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155 or 180 bullet for minor Glock 22


kmaultsby

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I am trying to finalize bullet and manufacture I am shooting a Glock 22 witch I will using for IDPA SSP\ESP and IPSC until I purchase my Glock 35 for limited. I know I will be shooting major PF with the 35 but for now I will me shooting minor. In my Glock 22 I am using a 15lb recoil spring and I have order a 13lb just in case. But should I go with 155 grain bullet or stick with 180 for minor? :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

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180

I have shot about a gazillion 180g rounds through 40 caliber Glocks. Both major and minor. 180's work great. Feel great at minor. Only difference between major and minor is how much powder I put in the case. So, not only do they work great, they make your reloading easier and your component buying easier.

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Nope, I use 180s over WSF for .40 major. I have batches of .40 minor with 155s and 165s loaded with E3 awaiting their chrono sessions. I have about 30 loads worked up of .308, .414 SuperMag, .450BM and .300 Blackout sitting in front of them, plus setting up for R&D of the .450 Corvette and finishing an article for RECOIL, so it might be a bit before I get to them.

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I agree on the 180's. I am using 3.6 of e3 right now for minor and have tried every other combination out there. The closest load that I can find that is almost as soft, clean and accurate is 3.2 of Clays. I have found e3 to be my favorite powder for 9mm and .40 and am now working up a load for .45 ACP that I believe will take the place of the Clays load I have been using. I said the 155 load would be interesting but I don't see me changing.

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Guy's what is e3

Alliant E3 is a shotgun powder made for high volume shotgun shooters. It is a rather low density, low charge weight (and thus economical and hard to overcharge) powder with no manufacturer pistol data. They are working on it though and some people really like it.

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When down loading the 180 to make minor, do you try to get to as close as possible to 125 PF, just below 165 PF or somewhere in the middle? Big spread between 125 PF and 165 PF.

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It's a matter of preference really. A 155 is gonna move faster at the same power factor of a down loaded 180. The 180 will be much softer shooting and the 155 a lil more snappy. It's all in what you want as far a recoil. A slightly slower slide speed will be had with the 180s over 155s as well which can interfere with follow up shots and transitions if your fast enough. For a speed shooter the 155-65 is what I see being used.

Just my 0.2c

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A slightly slower slide speed will be had with the 180s or 155s as well which can interfere with follow up shots and transitions if your fast enough. For a speed shooter the 155-65 is what I see being used.

Just my 0.2c

I've got to throw the BS flag on that one. ;)

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A slightly slower slide speed will be had with the 180s or 155s as well which can interfere with follow up shots and transitions if your fast enough. For a speed shooter the 155-65 is what I see being used.

Just my 0.2c

I've got to throw the BS flag on that one. ;)

Ok...it's like I said just my opinion not the gospel

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I have shot a truck load of 180 TC Missouri's ahead of 3.5 grains of Titegroup. I can't remember the speed or the PF but it is a middlin' load (well above minor, not near major). I like it a lot although under the right conditions it can be smoky. It usually does not bother me though unless I am standing in one shooting spot for a lot of rounds and there is NO wind. I have video of me shooting it and the slide kind of meanders back and forth only rasing an inch or so. I cannot outrun it however and can get back on target quick. I am throwing them out of a XDm 5.25 with stock spring (18 lb).

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Using stock springs, in a 96G Elite and Elite2, I had a reliable running .40 minor load with 850fps with 165 grain, a PF of 140.

It was not the soft recoil I was shooting for.

165s at 775-825 were not reliable cyclers for me,

and neither were 180s at 710.

I also had issues with powder blow back with the light loads (WAP)

I tried a fast powder (Bullseye- and no blow back), but still no reliable at those slow velocities.

At least on Berettas, it seems you have to go to lighter springs for the 127-133 PF.

When someone nails that 127.5ish PF in .40 minor in their gun, and it's reliable, it is the softest perceived recoil and the only competitive reason to use .40 in production.

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It's a matter of preference really. A 155 is gonna move faster at the same power factor of a down loaded 180. The 180 will be much softer shooting and the 155 a lil more snappy. It's all in what you want as far a recoil. A slightly slower slide speed will be had with the 180s over 155s as well which can interfere with follow up shots and transitions if your fast enough. For a speed shooter the 155-65 is what I see being used.

Just my 0.2c

Just to add. I purchased a 13 and 15 pound recoil spring. The 13 works good with the low power factor 180gr bullets so far.

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I don't think it matters much. Most of this past season I shot 140 grain bullets with 3.8g Clays from a stock G22 and made M in production. I didn't see any difference in splits using different bullet weights. 40's at 133 PF with any bullet weight just doesn't have much recoil.

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