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Running a shotgun wet?


AZGunut

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Hi everyone,

I have a somewhat silly question. I have both a FN SLP and VersaMax and have heard from multiple people that both of these guns like to b run wet. Now how wet is wet and where do you wet it? I always run a coating of light oil on most moving parts, but is that enough? What about the piston? Thanks in advance.

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I lube my SX2 with the same lube as everything else, 50/50 Mobil 1 racing oil and Mobil 1 Synthetic ATF. I lube the rails with 3 or 4 drops from a syringe in the receiver where the bolt rides and the exterior of the bolt and rack it until it there is excess that makes its way out of the receiver, either at the ejection port or getting the carrier/lifter wet. Then I wipe the carrier and outside of the receiver, then shoot it a ton. The syringe is handy because you can stick it in and lube the surfaces where the bolt reciprocates accurately.

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I run my shotguns the same as the AR. The bolt carrier gets slide slide on the parts where metal moves against metal, including the cup on the front of the action spring, and the bolt assembly gets the 50/50 mix of 30 wt RP and RP ATF. "Wet" on the outside (non-contact portions) of the bolt carrier does no good except to attract dirt and carbon.

On the SLP, I used a light coating of the 50/50 mix on the piston. On the VM, the external part of the pistons, slide slide. On the internal portions, a very small amount of dry lube. You don't want grease or oil in the piston chambers. The majority of VMs that have had cycle issues that I have torn apart had grease/oil in the piston chambers.

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Similar here. I use Milcom TW25 grease for the carrier guides and motorcycle synthetic oil for all of the metal to metal contact points and for the SLP piston. Versamax pistons stay dry. I run all of my guns wet in the key spots and dry where they should be dry to keep the dirt and carbon from building up. Specifically for the SLP... I noticed a pretty big difference in how long I could run the gun in a match without any hiccups when I switched from gun oil to synthetic motor oil on the piston. With gun oil, I could go about 80 or so light recoil shells before I had to switch to heavier stuff to keep it running. Motor oil is different from gun oil in that it is designed to hold up to much higher temps (such as the hot gasses in the SLP piston). After switching to synthetic motor oil on the SLP piston, I was able to go several hundred light recoil rounds. Clean up got much easier too as most of the carbon build up on the magazine tube wiped right off.

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