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Video critique west Texas benefit match.


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I know there is a forum for video crtitque but since this is multigun i figured i would post it here.

This past weekend I went and shot the west Texas benefit match put on by ar15 targets. It was a great match raising money for a good cause.

In the past I have always focused heavily on accuracy, I didn't move slow but I didn't move as fast as I could of. Since this match had a prize table based on raffle I figured I would try a few new things such as a red dot instead of a 1-4x and really push my speed and see if I could keep my accuracy while going fast.

I have video of me from a couple of the stages I was wondering if y'all could look at for me and tell me what you thought.

Stage 1

Shot clean cardboard

The stell was sloppy but I got the job done.

Stage 2

Clean rifle and pistol

And I felt really good about my pistol steel

This stage felt the best of the whole match (it was the last)

Stage 4

1 mike on pistol cardboard

Rifle was clean

Thanks for the help guys, any and all critism would be helpful.

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First let me say due to having an equipment issue my match was a train wreck, I can't see Iron Sights but when I had to put the open gun away I didn't quit.

Stage one: With a mag capacity of 18-19 it would be shot from two position instead of 3, this cuts a lot of start stop time, the first being just past the expansion joint in the side walk between the poppers and the paper, come in with gun and eyes on target, take left 3 paper go to the steel, explode out of that position reloading come into last position just before the steel (another expansion joint in side walk) take the far paper (your gun was pointed at them on they way in right) then work your way back to the left take the poppers and the right 3 targets in the center array.

Stage 2: For a young guy, you don't move that fast, when you fired the last rifle shot your weight should have been on the left foot so the right foot could have moved off quicker, once you had drawn and fired on the first target the rest could have been engaged on the move (practice the groucho marks walk), when the last paper was engaged being on the right orange line all the poppers were visible I took them from there with the open gun no challenge, that was my only stage to shoot the open gun.

Stage 4: As a general rule your time will go down when you draw to the easier target, that was the close one, shooting long to short is good for controlling your speed, when you have more targets, as most shooters increase speed as they shoot arrays. On the run to the center position you got there but you weren't ready to shoot, two steps out you should have looked at you landing spot got your head and eyes up and the gun on the first target you were going to engage, this saves time. I positioned my rifle practically pointed at the first target and positioned such that I did not need to turn my body as I picked the rifle up and engaged that first target just before the instant the rifle butt hit my shoulder, no need for sight picture at 4 feet.

This game takes a while to grasp, especially when you are shooting well and getting whipped like a rented mule, it takes time to build all the essential skills, Positioning, and it needs to be finite, at one spot you can see 3 targets two inches to the left you see all 4, saving movement. Movement skills, its not how fast you get there it is how fast you get there ready to shoot, if its a box you should be shooting when the trailing foot is still in the air coming into the box, not get there turn, raise gun, take site picture etc. Stage break down, figuring out how to run the stage to get the most out of your positioning, moving, and shooting skills. The idea is to be shooting as much of the time on the stage as possible, listen to a good shooter go thru a stage then listen to a not so good shooter on a stage, those silent pauses are the difference.

Ok hope that helps, I'm sure you whooped me in the match almost everone did, I left like a rented mule tail between my legs. Next time I'll bring an extra holster, not just an extra pistol and rifle.

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Thank you very much for the response, im sorry your open class holster went down.

I just have a few questions for you.

stage 1 your recommending to move as soon as the buzzer sounds and moving to the first location your recommending shooting from?

Stage 2 I was moving a little slow cause of the rain making everything slippery. And I know I need to work on my walking and shooting. I was walking while shooting that array of pistol cardboard, I just wasn't walking fast enough to be where I needed to be when I was ready to start shooting the steel.

Stage 4 could you expand a little on the shooting close first vs far first. I started on the far popper because I have a hard time slowing down on far targets once shooting close targets first. Are you recommending shooting the rifle targets close to far also?

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Hey, I don't know your experience level, but it looks like you are doing good.

And you had fun, right.

Ron pointed out some things that can be improved but take the time to review your videos and you will discover a lot that you "know" you can do better.

Good luck to the team.

Bill

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Thank you very much for the response, im sorry your open class holster went down.

I just have a few questions for you.

stage 1 your recommending to move as soon as the buzzer sounds and moving to the first location your recommending shooting from?

Stage 2 I was moving a little slow cause of the rain making everything slippery. And I know I need to work on my walking and shooting. I was walking while shooting that array of pistol cardboard, I just wasn't walking fast enough to be where I needed to be when I was ready to start shooting the steel.

