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Practiscore on Nook Simple Touch for Dummies


Graham Smith
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I've been going back over some of the old posts but the base post is up to 34 pages and there have to be a couple dozen others dealing with misc issues.

There's some good walk throughs for rooting the Nook but I can't find one simple straight forward explanation on how to install Practiscore on the Nooks that doesn't involve me knowing things that I don't know or having things that I don't have.

I can easily hook up the Nook to my PC via USB and transfer the file or put it on an SD card, but once I've done that, I don't have a clue as to how to actually install the software.

Can this actually be done without having to install other software that isn't going to have any understandable install instructions either?

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You have to root the device and there's no getting around that; the B&N Nook Simple Touch is marketed and sold as a dedicated e-reader, and was never intended for the things we're doing with it. The best process we've run across which gives the best results was developed by Chris Wren. It may look like a lot, but after the first or second one you do, it's actually fairly simple.

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=162107

NOOK Simple Touch (NST) Rooting For Practiscore - Wiki.pdf

The one thing you don't have to do in the procedure is enable the google Market app; you can skip that.

Edited by wgnoyes
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Graham...it might be a good idea to enable Google Market apps so you can download and install "AndExplorer". AndExplorer is a file manager like Windows Explorer allowing you to navigate around the Nook OS files when you are disconnected from the PC.

If you can connect the Nook to the PC via USB, and you can copy the Practiscore.apk file to the Nook, use AndExplorer on the Nook to navigate around the Nook OS files and when you find Practiscore.apk, just click on it and it installs. I usually copy Practiscore.apk to the "MyFiles" folder on the Nook (the one you see when the Nook drive attaches to your PC). Then when using AndExplorer on the Nook, when you open the file system, click the "go up" until you reach the root folder, then look down for the "media" folder..."My files" folder will be in there.

Probably the easiest way to install Practiscore. Note: If you have Practiscore already installed, it will overwrite with new version.

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It's not rooting that's the issue. There's plenty of instructions for doing that and I've had no problem with that. But I cannot find any instructions for actually installing Practiscore that don't involve other things. It's one of those cases where in order to one thing you have to do 5 others and they all require other things, etc.

My question remains, is it possible to install Practiscore on a rooted Nook with nothing more than a USB cable or an SD card?

Edited by Graham Smith
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It's not rooting that's the issue. There's plenty of instructions for doing that and I've had no problem with that. But I cannot find any instructions for actually installing Practiscore that don't involve other things. It's one of those cases where in order to one thing you have to do 5 others and they all require other things, etc.

My question remains, is it possible to install Practiscore on a rooted Nook with nothing more than a USB cable or an SD card?

Yes...but you need a Nook file manager to view the file system on the Nook...see my post above.

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Yes...but you need a Nook file manager to view the file system on the Nook...see my post above.

In other words, No. It cannot be done without installing other software which requires that you connect to the internet and yadda yadda.

Is that correct?

I'm not asking this to be stubborn or argumentative, etc. I am trying to determine what the bare minimum is to do all of this. I want to be able to give someone else a simple straight forward set of instructions that don't involve a whole bunch of extraneous stuff.

Edited by Graham Smith
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Ah, I understand now.

Part of Chris Wren's procedure is to install AndExplorer (which is included on the micro-sd card image) on the nook, for the ostensible reason of doing the initial install of Practiscore itself, which also comes on the micro-sd card image. The latter is a backleveled version, however.

Beyond that, you can simply copy newer versions of the .apk file for practiscore to the micro-sd card, insert that into the nook and use AndExplorer to install the latest version of Practiscore.

Another method which we use is to install dropbox on the nook and set it up to access a dropbox folder into which you can just place the new .apk file. Then on the nook you open up dropbox, navigate to that same folder and tap on the new .apk file to install the latest version. Note that you HAVE TO HAVE A MICRO-SD CARD IN THE SLOT ANYWAY in order for dropbox to work, which might beg the question of why do dropbox v. andexplorer. The thing is, micro-sd cards are cheap enough that you can just get a modest-sized one and insert and leave it in the nook. I prefer the dropbox method.

