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matching 9mm factory loads


robmont
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I haven't been able to find exactly what I'm looking for. I'd like to start my reloading career by duplicating as closely as I can the Federal Champion 9mm Luger 115 gr FMJ RN. Box says 1125 fps muzzel velosity. Was able to locate some Hogdon Tightgroup and Universal powder. Hogdon has a great website where you can plug in all of the components to come up with a recipe. Except that it doesn't allow for bullet type and everyone here says that's important. Most of what they list for 115 gr bullets is either LRN or hollow points. So I need some advice please. I have CCI 500 primers and Speer 115 gr TMJ's and Precision Delta 115 gr FMJ's. The cases are various brands, commercial, once fired and polished. But I can't imagine that that matters much as long as they are in good shape and resized properly.

Thanks in advance.

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Start low and work your way up, just like eliminator said. I'm not familiar with Universal but I do have experience with Titegroup. I would start out with 4.1 grains and then work your way up. 4.1 grains won't get you 1,125 fps, but it's safer to start low. Chrono 4.1, see what you get, and see if it cycles the gun. Then try 4.3. I doubt if you'll need to go over 4.4 or 4.5, but I'm not shooting your gun, and loading your rounds, so I could be wrong. Every gun is different.

I would start with loading some dummy rounds without primers, and powder to establish an overall length, and then check them against your chamber and magazines to make sure they fit and cycle properly. It's better to start long, and then go shorter when establishing an OAL. Make sure the bullet is not sticking in the chamber. Push the round down with your thumb to make sure. The round should not stick, and it should fall out of the chamber freely.

If you're happy with an average for the overall length, then using mixed brass is fine. If you want a more consistent OAL, and load that is more consistent on the chrono, then use the same brass, as Steve RA mentioned. Most folks don't worry about it, but if you have the time and patience then I would stick with one brand of brass.

I hope all the info helps. Chris

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Do you know what powder they're using? I'm assuming it's a "custom" mixture.

Measure the OAL of the factory rounds, make yours the same. Pull the bullet and weigh the powder. If you know what the powder is, make it the exact same and chrono. If you don't, work up a load using the same OAL until you get the desired velocity. Also measure the crimp, should be .376-.378

Edited by polizei1
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You will have better success in whatever you are trying to do if you'll sort brass and only use one brand in a particular load. Case wall thickness varies, interior capacity varies so it helps to lose one variable.

+1 Brass makes a bigger difference than most people realize. :cheers:

As far as making the overall length the same as factory, eventhough that will work to ensure they still fit in the magazines, but, the ogives of the bullets may not be the same, and the ammo may not chamber. When working up a load with bullets you haven't used before, you NEED to do the "plunk" test, with YOUR barrel, to make sure they will fit. If in doubt, a little shorter is better, because bullets/dies don't always come out to exact OAL everytime. :surprise:

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Manufacturers use proprietary blends. You'll never get a match. Shooting the same weight bullet at the same velocity will be the best you can do. Don't use factory COAL as your bullet profile won't match factory bullet profile.

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Manufacturers use proprietary blends. You'll never get a match. Shooting the same weight bullet at the same velocity will be the best you can do. Don't use factory COAL as your bullet profile won't match factory bullet profile.

Well...if you pull the factory bullet, and measure it...if the bullets he's using is very close, it shouldn't be that different. That is, assuming the OP is using the same type of bullet (JHP, FMJ, etc.).

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Thanks to all for the suggestions. This is all much more complicated than what I thought it would be. I'm really just a casual shooter. I think that I'll just stick to factory loads. One more bit of advise though please. I have all of the supplies and equipment to start reloading and it's all brand new. What's the best way to dispose of it to recoup most of my investment? Gunbroker probably for most of it? What about primers and gunpowder? Is it legal to sell that to someone else? I'm sure it can't be shipped though.

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Thanks to all for the suggestions. This is all much more complicated than what I thought it would be. I'm really just a casual shooter. I think that I'll just stick to factory loads. One more bit of advise though please. I have all of the supplies and equipment to start reloading and it's all brand new. What's the best way to dispose of it to recoup most of my investment? Gunbroker probably for most of it? What about primers and gunpowder? Is it legal to sell that to someone else? I'm sure it can't be shipped though.