Stage 4 could you expand a little on the shooting close first vs far first. I started on the far popper because I have a hard time slowing down on far targets once shooting close targets first. Are you recommending shooting the rifle targets close to far also?

Stage 1: Yes, on beep STEP as you draw move right about half way between the poppers and paper, you are moving right as you ease into postion the gun is naturally pointed towards the paper. This position also un-hid all popers so no time waiting or makeing extra transitions. The second set of poppers had no such position at best one was still hidden.

Stage 2: I almost forgot about the slippery, I had a little traction break on one take off. Shooting on the move takes practice and good judgement. Knowing when not to do it, like when No Shoots are close etc. But to practice get a few poppers rig them where they will not fall. Get two barrels place them far enought out to be safe. The drill is to do figure 8's around the barrels while shooting the poppers. Try it in both directions. This will get you shooting on the move with just a little practice. You kind of took a step shooting on the move but not really. I took a shoot on the move class with BJ Norris, found out I ben doing shooting the targets in the wrong order when moving sideways, so we can always learn a new trick. The barrel drill is Phil Straiters teaching method it works.

Far to Near vs Near to Far: A shooter has a tendency to shoot faster as they shoot, so if you start fast close by the time you get to the far targets you are going way too fast. On this stage for the pistol there were only two targets to accelerate on, then the steel which was not a moderately difficult shot, it was a darn hard shot so you had to slow down. The two remaining were on the same plane and open so they were moderate difficulty, at 50 yards they would be hard shots. From the draw you could engage the near target much faster, even shooting a borrowed gun with sights I couldn't see I hit it without out even attempting a sight picture, NPA, natural point of aim. By the second I had found the fuzzy green thing, went for the popper missed continued on the other two came back to the popper missed again and went on. I was borrowing ammo as well so trying not to get too deep in debt. Did I say slowing down is one of the hardest things to learn, for this go to a steel challenge match, you will get humbled, when you don't slow down.

I think you missed the point on the rifle, Its called transitions, getting in and getting the gun up I was on target just point shot the first one, then finished gathering up the rifle and finished up. On paper at under 25 yards (in a match of two holes anywhere) you don't take much time to aim. As opposed to picking the rifle up turning aiming for the long shots working the way back, that puts an extra transition into shooting the array, and a transition is probably .42 seconds if you are fast. Its back to that being ready to shoot when you get there, which way were you facing? Well coming across I was facing that first target and my gun lay there on the barrel pointed right at it, the wrist position was good. This bring up another good point, when you pick up a gun your eyes need to be on the gun just until your hands are on it then eyes go to target as gun is raised. When you put a gun down for a pickup start paying attention to your wrist position to pick it up, place it where your wrist will be straight, makes it easier and faster, just a few .01s of a second.

example Shooter a does the stage in 15 seconds you take 30, if you look at the timer you will find that the biggest differences are between the shots, not the two on a target but between the last shot on one and the first on the next the transitions, but where this gets huge is from one target array to the next, so the way you catch up is just a 1/2 second here and there.

I think you guys are doing well but there are lots of small tiny things that come into this game, that is why there are so few Grand Masters and so many B and C class shooters. (uspsa). I've had a few classes, Phil Straiter (uspsa pres) is a good instructor, I learned a lot from him. I've go a few more months of SR then I'll be a bad a Super Senior, its a bit hard for a guy my age to run with a youngster 55 year old.

Good luck, and see you at the next match down the road.

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As long as you are having fun, that is all that counts.

I agree your transitions need work.

On stage two I noticed your splits on rifle paper vs pistol paper were way slower.

You start on steel from what I can tell. When you swing to the right it appears you are engaging wide open paper with the rifle.

If that paper was wide open, then compare your rifle shots to the pistol paper you engage after.

Your rifle cadence should match the pace of your pistol shoots.

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Thank y'all very much for the help.

Do y'all have any suggestions for practicing transitions dry firing or that doesn't use a lot of rounds. Being in college and on a budget really limits my live fire practice.

Edited by Dewberry
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For pistol use some pasters on the wall. When I was serious I'd have paster courses set up in a couple rooms and run them with a partime on the timer. The small target makes you aim. I've not tried it with rifle but you could d0 something similar. I use to do two 15 minute sets a day. Phil told me to practice with a revolver, but I've not done it. I made B class in two divisions then got busy with work and life.

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