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CHA-LEE

An Answer to "How do I break down a stage?"

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Thanks for the referral to this from coAR-15.

I'll spend the next few days studying and apply this to the next WPGC indoor.

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Always stick to your gameplan. Dont try to change when you come up to the line last minute

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How much time do folks spend going over stage descriptions in the weeks prior to a match? For example, I am shooting CHA-LEE's Mile High Showdown in June and because he is a top-flight MD, he published stage descriptions shortly after the match announcement went out. My son and I printed them out back in March and have been studying them and strategizing e.g., special skills to practice like weak/strong hand, non-standard starting positions, reload strategies, shooting points, etc. I know its not ideal because I'm not "on the ground" but it seems like time well spent. Interested in others' thoughts/practices.

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Keep in mind stage descriptions, especially those sent out well in advance of a large match, are likely to change once the stage is on the ground. It's a good idea to have looked them over to get an idea of the types of stages, props you will encounter, and any special start positions or SHO/WHO sections. But I wouldn't go so far as to plan stage runs down to shooting and reloading positions. I've seen diagrams that looked like targets were only available from a certain position, only to find that they were available from multiple positions. The few LII matches I've gone to, we arrived early enough the day before to walk the stages in person. I found that helps immensely, if possible and allowed.

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I look at the stage diagrams early if possible, look for different starting positions other than hands relaxed at sides or anything in the stage I think I might need to work on. I have tried to study them but when I get to the actual stage I don't even think twice about the diagrams unless it's a crazy stage or start procedure or something totally different. Good luck.

Edited by a matt

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Its been almost a year since I started this thread. It would be interesting to know if my stage breakdown strategy has helped others improve their skills?

Reading about it and thinking its a good strategy verses actually putting in the effort to deploy what you have read are two totally different things.

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I use your stage breakdown strategy on every stage I shoot and it has helped me tremendously. Once I got to the point that I knew that I had a good plan and would stick with it, I started working on transition speed and improving my accuracy. I still have a long way to go, but it seems a lot easier to work on those things if you don't have to worry about running by targets or what your next shooting position should be.

Thanks again for your post(s)

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Great info and yes, your process does help a great deal when I am breaking down stages. Before I would just kind of go through them, now, using your strategy, it is much easier and I am more efficient. Thanks for taking the time to write this article!!

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I'm glad to have found this thread! I struggle with breaking down a stage and have more than once fell victim to not seeing a "hidden" target.

I have a hard time getting focused on the stage and developing a plan, looking forward to implementing this guide and becoming more efficient!

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Very helpful thank you. I am finding that the mental learning curve is the toughest for me.....

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Especially helpful to me was looking for markers in your step #5... I had a (bad) habit of running to the next area of targets and then moving my feet into the best shooting stance after that... Much better to run to a certain spot and "find" yourself in the correct spot to shoot the targets... I also look for spots and marks on walls... It helps me keep the gun up if the marks are high...

Thanks for taking the time to gather your thoughts and write up this process...

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Instead of looking for a spot or a mark to find your position try looking to your target or where your target will appear.

If I walk into the kitchen to check the time on the clock on the microwave I don't need to look at the chipped tile on the floor or the handle on the second cupboard door above the stove to know I will now be in a position to see the clock.

From my previous 'walk through' in the kitchen I know where to look directly for the clock and I can use my peripheral vision to help me move around the kitchen bench, without looking directly at it, as I walk into the kitchen to the point where I can see the clock.

If my wife has left the cupboard door open obscuring the microwave I can look 'through' the cupboard door to the spot where the clock will appear in my line of vision when I am in position.

When I say I look 'though' the cupboard door I don't mean I can physically see through the door but rather my vision is unfocused on the door and it is ready to focus on the clock as I move into position and it comes into sight.

If this last part doesn't make sense try this - hold your finger up in front of your face, say about a foot away, and in between another more distant object. If you focus on your finger so you can see it clearly and then quickly move it out of the way and look at the object beyond your finger do you notice a slight blurring before your eyes can focus on the more distant object?

If you try the same thing again but with out actually focusing on your finger, or any thing else, rather looking through or beyond it, when you move the finger out of the way and focus on the second object you should be able to focus on it that much quicker and without the momentary blurring.

As the quote in your signature says "You can shoot only as fast as you can see."

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Just saw this.

Thanks for taking the time to post this info.

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I know that this thread is pretty old, but it's too good not to be at the top.  I learned so much from this, and I'm definitely going to be putting it to use at the next match.

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