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hysupra

DIY Loading port work and welded lifter

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Hysupra and anybody that wants to see one bad$$ Versamax that I did some work on. check this video out, I helped out one of my buddies with his Versamax. Here is the link for the youtube video

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Nice man. Looks good. I wish the 930 port was a half inch longer, that'd be sweet.

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Thanks guys and Hysupra your right I also wish it was just a tad bit longer

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looks good, you could get it looking smoother if you were to sand it with a dremmel. Did you use a file near the handguard?

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Everything was done by hand. Took almost 3 hours, used a few different files, a wood rasp, and sandpaper wrapped around a baseball bat to smooth out the forearm.

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You did good man and that's Awesome you tried doing it yourself, enjoy it. I plan on uploading a video to youtube the next one I mod so people can see how I go about doing it. To achieve the result in the above video took me about an hour.

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I don't think you can tell in the picture, but I tried to emulate JT's Benelli loading port. I took more out the closer I got to the shell catch then made a steep angle so I wouldn't interfere with it.

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Got yah, I really like what you did with the handguard. Hey man check this video out and fast forward to 3:15 in the video so you can see what i was talking about with the dremmel. This video was taking right after I did my 930. If you do what i did with the dremmel your port will be a smooth as glass and shiny like chrome.

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and this is the attachment for the dremmel i used to wrap the sandpaper around. I promise if you do this you wont regret itpost-51323-0-03638300-1390969303_thumb.j

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Opened up my M3000, I practiced with it and will need to grind more off but I wanted to avoid getting too aggressive with the initial cuts. Lifter didn't bite me either but that might change when I open up the front more.

1275753_10202039805014968_1668152331_o.j

1557266_10202039804774962_1721818798_o.j

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Opened up my M3000, I practiced with it and will need to grind more off but I wanted to avoid getting too aggressive with the initial cuts. Lifter didn't bite me either but that might change when I open up the front more.

1275753_10202039805014968_1668152331_o.j

1557266_10202039804774962_1721818798_o.j

this looks very clean.

were your initial cuts with a file or did you dremel right off the bat?

i like how you angled the beveled edges from where the trigger group starts. i believe i will be emulating the same lines.

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I tried using a dremel but I gave up on it after about two minutes. Those tools suck.

I ended up using a drill with metal grinding bit to do the major shaping work. The shape of the bit itself helped determine the contour by the trigger. Edit: Added pictures of the actual tools I used.

153910-0-0-0.jpg

Once I got the general shape I wanted, I used a 90° die grinder air tool with a 3M roloc disc on it to smooth out the grind marks. I used the green sanding disc, it's not too aggressive and the bigger shape helps keep things flat. Once all of the big marks were gone, I used emory cloth and 600 grit sandpaper to finish things off.

Basically I used the tools I have and I'm comfortable using. I've used roloc discs on a ton of different things, so I'm confident in using those tools on my shotgun. Use whichever tools you feel confident in. Go slow and you'll get the result you want.

Edited by CarRacer

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Opened up the front of the port more and that made a HUGE difference. Getting that follower unshrouded is key to loading quickly.

892339_10202059136618246_1925541282_o.jp

1014871_10202059152058632_554023302_o.jp

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getting the follower unshrouded correctly is the difference between a great job and "ah shit" I ruined my gun!!!! be very careful, handtools help a lot here due to no removing stuff too quickly.

you really only need about .10-.15 clearance to help get the round seated in front of the shell stop, when trying to load quickly. Some guns will allow more to come off, the key is knowing when to stop and try it before proceeding further.

Also removing any sharp edges, sometimes people get hung up on beveling to make a "funnel" and simply create more sharp edges.

CR, You did a nice job of avoiding the serial number as well.

Trapr

Edited by bigbrowndog

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Here are the results for loading port work I did this weekend on my recently acquired Stoeger M3000.

photo2_zps02c853e0.jpg

photo1_zps9fdd075c.jpg

Loads up slick with deuces.

And I've yet to fire a shot.

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snipersyn, looks good. Did you start filing across both sides of the loading port to reduce the depth before beveling the edges?

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Nice work, your cuts by the trigger guard are way smoother and uniform than mine.

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snipersyn, looks good. Did you start filing across both sides of the loading port to reduce the depth before beveling the edges?

Thanks. Yes, exactly. Filing across both sides maximizes that the edges are level.

Nice work, your cuts by the trigger guard are way smoother and uniform than mine.

I went slow to ensure I made the cuts I wanted. I'm pleased with the results.

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This might be a stupid question, but on polished lifters and other internal parts, how do you avoid rusting? Reason i ask is that I got my lifter welded by C-Rums, who blued it afterwards but in wear areas it rusts. So I wanted to polish it after I finish opening the loading port, but that means that all the blueing is going to come off, leaving the metal exposed. Any recommendations or experience on how to keep those nice polished parts from rusting?

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Here's my work on my Stoeger M3000. A little rough but I'm going to take some steel wool to it and hopefully get it nice and purty.

port1.jpg

port2.jpg

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