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Handloading Question


Chriznak
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Build the bench so it does not move at all when you sit or jump on it. THEN reinforce it some more! :goof: The handle exerts a lot of leverage and will still cause some movement. My bench is mounted with lag bolts on all three walls with 4X4 legs in the center to support the weight and pressure. My casefeeder still shook so bad that I had to bolt it directly to the bench to keep cases from flipping upside down.

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Just solid. 4" think solid. It's 4" because it's 6' long w/o a center support & 20" deep. Works great. In stead of a reloading room like most of my friends I have reloading closet, so I got a 4" thick solid peice of hickory. Good to go. Hope this helps.

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Just solid. 4" think solid. It's 4" because it's 6' long w/o a center support & 20" deep. Works great. In stead of a reloading room like most of my friends I have reloading closet, so I got a 4" thick solid peice of hickory. Good to go. Hope this helps.

Is there a specific attribute of hickory that makes it good for a reloading bench? Just wondering in case I can't find 4" thick hickory sheets and my local hardware stores.

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I have a bench that is made from a hollow core door, that most people would use as firewood!!!!! It has served me well for many years even though it is not ideal. That being said, I agree that your bench should be as sturdy and stable as possible. Invest and build once!

Richard

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Friend of mine wanted me to build him a reloading bench. We were working our way through his wants & ideas when he said he wanted it on wheels but he didn't want it to shake or move at all. I had to stop him right there. I didn't feel there was anyway I could build a portable reloading bench narrow enough to fit through most doors that would be absolutely solid. I suggested to him that he find a solid metal bench/cabinet of some kind because I couldn't supply what he needed. Now this may not sound like a big deal but I'm not afraid to do any woodworking project at all. If it can be built of wood, I can do it. I didn't feel I could achieve the required goal in this case though.

I guess I said all that to say this: if you want it solid, you have to plan for it to be solid. No Home Depot cardboard boxed cabinet sitting in the middle of your garage is gonna be all that solid, at least not for very long.

MLM

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Mine is 3/4" ply with 3/4" mdf glued to that with a top coat of 3/4" tongue / groove bamboo flooring 6" plank glued to that. This sits above hickory cabinets bolted to the wall. Sounds like overkill but with a 650 mounted on a strong mount with case feeder things want to move.. Laminated materials stop that!!! Cost for a 30" x 5' bench top was less than $80.00. Lowes hickory cabinet bottoms on sale were just useful bling!!! Yes, sturdy is good!!!

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Mine is 3/4" ply with 3/4" mdf glued to that with a top coat of 3/4" tongue / groove bamboo flooring 6" plank glued to that. This sits above hickory cabinets bolted to the wall. Sounds like overkill but with a 650 mounted on a strong mount with case feeder things want to move.. Laminated materials stop that!!! Cost for a 30" x 5' bench top was less than $80.00. Lowes hickory cabinet bottoms on sale were just useful bling!!! Yes, sturdy is good!!!

How much do you estimate it weighs? How much weight do you think would be good enough?

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Common themes in the above:

A stiff mounting surface that doesn't flex. Heavy and/or bolted to the wall to prevent movement.

Mine is 2 sheets of 3/4" ply glued together with a doorskin surface on top, 2x4 legs/bracing, bolted into the wall. Ugly as sin, but it's solid and doesn't move.

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I am using an old kitchen counter and cabinets for my reloading bench, but I don't have the press mounted to the bench. Instead I had a local fab shop take 2 pieces of 3/8" plate, approximately 12" square and weld them to the top and bottom of a piece of 4" square tubing. I lagged the bottom plate to the floor, and mounted the press on top. Total cost was less than $50. I took the idea from a similar set up at a local machine shop where they had a grinder mounted on top. This set up is rock solid. A few years later I found someone offering a set up very similar to mine over the internet http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFZ2XeZSbms.

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Just get a 3/4" sheet of plywood. Good stuff, not that press board. 2 - 8' 4x4's and ask them to cut them in half for you if you don't have the saw to do it with. Get a couple of 2x4's and hammer those to the outside edge of the plywood. Put the 4x4's that you cut at the corners for legs. Screw all the parts to each other again. Done. Heavy, sturdy, won't wobble around and you can stand on it table for reloading. Adjust measurements or cuts as you see fit.

any good building plans out there for making your own reloading bench from scratch?

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Just get a 3/4" sheet of plywood. Good stuff, not that press board. 2 - 8' 4x4's and ask them to cut them in half for you if you don't have the saw to do it with. Get a couple of 2x4's and hammer those to the outside edge of the plywood. Put the 4x4's that you cut at the corners for legs. Screw all the parts to each other again. Done. Heavy, sturdy, won't wobble around and you can stand on it table for reloading. Adjust measurements or cuts as you see fit.

any good building plans out there for making your own reloading bench from scratch?

Thanks a lot for your help. Mind if I ask what type of screws to get and what drill I would need?

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Just get a 3/4" sheet of plywood. Good stuff, not that press board. 2 - 8' 4x4's and ask them to cut them in half for you if you don't have the saw to do it with. Get a couple of 2x4's and hammer those to the outside edge of the plywood. Put the 4x4's that you cut at the corners for legs. Screw all the parts to each other again. Done. Heavy, sturdy, won't wobble around and you can stand on it table for reloading. Adjust measurements or cuts as you see fit.

any good building plans out there for making your own reloading bench from scratch?

Thanks a lot for your help. Mind if I ask what type of screws to get and what drill I would need?

My bench is ALL oak. Being as my top is 2" thick I used 1/4" x 5 lag bolts to hold the 2x4's to the top. My legs are 2 2x4's bolted together in an L shape. I then used 5/16" x 3-1/2" bolts run into T-nuts to secure the legs to the bench top. If I ever notice an flex at all in the bench it is just a matter of minutes to snug all of the bolts back up. After 4 years it is still as solid as when I first built it, and I have not had to snug the bolts yet.

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