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Stock 1 Trigger work overview and question.


bessy

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Hey guys,

I've read through the various walk throughs here. I'm in the process of polishing up various surfaces and swapping out springs in my stock 1 9mm. I need to keep the gun production legal for USPSA.I wanted some clarification on parts.

Here is my current plan of action.

1. Polish up all the parts outlined in atlas's cz guide, (I've already polished the crap out of the plunger assembly).
2. Cut down the plunger spring a coil,

3. I'm replacing the hammer spring with a Extreme hammer spring at 13.8 lbs.

4. Replacing firing pin, with the henning extra long one (the one cut for the firing pin safety).

5. Replace firing pin spring with the the extreme light firing pin spring.

6. Replace the shorter mag release with an extended one (Like the one that ships with the stock II or match).

7. Throw in a 9 lb recoils spring.

I also have a single piece sear and interrupter sitting around.

So here is my question:

Would you just stick with the stock two piece sear, and delta hammer, or do you think it's worth it to try out the single piece sear and interrupter with the the stock hammer? Any further guidance you folks could give with regard to polishing up the fcg?

~Thanks a ton!

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I just did all that except for replacing the firing pin and cutting the plunger spring. It has significantly improved the smoothnes of the trigger. Only trouble is I use CCI primers and is harder than most so I am getting some light strikes. Just ordered the longer firing pin and dawson sights for it. Hopefully that shoud do the trick. As far as replacing the sear, I am going to wait until I have shot it more and see if I still need to get the trigger better. Good luck to you and would be interested to see how yours come out. Thanks

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Alright guys,

Five hours of my life gone, and here is were I'm at.

I completed the steps I outlined above,

The gun went from around 12lbs double action to right around 6.75

Single action was 4-5 before, and is now right around 3.5-3.75

Certainly in the realm of shootable, but the stock II that jim from shooter ready did for me puts it to shame.

I was able to get these results by simply swapping springs and using a henning extra long firing pin.

No fancy hammer or trigger. I didn't bother swapping out the sear, with a single piece.

I played around a little with other hammer springs, here is what I've found,

The wolf 14 lbs hammer spring was much shorter than the extreme hammer spring of comparable weight, when I tried that out, I ended up with a heavier double action trigger, with more stacking toward the end, but a better single action trigger then with the extreme springs. 3 lbs 4 ozs as opposed to say 3lbs.10 ozs.

I cut one coil off the wolf 14 lb hammer spring, just for shits and giggles. That yielded an improved double action trigger,but there still seemed to be some stacking, it also didn't seem to launch a pencil out of the barrel as well as the extreme hammer spring, so I'm wondering if ignition would get dicey.

I think the extreme hammer springs are the way to go.

I did notice that the firing pin block hung a up a couple times with new henning firing pin, so I'll need to sort that out.

I'd also be interested in what you all have to say about the extreme hammer, and one piece sear.. If they are worth the investment or not.

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I think the one piece sear is good. Less moving parts is less likely something breaking if you ask me. I put the Extreme hammer in my pair of Stock II's and I think it was worth it. The hammer seems to hit the back plate with more force so less likely of a light strike. You have to fit the sear to the safety as the extreme hammer pushes it forward for lack of better words.

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I think the one piece sear is good. Less moving parts is less likely something breaking if you ask me. I put the Extreme hammer in my pair of Stock II's and I think it was worth it. The hammer seems to hit the back plate with more force so less likely of a light strike. You have to fit the sear to the safety as the extreme hammer pushes it forward for lack of better words.

Do I need to mess with the interrupter at all, or just swap out the sear, and hammer? I understand the need to fit the sear to the safety... that makes sense, as the hammer hook locations/geometry are going be changed.

I don't have access to a range in my shop, so here is how I "test" firing pin force. I throw a pencil down the barrel, and the note how height it is tossed when I pull the trigger. This gives me a gross comparison point to look at when I swap parts around. Just a little trick I picked when trying to tune revo's.

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Other than polishing I wouldnt. If you remove material off interrupter in certain areas it can cause the hammer to not go all the way back (that happened to one of mine and I was plagued with light strikes) so I just polish.

Far as testing the force, if the hammer hits back plate and ends up flush and you can't push it forward with hands after you've pulled trigger then fine or that's always worked for me. If you can push the hammer towards back plate after firing then your FP spring may need a coil cut or a stronger hammer spring. Ever since I put the Eric Light hammer and FP spring in mine I've had no light strikes, it's a great combo if you ask me, no coils need cutting. That's what's worked best for me

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Quick question.....Stacking feeling comes due to a long spring or vise versa? ?

Mj

So I assumed that stacking feeling came from a spring that was two long, but it appears that's not always the case. In my specific case, the longer Extreme hammer spring had no real stacking, while wuth the shorter wolf 14lb spring I felt it stacking at the end. Stacking is generally caused by a spring having a non linear compression force, what I mean by that is as the spring compression the amount of force required to compress it further goes up exponentially. This can be caused by a spring that is to long, but that's of course not always the case.

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Stacking is caused by that particular spring being too long for the operational space it is in. Comparing the length to another spring is comparing applies to oranges because the wire diameter and coil spacing aren't exactly the same, even between springs of the same rating. About 80% of the Wolff hammer springs I have installed have been too long.

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Stacking is caused by that particular spring being too long for the operational space it is in. Comparing the length to another spring is comparing applies to oranges because the wire diameter and coil spacing aren't exactly the same, even between springs of the same rating. About 80% of the Wolff hammer springs I have installed have been too long.

Thanks for clarification... that makes sense

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