that does very well at the Sc matches uses a bone stock bottom dollar 10/22 with a 90 degree mount and a cmore. Go figure.

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Well, all that is left to decide is whether to get a 90 or upright mount. Just got myself the gun!

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Well, I think I can get a new bone stock 10/22 carbine for 189. That gives me about 100 dollars worth of a mount and 3 more mags versus getting the threaded model, which should get us setup for shooting. How does the Allchin mount compare to the Striplin? I know the Striplin is lower, but is it enough of a difference to make it worth 30 bucks extra?

I'm biased so I'm not the right person to ask :). I've been working with Bill Striplin on other stuff so I'd pick his mount over any other one. I did look at the Allchin mount though and it looks like it will do the job just fine. I run the sideways mount on my 10/22 and took the Trijicon RMR from my M&P Core and put it on the Ruger 22/45 pistol. I do like the C-more more than the Trijicon so eventually I'll put a C-more on the pistol.

I see that you just got a gun - what did you get?

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The lowest vertical that I am aware of is the Allchin. I found that with a factory standard model 10/22 stock the Cmore on a vertical mount is too high to get a solid proper cheek weld without a cheek riser. The 90 degree mount gets the dot close to the line of the iron sights. I'd definately go with the 90 degree mount and the one made by Billy Striplin is as good as there is.

Edited by Dwight Stearns

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Very interesting discussion. I've shot my last 3 matches (2 steel challenge and 1 NSSF Rimfire Challenge) with my stock 10/22 with C-More and Bill Striplin's 90 degree mount. The only things I'm currently planning to change are (1) the stock to an Axiom so I can have pistol grip and (2) Kidd trigger. I'm not sure if I'm going to go with the trigger job kit or the actual drop in kit. My centerfire guns are feeling neglected. :)

How much higher is the comb on a blackhawk axiom than the regular stock? From the pictures it would appear that it is significant... I am wondering if I would need an additional cheek riser for that style stock, because I much prefer the look of the vertical mounts, both on open guns and rifles (especially rifles). But if I am going to need an additional riser even with that then maybe it would be worth going to the sideways one.

Just went and put about 100 rounds through it today, to make sure it runs before I give it to her. It was having a weird issue I have never seen with any 10/22 ever, it was not going into battery. I would release the bolt and it would get stuck about 1/2" out of battery, and the cases would be all scraped up when I extracted them. Has anyone seen this?

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... I just ordered the Hornet Black Max based on these recommendations!

FYI, I got lucky. It turns out you can easily order this trigger on Amazon.com. And I already had it in the cart, when I, for some reason, did a search about the differences between it and another trigger from the same company, and I wound up on Hornet's site. Well, it turns out the Black Max was the best one, but by ordering directly from them (at $5 cheaper, too!) you can also select an option for them to remove the take-up completely, which is what you want for speed shooting plates. The Amazon page didn't say anything about that. It's a $16 option for them to do the necessary hand fitting, and you have to order it directly from them.

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I have held one and it is comfortable, though it is quite a bit heavier than some of the other choices. Amazon says over 2#

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I just re-read the thread on Rimfire Central and realize you started it. Boy do I feel dumb :).

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I just re-read the thread on Rimfire Central and realize you started it. Boy do I feel dumb :).

Haha yea, I hadn't seen that someone had replied until you just said something. My notifications don't seem to be working properly...

I liked the glacier ridge the few times I've held one, and the cheek weld is good for taller mounts (it was designed for the magnum research gun, which has an integral picatinny rail). But it seems like, without holding them side by side, it would feel significantly lighter to use the axiom. Just my thoughts, probably useless. Maybe I will get one though instead, depends on what the ol lady likes I suppose!

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So another thought I had, was what about using the Taccom 90 degree universal mount on the factory Ruger rail? That would get the scope lower to the gun, but not quite as low as the Striplin.. Maybe it is a compromise? Has anyone used one?

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Mine is a basic 10/22 that I gutted for the receiver trigger group and bolt. The stock and factory barrel I sold to get some money back. I added a tacsol upper, stock, and used volquartsen parts for he trigger and added an extended charging handle(boyd has a good stock for less $$) and you can usuay find non threaded tac sol barrels used for a good price. For the mags I use factory 10 rounders as they just flat out. Work and have less issues than the extended ones. The charging handle I got from on tactical and has 3 spring weights to tune it to the ammo better. For me the 10/22 is better than an ar based one

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