Either way, I don't have to jump through the capricious "it might work but it probably won't" hoops of getting the google market to run on the nook, which involves gmail and screwing around with youtube, the latter of which no one has EVER been able to explain to me why youtube would play any part in the google market.

But you have to have one or the other, AndExplorer (or some other file explorer) or dropbox. But to answer your question, no, you don't have to connect to the internet to rook a nook and install practiscore. You DO have to activate wifi on the nook to use it properly, however.

Edited by wgnoyes
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Fyi the Nook manager method of Rooting - which is the easiest way in my opinion - has a file explorer as part of the new interface. Save the practiscore.apk file (from the practiscore website) in a microsd card, put the card in the Nook and click practiscore to install. It doesn't get any easier on a Nook.

You can also buy an ipad and install through iTunes. Lots more money though.

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Yeah, but for any decent-sized match, you want the master to be an apple ios device, simply because that variety of practiscore can reach out over the wifi network and find all the nooks without you having to tap in device codes. The Android version for some reason still can't do that. You want to be able to just reach out and grab scores from the stages without interrupting the conduct of the stages themselves.

Edited by wgnoyes
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I have not tried any of the newer rooting methods, I'm still messing with a Nook that I rooted last year with TouchNooter (or whatever it was called). That didn't install any kind of explorer that I am aware of.

We have several new Nooks and I'm trying to write a set of clear and concise instructions for someone else that don't require prior knowledge or a bunch of extra software. I do have ADB and that's how I installed Practiscore last year but was trying to see if there were a simpler solution.

Now I see that there are at least three different "simplest ever" instructions for rooting and at least two different versions of the Nook OS in play. So what I have now is already "obsolete". My job is to sort through everything and put together a "how to" manual for the new Nooks. It's that or I'll just keep doing this all myself for now - which is beginning to look like the "simplest" solution of all.

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Everything is simpler than ADB. Anything that requires you to go into a terminal session on your computer and type in ip addresses is the kind of propeller head stuff that desperately needs to be avoided if we ever expect this system to take off.

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Everything is simpler than ADB. Anything that requires you to go into a terminal session on your computer and type in ip addresses is the kind of propeller head stuff that desperately needs to be avoided if we ever expect this system to take off.

The funny thing is, that for me, the opposite is true. I can throw together a batch file to semi-automate the process which is a lot easier than having to deal with setting up online accounts to download and install programs. I don't know Android from Andy Rooney and am not interested in learning yet another OS. I've already learned well over a dozen different languages and systems since I started using computers in 1972 and I just don't think there's room in my 63 year old brain for something else - I fear it will all just start leaking out of my ears. :surprise:

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Yeah, and I can key in an IBM IDCAMS (that's a utility for managing datasets/files) "define cluster" command that will absolutely cross your eyes, but the average club president or match director out there doesn't know ADB from ip addresses from IDCAMS or any of the other propeller head stuff that my office manager refers to as "baloney". This is the same reason linux will never really gain widespread popular acceptance, because every time you go out looking for help, 99 times out of 100 the first thing anyone tells you is "open up a terminal, now key in..." and you've lost them right then and there. You and I are of a similar technical background, and for months last year I never thought nooks would go anywhere because the rooting processes back then were idiotically long, technical, and they just didn't work as written. Chris Wren's was the first procedure that really did what it described, and even the first time through THAT, I screwed it up. We HAVE to stay away from the geeky "green screen" technical stuff as much as is humanly possible else this system on this platform will never take off.

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I have two units that I messed around with last year and I'm going to start them from scratch as well as the others. I looked at the "reboot 6x while singing Yankee Doodle" routine and was going to do that till I found one that said just start it up while holding down the bottom page keys. Decided to give that a try and it worked.

Any idea what the difference is?

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The TouchNooter Root that I use ... includes a factory reset module that I have used that eliminates the reboot 6x stuff.

