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Remember to turn the right way (360 degree sweep/DQ)


AndrewM
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Oh did I blow it BIG today. First stage, first position I fired my 6 rounds, began to retreat, extended my SH out to the right to turn left at the end of the "hallway"...and turned right sweeping my entire squads feet. :sick: I still feel sick to my stomach.

It clearly pained the SO to DQ me. I know I disappointed him at least as much as I disppointed my self.

My only excuse (and it is a worthless one at that) is that I usually shoot a revolver and tried to reload my auto like it was a revolver ("were the heck is the cylinder release!!") and, flustered, turned the wrong way. I will be back next match, with my revolver.

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Sorry to hear, but everyone is OK and it's a learning experience. I wouldn't let that dissuade you from shooting different divisions, but if you think it's a training issue, it may be worth doing some dry fire practice beforehand. In this case, reloading the gun had nothing to do with turning the wrong way. If you had a cylinder open while turning the wrong way, it still would have been a no-go. Shoot safe and good luck!

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It won't dissuade me too much. As far as reloading, I did say the excuse was worthless. I didn't really do any dryfire or live fire practice that was IDPA centered with the auto so I headed to my little semiprivate range where drawing from holsters and moving around is ok as long as you are safe and did some live fire practice similar to the stage I DQed on (and set up some other stages were 180 can be an issue) with both it and my revolvers. something I noticed is that I bring my gun to retention when I run (how you would do it in the "real world", I need to remember not to do that too.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Good to hear you are coming back and that you have the fortitude to learn, clear your thoughts and move on.

I sometimes wonder how many folks that are DQ'd never come back to our sport......

Shot my first match last Sun., DQ'd!!

When retreating, pointed muzzle up, as I turned I broke the 180.............Still bothered by it.

I do plan to return next match......but the thought did run thru my mind to not do so...

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My experience is that "first timers" tend to flirt with (or get in bed with) a DQ because they try to go as fast as the rest of us.

I usually try to have a quiet word with them along the lines of "try to get good hits and don't bother too much about the time at this stage". They usually get reasonable times too as they shoot smooth stages that way.

Those who hammer the throttle tend to mess up in the early days.. Offer consolation and don't let 'em get away :-)

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Good to hear you are coming back and that you have the fortitude to learn, clear your thoughts and move on.

I sometimes wonder how many folks that are DQ'd never come back to our sport......

Shot my first match last Sun., DQ'd!!

When retreating, pointed muzzle up, as I turned I broke the 180.............Still bothered by it.

I do plan to return next match......but the thought did run thru my mind to not do so...

See it quite a bit from newer shooters. Gun up as they move or gun pointed down towards their feet. They end up flirting with 180 dq's and sweeping dq's.

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  • 1 month later...

As long as you continue shooting, that will probably always stick in your mind. One of my first matches, I did a Michael Jackson spin in a squad of about 25. To this day, my blood pressure goes up when I got to a heels to mark, turn and draw stage. Glad nothing bad happened. DQ is part of the learning process. Seen some really good shooters get DQ's at Nationals so don't worry about it too much. Lesson learned and move on.

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My experience is that "first timers" tend to flirt with (or get in bed with) a DQ because they try to go as fast as the rest of us.

I usually try to have a quiet word with them along the lines of "try to get good hits and don't bother too much about the time at this stage". They usually get reasonable times too as they shoot smooth stages that way.

Those who hammer the throttle tend to mess up in the early days.. Offer consolation and don't let 'em get away :-)

Whenever I'm aware of a new or newish shooter on my squad (and I try hard to be made aware) I will take extra time to introduce myself and express this sentiment, and then will reiterate it before every stage start. "Here's some things to watch out for on this stage, and remember be calm, be smooth. No need to race through your first match, just be safe and have fun." So far at least most folks seem to greatly appreciate the extra bit of welcome to the sport.

-424D57

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