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Zen moment i think!


djthemac
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I have been shooting USPSA/IDPA seriously [for me anyway 2-3 club matches per month] for about a year now. I prefer the speed of USPSA and shoot limited major which allows me to run and gun as quickly as my legs will move. Over the past few matches I noticed I had been making errors with regards to sight picture and trying to push myself too fast, inevitably gaining delta mikes on the way. Then my limited gun broke. I borrowed my dad's stock Glock 17 and started shooting production and SSP with it. I learned quickly that accuracy while shooting minor is PARAMOUNT to doing well in these classes.

Fast forward to last saturday, I entered a local IDPA match with my dad's glock. I had not cleaned the gun prior to entering the match as I traditionally do, and had developed a load for it about 3 days before. I had not had the opportunity to put this gun through its paces, and was unsure of how it would react under recoil. The sites were standard glock night sights, no fancy serrations or fiber optics. When I LAMR'd for the first stage, I felt extremely calm and unhurried. I rehearsed in my mind my plan which included a tactical reload that none of the other shooters had done. When the buzzer sounded I very carefully completed my planned movements, and was able to see the sights lift and settle for each shot. I could not tell you shortly after shooting the stage exactly where my rounds had impacted on the target but I felt that at the time that I broke the shot, I was very comfortable and confident shooting, and everything felt "right." At least enough to transition to the next shot/target without waiting to see the holes. The whole match felt like I was shooting it in slow motion, yet I ended up winning my first match by a margin of 10% with only 6 points down.

I think my mind gets too worked up with the complications of USPSA, and the change of gun and concentration demands with IDPA was a nice change of speed.

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I have been shooting USPSA/IDPA seriously [for me anyway 2-3 club matches per month] for about a year now. I prefer the speed of USPSA and shoot limited major which allows me to run and gun as quickly as my legs will move. Over the past few matches I noticed I had been making errors with regards to sight picture and trying to push myself too fast, inevitably gaining delta mikes on the way. Then my limited gun broke. I borrowed my dad's stock Glock 17 and started shooting production and SSP with it. I learned quickly that accuracy while shooting minor is PARAMOUNT to doing well in these classes.

Fast forward to last saturday, I entered a local IDPA match with my dad's glock. I had not cleaned the gun prior to entering the match as I traditionally do, and had developed a load for it about 3 days before. I had not had the opportunity to put this gun through its paces, and was unsure of how it would react under recoil. The sites were standard glock night sights, no fancy serrations or fiber optics. When I LAMR'd for the first stage, I felt extremely calm and unhurried. I rehearsed in my mind my plan which included a tactical reload that none of the other shooters had done. When the buzzer sounded I very carefully completed my planned movements, and was able to see the sights lift and settle for each shot. I could not tell you shortly after shooting the stage exactly where my rounds had impacted on the target but I felt that at the time that I broke the shot, I was very comfortable and confident shooting, and everything felt "right." At least enough to transition to the next shot/target without waiting to see the holes. The whole match felt like I was shooting it in slow motion, yet I ended up winning my first match by a margin of 10% with only 6 points down.

I think my mind gets too worked up with the complications of USPSA, and the change of gun and concentration demands with IDPA was a nice change of speed.

Accuracy is always paramount.

Stages shouldn't be a blur dude. You should remember exactly what happened after every shot fired.

I'm glad that you are shooting mikes. That means you are trying.

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I have been shooting USPSA/IDPA seriously [for me anyway 2-3 club matches per month] for about a year now. I prefer the speed of USPSA and shoot limited major which allows me to run and gun as quickly as my legs will move. Over the past few matches I noticed I had been making errors with regards to sight picture and trying to push myself too fast, inevitably gaining delta mikes on the way. Then my limited gun broke. I borrowed my dad's stock Glock 17 and started shooting production and SSP with it. I learned quickly that accuracy while shooting minor is PARAMOUNT to doing well in these classes.

Fast forward to last saturday, I entered a local IDPA match with my dad's glock. I had not cleaned the gun prior to entering the match as I traditionally do, and had developed a load for it about 3 days before. I had not had the opportunity to put this gun through its paces, and was unsure of how it would react under recoil. The sites were standard glock night sights, no fancy serrations or fiber optics. When I LAMR'd for the first stage, I felt extremely calm and unhurried. I rehearsed in my mind my plan which included a tactical reload that none of the other shooters had done. When the buzzer sounded I very carefully completed my planned movements, and was able to see the sights lift and settle for each shot. I could not tell you shortly after shooting the stage exactly where my rounds had impacted on the target but I felt that at the time that I broke the shot, I was very comfortable and confident shooting, and everything felt "right." At least enough to transition to the next shot/target without waiting to see the holes. The whole match felt like I was shooting it in slow motion, yet I ended up winning my first match by a margin of 10% with only 6 points down.

I think my mind gets too worked up with the complications of USPSA, and the change of gun and concentration demands with IDPA was a nice change of speed.

Now just make that a way of life!

And :cheers: to that great story. The likes of which I never tire of hearing.

be

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I have been shooting USPSA/IDPA seriously [for me anyway 2-3 club matches per month] for about a year now. I prefer the speed of USPSA and shoot limited major which allows me to run and gun as quickly as my legs will move. Over the past few matches I noticed I had been making errors with regards to sight picture and trying to push myself too fast, inevitably gaining delta mikes on the way. Then my limited gun broke. I borrowed my dad's stock Glock 17 and started shooting production and SSP with it. I learned quickly that accuracy while shooting minor is PARAMOUNT to doing well in these classes.

Fast forward to last saturday, I entered a local IDPA match with my dad's glock. I had not cleaned the gun prior to entering the match as I traditionally do, and had developed a load for it about 3 days before. I had not had the opportunity to put this gun through its paces, and was unsure of how it would react under recoil. The sites were standard glock night sights, no fancy serrations or fiber optics. When I LAMR'd for the first stage, I felt extremely calm and unhurried. I rehearsed in my mind my plan which included a tactical reload that none of the other shooters had done. When the buzzer sounded I very carefully completed my planned movements, and was able to see the sights lift and settle for each shot. I could not tell you shortly after shooting the stage exactly where my rounds had impacted on the target but I felt that at the time that I broke the shot, I was very comfortable and confident shooting, and everything felt "right." At least enough to transition to the next shot/target without waiting to see the holes. The whole match felt like I was shooting it in slow motion, yet I ended up winning my first match by a margin of 10% with only 6 points down.

I think my mind gets too worked up with the complications of USPSA, and the change of gun and concentration demands with IDPA was a nice change of speed.

Now just make that a way of life!

And :cheers: to that great story. The likes of which I never tire of hearing.

be

Thanks! will be working on it! :D

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