That's find and dandy if you already have that installed. But if you don't... Method #3 here is the one that was commenting about: http://nookdevs.com/Nook_Simple_Touch_restore_to_stock Seems to be about as simple as simple gets.

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The NookManager Root that I use ... includes a factory reset module that I have used that eliminates the reboot 6x stuff.

That's find and dandy if you already have that installed. But if you don't... Method #3 here is the one that was commenting about: http://nookdevs.com/...store_to_stock Seems to be about as simple as simple gets.

except that doesn't restore the factory firmware which can be important depending on the reason you are factory resetting. You do no need to root with NookManager to factory reset with it. Just boot from the sd card, select "rescue" then select factory reset. Done. You do have to burn a sd card with NookManager however so if you don't want to do that then you are stuck with the other methods.

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I have two units that I messed around with last year and I'm going to start them from scratch as well as the others. I looked at the "reboot 6x while singing Yankee Doodle" routine and was going to do that...

Yes, the boot while holding down the down buttons doesn't really reset all that much. For a full factory reset, you have to do method #2..... except that it doesn't work as described. The following is the actual procedure I found to accomplish that depth of reset:

The #2 (heh-heh) hard reset procedure doesn't work as described. The actual sequence which I've done is this...:

You press and hold down the power button and you see the "read forever" static start-up screen. Count off 16-20 seconds. Then let go of the power button for a second and then press and hold again to start the next iteration.

On the 4th iteration, only then will you see the nook "progress bar". (It's possible that until you see this screen the first time, that he hasn't started counting off the six times yet.) It's not arrows by the way, rather it's dots, and it sticks on the 2nd dot from the left. On the 7th or 8th iteration, you'll stop seeing the scrolling dots screen again. On the 9th iteration, it'll auto start the firmware reset.

With the example I just did, it jumps into the firmware reset on the 9th go-round.

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Yes, the boot while holding down the down buttons doesn't really reset all that much. For a full factory reset, you have to do method #2..... except that it doesn't work as described. The following is the actual procedure I found to accomplish that depth of reset:

Thanks, I'm not sure what the Method #3 does but I tried it on a Nook that I rooted last year and it took it right back to the firmware it came with.

This is precisely the sort of thing that drives me crazy - conflicting instructions on how to do the same thing. I see this in Windows all the time and invariably it turns out that there are instructions that work under some specific circumstance or with one version but not another or have some mistake in them or any of a hundred other things. <sigh>

In this case, I've read enough different versions of #2 that I think that there is no magic number at all. It's simply that you have to execute the actions is a strict series without any proper visual cues to tell you when to do the next thing. Only by repeating the same thing several times will you manage to get it right by happenstance. I found one post where someone said that it took them 20 times to get it to work.

The question is, does method #2 do anything that method #3 doesn't or vice versa. I'm not convinced anyone actually knows since almost everything is based on experimentation. As an example, this guy claims that #3 does more than #2:

http://www.keyourcar...touch-recovery/

On the internet, everyone can be an expert because you're not allowed to lie on the internet. I read that somewhere.

Edited by Graham Smith
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Yes, #2 when it finally takes hold shows you a screen where he says he's doing a by-god firmware restore back to factory settings. That runs a couple of minutes, and then you reboot into the initial out-of-the-box setup. Note that you have to re-register the nook with the SAME email address you used to register before, else he'll reject it and you can't proceed. That's why I created a separate dedicated gmail address just for these things, both to register the nook with B&N and for dropbox access. I tried #3 once, and when I rebooted, the device was still rooted, but the rooted code was now broken.

Edited by wgnoyes
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And #3 worked for me just fine. Go figure. Both methods seem to involve some kind of trick that interrupts the boot and changes what it does. If that is the case, then it may depend on just where it got in the boot before being interrupted.

BTW, I think found a way to install Practiscore from USB using the browser without the need for an explorer.

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Well the one notable thing the nook manager rooting system gives you is that the end-result user interface is a built-in file manager, so all you have to do is insert a microsd card containing the latest practiscore .apk file and then tap on it when it appears on the screen, as the file manager seems to be defaulted to looking at the sdcard.

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