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Primer Not Punching Out - Metal Ring Left Behind in Primer Pocket


BillChunn

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Dillon 650 press. Brass is nickel plated Speer, range pickup, supposedly once-fired. When the primer is knocked out in the first station, there is a metal "ring" being left behind in the primer pocket, preventing the new primer from going in and seating correctly. With additional effort, sometimes the new primer will go in, other times it will crush and mangle.

What gives?

Could this be crimped primer LE/military brass?

Will Dillon's Super Swage 600 knock these all the way out?

Thanks,

BC

Super_Swage_600_m.jpg

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Yes...

OK, found a couple of YouTube videos on how it works. It appears that the primer has to be knocked out first before the swage operation. My question is where does that additional ring of metal go? Is it knocked out or just compressed into the primer pocket? Or am I just missing something all together.

Thanks,

BC

Edited by BillChunn
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When you buy a 1050 it comes with little tiny brass fairies in the box. When you open the box, they disperse in your reloading room. They venture out at night and sort out all of the bad brass and discard it so that only perfect brass goes into your press and perfect rounds come out.

They are invisible to inexperienced reloaders though. Let me know if you see them.

PS - don't open the box in your bedroom instead of your reloading room. I won't tell you what they do in there but you don't want it to happen.

Edited by latech15
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Are you sure there is a ring left from the primer? Usually with crimped brass, the whole primer is pushed out in the normal size/deprime operation. This leaves a sharp edge on the case that is still crimped over a little smaller than a new primer making it almost impossible to seat a new primer. This is where the swaging tool comes in. However, I would never buy a tool like you referenced in the first post to swage pistol brass. I do have one for rifle brass, but pistol brass is to easy to come by to make it worthwhile. However, like someone mentioned, the 1050 has one built in so it's no extra effort. If you have an unlimited supply of the swaged brass, it might be worthwhile to upgrade your press!

Mike

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I bought some nickel brass off of gunbroker that was so corroded every 10-15 strokes this would happen. It would either partially punch out the primer or I would get that ring that you describe. I was loading on a 550 so I would just throw those brass out as I was loading. I was not pleased with that batch of brass.

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Ok, guys he isn't smoking crack and reloading, I have seen a couple of those in the last 2000 rd of 223 brass I loaded, range brass. With my reading glasses and a magnifying glass I pulled that little ring out with a scraping pick, like the dentist cleans your teeth. A 1050 or a Swagger won't fix that problem as my Dillon swagger didn't it wasn't till It wouldn't take a primer I pulled it out of the press for inspection..

Beyond this I know nothing. I never saw any in pistol brass.

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I think, as mentioned above, that it primarily occurs in brass that has been laying around and gotten wet. Some sort of corrosion or a chemical reaction with the primer residue weakens the primer and also may stick part of it (the ring) to the case so that when it is deprimed it only pushes out the center portion of the primer. If you are short of brass you can pick it out, as also mentioned above,

but you can't remove it by swaging the case (primer pocket). Or you can discard it, or save to sell for scrap.

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Had that exact problem a while ago in a batch of .45 ACP range brass. It was old and had been on the ground for awhile, and my theory was that the primer had corroded itself into the primer pocket. The decapper punched out the anvil and top of the primer cup, leaving a perfect little ring in the primer pockt. It was the sides of the primer left behind. There was no indication this had happened, except when you try to seat a new primer. Tried using a pick to get it out, with zero success rate. They went to the scrap bucket.

See attached image:

post-10770-0-41944800-1370530511_thumb.j

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I think, as mentioned above, that it primarily occurs in brass that has been laying around and gotten wet. Some sort of corrosion or a chemical reaction with the primer residue weakens the primer and also may stick part of it (the ring) to the case so that when it is deprimed it only pushes out the center portion of the primer. If you are short of brass you can pick it out, as also mentioned above,

but you can't remove it by swaging the case (primer pocket). Or you can discard it, or save to sell for scrap.

This has been my experience with a few thousand rounds of brass I let sit out over the winter before I picked it up. I just keep a bucket by the press and drop these in with spent primers. I give the bucket to the nearest scrap metal scavenger when it fills up.

BB

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Ok, guys he isn't smoking crack and reloading, I have seen a couple of those in the last 2000 rd of 223 brass I loaded, range brass. With my reading glasses and a magnifying glass I pulled that little ring out with a scraping pick, like the dentist cleans your teeth. A 1050 or a Swagger won't fix that problem as my Dillon swagger didn't it wasn't till It wouldn't take a primer I pulled it out of the press for inspection..

Beyond this I know nothing. I never saw any in pistol brass.

I have found the same in pistol brass. It's a bitch.

It's the main reason I pre-process my brass and leave the swager in the press even when running mostly 2F brass.

If I find one, it will be at the swaging station as the case is rudely stuffed up out of the shellplate, bending or tearing the rim.

Better to find it here than at the priming station where the new primer will be crushed trying to occupy the same space and the ring.

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CORRECTION

It's not Speer brass its FEDERAL CARTRIDGE and the primer is being punched out intact.

Casehead reads FC 96 with the NATO circled plus sign which indicates it was manufactured in 1996 making it 17 years old. The brass must have been stored quite well as it is not corroded and is in fact very bright. There appears to be only one extractor mark on the rim. This was sold as indoor range pickup brass.

Here are three examples in before and after pictures and the primers that were punched out. The primers shown below the cases in picture #2 are:

1) On it's side showing the cup is intact

2 ) The depriming pin has pushed the firing pin hit all the way back out

3) The anvil is still in the cup.

The downstroke on the 650 was noticeably harder to knock the primer out.

All three still show the "ringer" left in the case's primer pocket.

Are there any tools available that would remove this ring and allow this type of 9mm brass to be reloaded?

BC

post-27119-0-31209100-1370695267_thumb.j post-27119-0-42366900-1370695280_thumb.j post-27119-0-09536000-1370696786_thumb.j post-27119-0-10228900-1370696805_thumb.j

Edited by BillChunn
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Or, if you don't have too many, one of the little hand reamers from most of the reloading companies will do the job quite well. If you use that method, just remove the crimp, don't go far into the primer pocket.

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For the 9mm pistol brass, there's only about 20-30 but I have 1,000 pieces of 5.56 that has the NATO headstamp and military crimp. If it were just the pistol brass, then a Lyman primer pocket tool would do the job but with the rifle brass thrown in, the Dillon equipment looks like a better investment for the long haul.

Thanks for all the feedback. Much appreciated.

BC

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