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Kimbertarget

Why tungsten guide rods break (brittle)?

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If they break how do so many PROs use them without incident, do they change them at regular intervals?

I would like to try tungsten with different recoil springs on my 5" 1911 but keep hearing different views.

You notice less muzzle flip, then i hear there is no difference.

I hear some guys run a heavier spring but get muzzle dip and for fast strings that can be just as bad as muzzle flip so where is the best balance that is used on a professional level?

Then i hear those who have the tungsten male ends break and those who have them with no issues.

So i rather get a poll from all you competitors:

1) what lb recoil springs on a S.S. division 5" 1911 .45cal? What brand to buy? WOLFF??

2) TUNGSTEN OR STAINLESS STEEL 1-2 piece guide rods and what Brand to buy

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I ran a Tungsten rod in my Glock with major ammo for 4 years, never broke. I have an 2011 gun now with a tungsten rod and so far so good.

13# spring in the Glock, 12.5# in the 2011.

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I heard good things about the ZEV TECH TUNGSTEN in glocks but the screw type for 1911s /2011s i hear break alot almost a 50/50 opinion on them. Is your tungsten on your 2011 have a MALE or FEMALE. Threaded end?

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i have one in my G35. yes it's brittle,mine has some marks left by the recoil spring after only couple hundreds rounds,which doesn't means it'll prematurely breaks .....been told that to offer a more solid tungsten , the higher grade alloy needed would drive the price point skyward.

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I think a lot of breakages have to do with improper fitting of the part. Nothing on a 1911/2011 is drop in.

George

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Ive ran SV Tungsten guide rods for years no problems .. year 5 now and have been on diff limited guns still runs great.

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Start with different springs, 14 - 16 lb would be a good place to start. I have run as light as 12.5# in my SS 1911 .45 acp but it tears buffs up quickly. Your results might vary based on your setup and load and you will also find you might have a different spring preference

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If you are shooting single stack division in uspsa,like you have stated, I would be willing to bet the gun would not make weight with a tungsten guide rod .

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Have run them in a few guns never had one break.

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there are some Ti or Sc frame pistols that can easily make weight with tungsten,but i was actually wanting to put it on my misses KIMBER POLY TARGET .45.

I appreciate the responses, to OAKHILL (you in OAKHILL FLORIDA??), i run a wilson shock buff and had no issues so far with 16# but a gunsmith locally says it causes spring issues andi should get rid of it. I take it with a grain of salt because he doesnt like F.L.G.R. Or anything useful for gaming. But is there a way to test and see if the spring binds when using a shock buffer? I would imagine that every coil is not going to be compressed to make a rigid structure when using one thin shock buffer,but correct me if he is right.

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there are some Ti or Sc frame pistols that can easily make weight with tungsten,but i was actually wanting to put it on my misses KIMBER POLY TARGET .45.

I appreciate the responses, to OAKHILL (you in OAKHILL FLORIDA??), i run a wilson shock buff and had no issues so far with 16# but a gunsmith locally says it causes spring issues andi should get rid of it. I take it with a grain of salt because he doesnt like F.L.G.R. Or anything useful for gaming. But is there a way to test and see if the spring binds when using a shock buffer? I would imagine that every coil is not going to be compressed to make a rigid structure when using one thin shock buffer,but correct me if he is right.

A TI frame ? Who makes one of those in a single stack 1911 ? I guess Sc is so pose to be carbon steel or stainless steel, but that is what all single stack 1911 frames are made out of and I know for a fact that most of them are real close to max weight right from the factory

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I think by Sc he means Scandium. Not sure where he gets these ideas from.

Edited by Chris_C

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I just weighed my STI single stack with a tungsten guide rod and it came out to 42 ounces with an empty magazine. So for USPSA you could be ok. Guide rods need to be fit if you don't you may have problems. That's why some guys run them forever and others break them once a season.

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My USPSA legal SS weighs 42 oz with a tungsten guide rod and a empty mag inserted.

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My local gun smith pointed out to me recently a lot of people say they have heard of Tungsten guide rods breaking, but many less have actually known of one first hand breaking. One of those he said she said things...

I am also interested in installing one on my STI Eagle, would any one be able to explain what is required to properly fit the guide rod so it doesn't break, or point us in the direction of how to do so???

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there are some Ti or Sc frame pistols that can easily make weight with tungsten,but i was actually wanting to put it on my misses KIMBER POLY TARGET .45.

I appreciate the responses, to OAKHILL (you in OAKHILL FLORIDA??), i run a wilson shock buff and had no issues so far with 16# but a gunsmith locally says it causes spring issues andi should get rid of it. I take it with a grain of salt because he doesnt like F.L.G.R. Or anything useful for gaming. But is there a way to test and see if the spring binds when using a shock buffer? I would imagine that every coil is not going to be compressed to make a rigid structure when using one thin shock buffer,but correct me if he is right.

A TI frame ? Who makes one of those in a single stack 1911 ? I guess Sc is so pose to be carbon steel or stainless steel, but that is what all single stack 1911 frames are made out of and I know for a fact that most of them are real close to max weight right from the factory
Answer-CHRISTENSEN titanium : http://www.christensenarms.com/products/1911-titanium-frames/ Edited by Kimbertarget

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I think by Sc he means Scandium. Not sure where he gets these ideas from.

You really have alot of opinions but not many answers. Its not my fault your not familiar with the periodic table .

A Sc S&W and a Ti CHRISTENSEN are the two 1911s frames of those materials.

But im sure you already knew that....lmao

Here is the Sc, and no its not completely comprised of Sc since that would be exponentially expensive but it does save weight and as for the CHRISTENSEN they are Ti.

294d88c3ce989a9c6e6fc0b1fa1b4814.jpg

Edited by Kimbertarget

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I think by Sc he means Scandium. Not sure where he gets these ideas from.

i have no idea where you got your education from there CHIEF ;)

Edited by Kimbertarget

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Its not my fault your not familiar with the periodic table .

Not finding it...

post-690-0-92298900-1390425384_thumb.png

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Are "tungsten" guide rods made out of tungsten carbide? I'm guessing so. I've worked with it in many machine shop applications and it can be aggravating. Sometimes it seems brittle as glass and sometimes, when you want to break it, it just would not.

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If you are shooting single stack division in uspsa,like you have stated, I would be willing to bet the gun would not make weight with a tungsten guide rod .

THIS

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Kimbertarget, when you get a chance, show me someone who finished in the top 50 in Single Stack Nationals with a scandium or titanium frame. Any year would be fine. And since you asked - I have a Masters degree in engineering. I've learned a little about materials on the way.

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I think by Sc he means Scandium. Not sure where he gets these ideas from.

You really have alot of opinions but not many answers. Its not my fault your not familiar with the periodic table .

A Sc S&W and a Ti CHRISTENSEN are the two 1911s frames of those materials.

But im sure you already knew that....lmao

Here is the Sc, and no its not completely comprised of Sc since that would be exponentially expensive but it does save weight and as for the CHRISTENSEN they are Ti.

294d88c3ce989a9c6e6fc0b1fa1b4814.jpg

That would (IMHO) be a pretty good carry gun. We (the Texas Rangers) had a pair of them on loan as test pistols for a while. But it would not be my choice for a competition gun...

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Are "tungsten" guide rods made out of tungsten carbide? I'm guessing so. I've worked with it in many machine shop applications and it can be aggravating. Sometimes it seems brittle as glass and sometimes, when you want to break it, it just would not.

Tungsten carbide is not used. It's tungsten alloyed with nickel and copper.

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