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How do you remove case lube post loading?


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To get a thin coat of lube try lubing your brass in a small cardboard box like Brian does as per his reloading DVD instead of the baggie. Many great hints and excellent demo on reloading on that DVD. Besides, it's from our forum host.

I don't remove one shot when load up cast lead because the greasy lube on the lead collects dust.

If you accidentally run a loaded round with your range pickup brass use it for practice. But I haven't had one that didn't go bang. :roflol:

Kidding aside here is a SAMMI video about sporting ammo and what happens if it get shot at or burned in a fire.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SlOXowwC4c

DNH

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I don't. I never found a need to remove the lube. Most is removed during handling. Since I don't shoot rifles with rear locking lugs or at pressures over 65000 psi, bolt thrust is not an issue.

However, if you use so much you can feel it, then you can wipe it off with a rag, roll the cases along a towel, or tumble them for 30 minutes.

The only time I have used lube and a carbide die is in 9x19. Even my 9x21 cases have never needed any lube, and they are sized in the same die.

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I use carbide pistol dies and don’t need lube.

You may not "need" it, but it sure does make life easier and the pros outweigh the cons for using lube with carbide dies.

I don’t see how it makes it easier. Seriously, I’ve have been reloading for 30 years now and have never used lube on carbide dies.

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I use carbide pistol dies and don’t need lube.

You may not "need" it, but it sure does make life easier and the pros outweigh the cons for using lube with carbide dies.

I don’t see how it makes it easier. Seriously, I’ve have been reloading for 30 years now and have never used lube on carbide dies.

I used to be the same way until I tried a little Hornady One Shot on my pistol cases. I've been lubing my pistol brass ever since. (Loading on a Dillon 650)

Yes it makes it easier but for me anyway that's not the real advantage. The primary advantage is how smooth the press runs when I lube my pistol brass. A smoother running press simply creates more consistent ammo. It's as simple as that for me.

FYI, I don't bother removing One Shot from my pistol ammo. I use a light coat and most of it is removed by simply handling the ammo although I have been known to toss a batch or two into the tumbler with some corn cob for about 15 minutes. Rifle brass get's tumbled after processing the brass so there's no lube on the case when I drop a bullet in.

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I use carbide pistol dies and don’t need lube.

You may not "need" it, but it sure does make life easier and the pros outweigh the cons for using lube with carbide dies.

I don’t see how it makes it easier. Seriously, I’ve have been reloading for 30 years now and have never used lube on carbide dies.

Well, have you tried lubing cases with your carbide dies? If so, you might soon see how it could make it easier.

Honestly, it shouldn't be too hard to imagine how rubbing a dry piece of brass against a carbide face versus rubbing a lubricated piece of brass against the same carbide face should be easier.

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I use carbide pistol dies and don’t need lube.

You may not "need" it, but it sure does make life easier and the pros outweigh the cons for using lube with carbide dies.

I don’t see how it makes it easier. Seriously, I’ve have been reloading for 30 years now and have never used lube on carbide dies.

I used to be the same way until I tried a little Hornady One Shot on my pistol cases. I've been lubing my pistol brass ever since. (Loading on a Dillon 650)

Yes it makes it easier but for me anyway that's not the real advantage. The primary advantage is how smooth the press runs when I lube my pistol brass. A smoother running press simply creates more consistent ammo. It's as simple as that for me.

FYI, I don't bother removing One Shot from my pistol ammo. I use a light coat and most of it is removed by simply handling the ammo although I have been known to toss a batch or two into the tumbler with some corn cob for about 15 minutes. Rifle brass get's tumbled after processing the brass so there's no lube on the case when I drop a bullet in.

That makes sense.

I use carbide pistol dies and don’t need lube.

You may not "need" it, but it sure does make life easier and the pros outweigh the cons for using lube with carbide dies.

I don’t see how it makes it easier. Seriously, I’ve have been reloading for 30 years now and have never used lube on carbide dies.

Well, have you tried lubing cases with your carbide dies? If so, you might soon see how it could make it easier.

Honestly, it shouldn't be too hard to imagine how rubbing a dry piece of brass against a carbide face versus rubbing a lubricated piece of brass against the same carbide face should be easier.

I understand it would make the case size easier, I was referring to making the reloading process easier as a whole. If you have to add spraying and cleaning brass to your reloading process how much easier are you making really making it. To me it sounds like your adding more work.

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Spraying 300-500 cases with One-Shot, I use a plastic tray, takes at most 30 seconds... then I dump it in the case feeder and I'm ready to go. No kidding, you really owe it to yourself to try some One-Shot aerosol it makes a BIG difference in how smooth the press runs and allows better "feel" during de-priming & priming... and everything else. I doubt you'll ever go back to running dry. I use carbide dies too BTW.

Regarding the OP's question, I leave the One-Shot on my rounds, it doesn't look as pretty but I've never had a problem with it.

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I use carbide pistol dies and don’t need lube.

You may not "need" it, but it sure does make life easier and the pros outweigh the cons for using lube with carbide dies.

I don’t see how it makes it easier. Seriously, I’ve have been reloading for 30 years now and have never used lube on carbide dies.

Well, have you tried lubing cases with your carbide dies? If so, you might soon see how it could make it easier.

Honestly, it shouldn't be too hard to imagine how rubbing a dry piece of brass against a carbide face versus rubbing a lubricated piece of brass against the same carbide face should be easier.

I understand it would make the case size easier, I was referring to making the reloading process easier as a whole. If you have to add spraying and cleaning brass to your reloading process how much easier are you making really making it. To me it sounds like your adding more work.

The time it takes me to lube (a few seconds, maybe ten seconds max) and the time it takes me to clean off the lube (0 seconds, as I don't always remove it, to a negligible amount of time for me to throw them into the tumbler, let it do its thing, and separate the media from the finished bullets, say a few minutes max and it makes gauging easier too) far offsets the additional time it takes me to reload dry brass. Furthermore, it provides the additional benefit/ease of reloading (wear on my machine, dies, and my shoulder).

Edited by RDA
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I lay the completed rounds on a cloth fender cover (it's like a beach towel that the uniform company will launder), then I spray with an alcohol based brake cleaner. Once wet, I grab two corners of the of towel in each hand and and alternately lift and lower each side, letting the rounds tumble in the center. They come out totally clean and it only takes a minute. I use way more lube than Dillon suggests, so stickiness is a problem for me if I don't clean as a final step. I use Dillon case lube and Wurth brake cleaner.

I do this, pretty much, using isopropyl or ethyl alcohol in a pump spray. The stickiness happens with the Hornady One Shot I've used in the past and am using again for the moment. If I use silicone spray (ZEP PAR) I don't have any stickiness, and just leave it on.

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