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BulletWhisperer

Adjusting your Game

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Top shooters know what others are doing and adjust their game. I don't know I wouldn't do that.

 

The only reason why I would say no, is that I'm not at that level yet, so It would be a distraction. So, if I was competing with other B's, I'd like to know how they're shooting, so I know if I have to take some risks, or none, for example.

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Well,  don’t play defense in our game so it’s all about how well we can shoot on that day.  

I do compare my scores and shooting to better shooters and when I can actually see what they're doing better I’ll watch and maybe video them. Then I add whatever it was to my practice along with my usually routine.  

 

I wonder how much it would change the way we think and shoot each stage if we had ea division shoot with the same class of shooters.  Prod A shooters shoot with only Prod A shooters and so on through ea class then do each other divisions the same. That might be to much of a pain in the ass to actually try anyway.  

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I do not think that noticing how your competitors are doing and how the course is impacting them is inconsistent with shooting your game. Knowing your competitors' strengths and weaknesses is a valid way to assess how you should attack a particular stage. Making adjustments and decisions about how to address a challenge in the match in part based on where you are relative to others and how they faired with the challenge based on their chosen approach, can assist you in coming out on top. This assumes that at least one goal in every match is to win. I regularly will shoot certain stages conservatively if I saw my top competition just blow it and I know a solid, no-screw-up run will put me beyond reach. On the other hand, if I am behind and running out of stages to catch up, I will push - look for a way to avoid a reload, risk forcing a standing reload for th possible reward of a faster time if I can nail it on that last magazine, etc. Top competitors in all sports do this, including team sports like football. You are in a contest. You are not performing in a vacuum. "Shoot your own game," and "you are your own competition" are phrases that mean you have to figure out how best to attack the challenge of winning based on what you know and can do. Your competitors and their performance and potential abilities are part of the challenge of winning. Otherwise, practice stages by yourself would be just exciting as competition. I know that is not the case for me. Also, being able to adjust to the changing demands and perform well on demand is part of the mental challenge. Feel the pressure, deal with it, refocus it into motivation and clarity. Don't hide from it.

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7 hours ago, lawboy said:

I do not think that noticing how your competitors are doing and how the course is impacting them is inconsistent with shooting your game. Knowing your competitors' strengths and weaknesses is a valid way to assess how you should attack a particular stage. Making adjustments and decisions about how to address a challenge in the match in part based on where you are relative to others and how they faired with the challenge based on their chosen approach, can assist you in coming out on top. This assumes that at least one goal in every match is to win. I regularly will shoot certain stages conservatively if I saw my top competition just blow it and I know a solid, no-screw-up run will put me beyond reach. On the other hand, if I am behind and running out of stages to catch up, I will push - look for a way to avoid a reload, risk forcing a standing reload for th possible reward of a faster time if I can nail it on that last magazine, etc. Top competitors in all sports do this, including team sports like football. You are in a contest. You are not performing in a vacuum. "Shoot your own game," and "you are your own competition" are phrases that mean you have to figure out how best to attack the challenge of winning based on what you know and can do. Your competitors and their performance and potential abilities are part of the challenge of winning. Otherwise, practice stages by yourself would be just exciting as competition. I know that is not the case for me. Also, being able to adjust to the changing demands and perform well on demand is part of the mental challenge. Feel the pressure, deal with it, refocus it into motivation and clarity. Don't hide from it.

That's exactly how it is. Champions shoot depending on their competitors. Go ask Grauffel, Michel, or any other. No, most of them are NOT playing their own game

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2 hours ago, xdf3 said:

That's exactly how it is. Champions shoot depending on their competitors. Go ask Grauffel, Michel, or any other. No, most of them are NOT playing their own game

Well, my point is a little different.  I am saying that processing, analyzing the dynamic situation and adjusting your actions for maximum potential success is a part of any serious competitor's "game."  It has to be.  You cannot ignore the chessboard and still expect to win a game of chess.  Now, if someone just wants to go out there and see what they can do, then that is not competition.  That is using a match as practice or training and you might as well save your match fee and just do that on your own.  My opinion.

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