Just starting out I realize everything is just as clear as mud. You might consider setting everything aside and spend a few weeks or months reading and researching all things reloading. As I recall, the local Cabela's has "Intro to Reloading Classes", maybe you can find similiar or talk to people where you shoot, you will find reloaders and they'll help if you ask questions. I bet it won't look so muddy then.

http://ultimatereloader.com/

P.S. I think many people will tell you that you might want to wait until you've got some experience before using Titegroup.

Edited by aviatrix
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Yep, check out Gavin's video's, there's a TON of information. It certainly can seem overwhelming at first, but it's actually really easy...

Don't worry about matching factory rounds and trying to produce the perfect round right off the bat, it isn't going to happen. Find load data from either a book, on here, or on the powder manufactures website. Start low, and work your way up. I don't use TG or Universal, so I can't help you out, but others will be able to.

You're overly complicating things though...

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Honestly, you won't be able to exactly duplicate factory powder charges because the factories don't always use the same powder with each ammunition lot. There are two types of powder, canister grade, and non-cannister. Cannister grade is what is sold to the public (us). This powder is as consistent as they can make it, so the consumers don't have to start over every time they buy powder, although it's not a bad idea. When we buy powder, unless the newly purchased powder comes from the same factory "lot", there will be some sort of minor difference. This is why you see a lot of competitiors buy large quantities of powder at the same time. This way they only have to do their load development once. At least until they get through that initial supply of powder. Usually the velocity varies a little bit. No big deal in most cases.

Non-cannister powders don't even have factory loading data, and we cannot even buy them. The ammo manufacturers test the powders and develop their own loading data for that exact loy of powder, then they do their best to use it all up in one huge production run because they'll have to do their load development all over again if they change even one component. This takes time, and time is money. We, the public cannot just pull a bullet and look at the powders to identify it because we don't have the necessary information to correctly identify it, and it's a unique powder lot anyway.

I suggest you just select a starting load that suits you, and work your way up from there if necessary. You may end up liking your first load, and want to stick with it. I realize reloading looks pretty complicated, but once you get your load selection down, it gets much easier every time you do it. Either powder you have will get you the velocities you seek, The Titegroup starting load is already faster than your goal of 1125 FPS, which I'm assuming is from the factory ammo spec, and not the velocities chronographed from your pistol.

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Also, now that you have the equipment, and components (hopefully in the near future) you will realize a considerable savings in loading you own. It really isn't as bad as we may have made it seem in the above posts. Also, remember we were all in the same boat - experience wise - as you are right now!!!

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Thanks to all for the suggestions. This is all much more complicated than what I thought it would be. I'm really just a casual shooter. I think that I'll just stick to factory loads. One more bit of advise though please. I have all of the supplies and equipment to start reloading and it's all brand new. What's the best way to dispose of it to recoup most of my investment? Gunbroker probably for most of it? What about primers and gunpowder? Is it legal to sell that to someone else? I'm sure it can't be shipped though.

Reloading is not complicated, but you do need to be anal. I have been acquiring reloading equipment on trades and have refused to sell a press to someone because they had no comprehension of what they were getting into.

As far as your equipment try Ebay, Gunbroker, CraigsList or Armslist.

Your other components try selling locally on Craigslist, you can ship them but it gets expensive.

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Don't give up before you've even started. Part of the pleasure of reloading is making rounds better than factory for less money. You won't make perfect ammo first time out. It's a test and tune process. Build a round with components you've bought and go try it.

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you want to learn to shoot and follow the sights and you need ammo to run the gun and make noise

and put holes in paper?

k, ammo....

If you read the load data for your powder and ALL the bullets of the same weight,

you will find the weights of the powder are all similar. Pick a bullet of similar shape and

construction, use the starting charge and make your practice ammo.

This will get you a starting point.

make sure you get that powder in the case and only one time. Dump out any questions.

did I? anything .... dump.

there is a lot to learn in reloading. Mistakes can be painful.

so the advice you get will be on the side of having you avoid the bigger problems.

Reloading requires that you think about what you are doing. at all times.

daydreaming is dangerous in reloading.... etc.

miranda

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