Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

I've had a massive breakthrough over the last couple weeks.


DonovanM
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here is what I am definitely not doing. I am not trying hard, I am not rushing nor am I pushing for "speed" almost at all. In fact I have very specifically stopped doing the whole rushing and trying thing almost altogether.

I am pushing for hits and efficient, consistent stage execution. I am only going as fast as I can call shots (usually, with a few exceptions) and have shot 95 and 96% points percentages my last two matches - which I am absolutely thrilled with. My goal is to not drop below 94% this whole year, no matter what match I'm at.

I am fully expecting more out of myself and am coming closer to meeting my mental image of the ideal, perfect stage execution in my head. That's what I'm competing with. I am not concerned with whether I'm winning by 10% or losing by 10%. Not important, that's for after the match. Execution is what's important.

I still haven't done any significant amount of live fire practice to speak of. Well short of 2,000 rounds outside of club matches in my entire shooting career. This is only a handicap, so I would not recommend it - I'm in school and broke. On the other hand, I did break the magwell on my SIRT pistol a while ago and am getting plenty of use out of it.

I've gone back to the basics (fundamentals). Shooting alphas and knowing that I'm shooting alphas. Try it out, you might be surprised.

Also, it's amazing what kind of lag I've experienced in terms of skill development. I haven't been practicing all that much lately in the last few months, at least compared to what I did prior to that. So the skills have always been there apparently, but not the mental game that allowed me to unlock it all... interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 91
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I think that's exactly it. You practice to get the fundamentals down, once you know them, thinking about anything other than execution takes away from your performance. All the distracting details can be thought of later during a performance review.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is something I need to work on. Since I shoot IDPA I need to remember that accuracy is more important than speed. Then again, it doesn't help when I go slow and still hit -1 or -3

Not just IDPA... f I don't have an Alpha:Charlie ratio, with no deltas or mikes, of 8 or 9:1 I am not happy.

Hey Donovan,

Sounds great appreciate the thoughts...what is your class and your level?

I shoot Production and am ranked as a Master.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I am not concerned with whether I'm winning by 10% or losing by 10%. Not important, that's for after the match. Execution is what's important."

I am convinced that this is the best mindset for 99% of us.

It has always been in this mode when I have shot my best.

And when others talk about shooting their best, it's usually very similar to what you describe...

Attaboy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I am not concerned with whether I'm winning by 10% or losing by 10%. Not important, that's for after the match. Execution is what's important."

I am convinced that this is the best mindset for 99% of us.

It has always been in this mode when I have shot my best.

And when others talk about shooting their best, it's usually very similar to what you describe...

Attaboy!

:D

This is something I need to work on. Since I shoot IDPA I need to remember that accuracy is more important than speed. Then again, it doesn't help when I go slow and still hit -1 or -3

Don't go slow. Be patient.

You've gotta learn how to take your time in a hurry. Set aside just enough time to get good hits on target.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is something I need to work on. Since I shoot IDPA I need to remember that accuracy is more important than speed. Then again, it doesn't help when I go slow and still hit -1 or -3

Don't go slow. Be patient.

Yes. Be visually patient. Wait to see what you know you need to see to confirm that each shot hit the target. That was HUGE for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you for the insights provided in this thread. I applied these principles to my own shooting and mental management programme over the weekend and it defnitely helped me to place 1st Overall in my division at our National Championships.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the insights provided in this thread. I applied these principles to my own shooting and mental management programme over the weekend and it defnitely helped me to place 1st Overall in my division at our National Championships.

That's what I'm talkin about! Nice work!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

This is exactly what I started to see once I decided to focus hard on my revo game. It's not solely or more applicable to revo, but when I work on executing what I want to execute as opposed to burning as hot as possible (as I practice on standards) it shows a lot more. My splits and transitions are what they are, but as far as the gun goes, I let things happen and try to keep up instead of trying to force them, if that makes sense. I find an excellent return in focusing on moving where and how I want to move while calmly executing a reload, for example, rather than going "oh crap reload now."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is exactly what I started to see once I decided to focus hard on my revo game. It's not solely or more applicable to revo, but when I work on executing what I want to execute as opposed to burning as hot as possible (as I practice on standards) it shows a lot more. My splits and transitions are what they are, but as far as the gun goes, I let things happen and try to keep up instead of trying to force them, if that makes sense. I find an excellent return in focusing on moving where and how I want to move while calmly executing a reload, for example, rather than going "oh crap reload now."

Revo?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is exactly what I started to see once I decided to focus hard on my revo game. It's not solely or more applicable to revo, but when I work on executing what I want to execute as opposed to burning as hot as possible (as I practice on standards) it shows a lot more. My splits and transitions are what they are, but as far as the gun goes, I let things happen and try to keep up instead of trying to force them, if that makes sense. I find an excellent return in focusing on moving where and how I want to move while calmly executing a reload, for example, rather than going "oh crap reload now."

Revo?

I assume Revolver.

This is exactly what I started to see once I decided to focus hard on my revo game. It's not solely or more applicable to revo, but when I work on executing what I want to execute as opposed to burning as hot as possible (as I practice on standards) it shows a lot more. My splits and transitions are what they are, but as far as the gun goes, I let things happen and try to keep up instead of trying to force them, if that makes sense. I find an excellent return in focusing on moving where and how I want to move while calmly executing a reload, for example, rather than going "oh crap reload now."

Good stuff!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...