Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Small Rifle Primers for 9mm Minor Load - ?


40S&W
 Share

Recommended Posts

I use federal #205 small rifle primers for 9mm minor no problem.

121grain MG filled hollow points w/ 6.7gr HS-6. Out of a beretta 92 @ 10ft from the chrono I get about 1050 fps which translates to a PF of about 127. Cutting it close but it's a nice load and works well in the gun.

BTW I use Federal #205 small rifle primers in all my loading work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In most cases that I know of, small rifle primers have somewhat thicker cups than small pistol primers. The reason, of course, is that rifles have significantly heavier firing pin falls than a pistol, and you don't want a punctured primer which will allow "blowback" through the action, thus the thicker cup. Plus, rifles produce way more pressure than pistols and the primer must contain that, so the cup must be able to stand the pressure. In pistols with standard hammer or firing pin springs, most will still fire the small rifle primer, but some won't. Add to this that there is a difference in thickness and/or hardness of various primers depending on their brand. Federal's, on the one hand, are known for being a "softer" primer and somewhat more sensitive than others. Winchester and Remington are a bit harder, then CCI, some of the South American brands, and then the Russian stuff being probably the hardest. You will have to test the primers in your gun to determine if they will get a sufficient hit to set them off.

Now on to the other differences... Rifle primers are a bit "brighter" than pistol primers. That is, they have either a bit more, or a more volitile compound in them then pistol primers by design. This is because they have to light up considerably slower powders in a longer column than any pistol powders. This means that generally when you use small rifle primers instead of small pistol primers more of the powder will be exposed to the hotter flame from the primer and tend to light up faster than it would from a pistol primer. Loads should be reduced slightly to compensate for this when using medium and slow pistol powders since they will act a bit more like fast powders because more of it is immediately lit up by the rifle primer. Faster pistol powders (TiteGroup, Bullseye, Clays, et al) will light up almost immediately using almost any primer anyway, and are not as affected, but caution should still be exercised and loads reduced during developement until you know what effects are being produced by the change in primers. In other words, get out the chrono and test with the new primers and see. If you are currently using loads near the maximum for a particular powder with a pistol primer, then it is even more important to reduce those loads when changing to a rifle primer, even if it is a fast powder.

I hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used rifles and magnums with titegroup.

Federal magnums give me good consistency with minor loads. No misfires with glock standard striker springs.

Use proper safety measures in building up your load.

Don't use LARGE primers. Didn't switch the primer tube once :blush: Nothing went boom but I mangled some primers.

DNH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guy. Been using Federal Small Magum & Fioochi, Remington Small Rifle primers for 40 S&W major loads with TG.. No problems. I will give the SRP a try with minor 9mm & 40 S&W loads and see what happens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...