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A book that takes the "dry" out of dry-fire.


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Ben Stoeger's Championship Shooting Dry-Fire book has actually made it fun to dry-fire this winter. My reloads and transitions improved in the first week! It offers drills that help with the skills everyone needs to work on, and the fun part is the recommended par times for beginner, intermediate and expert. It lets you know where you stand, and gives you something to work toward. There are tips for shaving time off my runs that I did not even know I was wasting! Check out my reload:

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I need to practice not pressing my hand down on the gun before I draw, and bringing my nondominant hand farther to the right to meet the gun on the draw. I also need to pull the trigger prior to moving out of that position and on to the next. I had the sight picture, but did not immediately pull the trigger. Wow, home videos on camera phones are really helpful! Looks have nothing to do with it ;)

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Maybe keep the gun a little higher during the reload. Don't drop the gun hand, bring the mag to the gun. That way the target never leaves your line of sight.

Yes, thank you!

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Since a GM gives you advice, and you have his book, and you are... close... it seems like the direct advice he has to offer is far better than anything I can offer from the forum and a video... but here goes from what I see (and note, my perspective is a C limited and B open shooter, for what that's worth...). All in all, it looked very good and anything I could say would just be tweaking and tuning critiques based upon what I could find from pause / play of the video looking for constructive feedback... so, take all coments as positive please... here goes:

- Hard to tell if that's your 'aggressive', weak side foot forward, shooting stance or not in the vid. If not, consider dry fire practice in your aggressive shooting stance. No reason to step into your stance after you draw.

- perhaps react to the 'beginning' of the buzzer beep, don't delay to wait to the end of the buzzer, could be video / my PC, but seemed like there was a delay to react

- Snap to the gun - seems like your strong arm / hands could move faster to the gun, again, could be my PC / video player

- Weak hand seemed to float around abdomen when I paused / played, perhaps experiement with bringing closer to where it's goiing meet strong hand and index on abdomen for consistent placement of weak hand on draw instead of floating

- Weak hand also seemed slightly clenched or partially closed at time strong hand was drawing, meaning another action had to be made to open weak hand to perform mating / grip / indexing weak hand to gun. I like to index weak hand pointer finger first knuckle right under the trigger guard, so keep weak hand flat and open on abdomen and use that top of first knuckle on weak hand to index to bottom of trigger guard as gun comes out, no opening weak hand, no added movements from weak hand... your mileage may vary.

- Could be angle, but your strong side shoulder seemed higher than your weak side shoulder during draw, but you seem to correct that adjustment as you push firearm out, a small loss of time in adjustment could be saved if this is really occuring, and if it could be fixed in draw... perhaps video striaght on in a mirror from behind and see if it's just bad angle in this video.

- Eyes snapped to magwell good during reload and it looked like you had good visibility of the mag going into the well and the cant of the firearm seemed comfortable as you reloaded... hard to say if you need the firearm higher or not from the angle in the vid. I would actually say that looked pretty smooth, controlled and comfortable. I don't think I would suggest you change the height of hold on the firearm from what I seen there.

Good stuff, see you on the range,

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Since a GM gives you advice, and you have his book, and you are... close... it seems like the direct advice he has to offer is far better than anything I can offer from the forum and a video... but here goes from what I see (and note, my perspective is a C limited and B open shooter, for what that's worth...). All in all, it looked very good and anything I could say would just be tweaking and tuning critiques based upon what I could find from pause / play of the video looking for constructive feedback... so, take all coments as positive please... here goes:

I can't shoot when that particular GM is watching. Makes it difficult to get advice from him, but I did take one of his classes, which is where I learned most of what I do know. Thanks for taking a look!

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Kita - I'm currently reading Ben's latest book, Practical Pistol and find it to be an excellent read, too... Good, specific information on several areas that are very helpful... He covers the core fundamentals of shooting in easily understood detail... (I'm at about the halfway point) I would recommend it to you, but I have the strangest hunch that you have already read it... ;)

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Kita - I'm currently reading Ben's latest book, Practical Pistol and find it to be an excellent read, too... Good, specific information on several areas that are very helpful... He covers the core fundamentals of shooting in easily understood detail... (I'm at about the halfway point) I would recommend it to you, but I have the strangest hunch that you have already read it... ;)

Actually, as I was reading the drafts, he was continually adding a significant amount of content to the areas I had already consumed. Now that it is complete, I need to go back and read what I missed! What have you found most helpful so far?

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He has some good tips for shooting single handed - I have trouble shooting weak handed... and a good tip for shooting around walls - even though I am tall, I have difficulty shooting targets behind the left side of a wall (I'm right handed)... Good fundamentals overview - detailed explanation on the grip... and I still have a good bit to go...

Of course the overview on the rear cover is the best part... ;)

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He has some good tips for shooting single handed - I have trouble shooting weak handed... and a good tip for shooting around walls - even though I am tall, I have difficulty shooting targets behind the left side of a wall (I'm right handed)... Good fundamentals overview - detailed explanation on the grip... and I still have a good bit to go...

Of course the overview on the rear cover is the best part... ;)

I posted a video about it under Ben's vendor page on this site if you'd like to check it out.
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Don't mean to hijack this thread but this looked like the best way to get a quick answer ...

So I just picked up this book (I already have his first and am training with it) and my question relates to how often is optimum for repeating an individual drill set? There are 44 drill sets in the book and I can do 2 per dry fire session without losing focus. If I dry fire 5x/week I would only end up repeating a drill set once a month.

Now Given my current skill level I don't need to do every drill set but most will still be helpful so the question is -- how many drill sets should I pick to focus on so that I repeat each drill set on some regular basis, and what should that be?

Ex, should I just pick 10 drill sets so that at 5 sessions per week I'd be repeating everything weekly?

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and now under the correct user name…. :D

I read all three of Ben’s books over a two day road trip and found them very valuable. I like to see a book written from the perspective of a production shooter and he has an ability to break things down very simply where others tend to be long winded. I really like what he has to say about grip,recoil control and the importance (or not importance) of seeing the sights track the same way every single time. Also like what he has to say about the “seeing what you need to see and ONLY seeing what you need to see “ and the pitfall this can lead to in practice. Why not see more if you are able?

To Nimitz question. I would say just pick drills that address what you assess to be areas you need the most improvement on. Work them until you plateau and then move to the next. If you have a one second draw already you probably don’t need to spend all you time doing draws. It would seem that you could focus elsewhere and all the draws incorporated in other drills would be enough for maintenance of the skill.

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