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Crimping Bayou Bullets


Hammbone
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Thus far, I've only loaded plated bullets. However, I'm very intrigued by all this talk about Bayou Bullets. I'm temped to drink the kool-aid and try it. But here's the noob question - how do you crimp them? What's the deal with the cannelure looking groves? Is a person limited to OAL's with these? Would it be sufficient to leave my dies set up for the light crimp I use on plated bullets? Do they require special treatment?

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You won't be dissapointed with the kool-aid. I use a taper crimp on everything except my heavy magnum loads. Your OAL would depend upon your barrel and mags. I would like to think that the plated crimp would be good enough for the Bayou bullets also.

If you are not sure then order a sample pack from Bayou.

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Thus far, I've only loaded plated bullets. However, I'm very intrigued by all this talk about Bayou Bullets. I'm temped to drink the kool-aid and try it. But here's the noob question - how do you crimp them? What's the deal with the cannelure looking groves? Is a person limited to OAL's with these? Would it be sufficient to leave my dies set up for the light crimp I use on plated bullets? Do they require special treatment?

I'm probably wrong but I bell the case to aid in bullet seating and crimp only to remove the bell. (When loading 357 mag I crimp the cannelure firmly.) The groves you are seeing are for the bullet lube that's normally used with cast bullets.

Your light crimp should be fine. If you're using a factory barrel the OAL may be OK.

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Im was wondering the same things.... thanks for enlightening us...

Would it be fair to say the 135's would be a great compromise between the 124 & the 147 ?

Also why dont other is there such a small mount of mfg's who make 135's ??

To me (in my mind at least), it seems the 135's would be softer than 124s but cycle faster than the 147's...... best of both worlds ???

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Im was wondering the same things.... thanks for enlightening us...

Would it be fair to say the 135's would be a great compromise between the 124 & the 147 ?

Also why dont other is there such a small mount of mfg's who make 135's ??

To me (in my mind at least), it seems the 135's would be softer than 124s but cycle faster than the 147's...... best of both worlds ???

If you go to MG website you'll see that lighter bullets cost less, they require less material. (look at case pricing)

With a great number of shooters using steel frame guns they don't even feel the 124 gr as having too much recoil so why would they bother paying more to shoot a heavier bullets?

You bring up a good point about splitting between the two but I'll let someone else do the research on the 135 gr bullet.

Maybe next year there will be a new favorite load that I'll try but my supplies are set for the coming season.

I've been chasing the Holly Grail of powder / bullet combo's for a little while, (trying to make up for my poor shooting skills), and pretty much end where many other have. 124 gr JHP work very well!

YMMV

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Im was wondering the same things.... thanks for enlightening us...

Would it be fair to say the 135's would be a great compromise between the 124 & the 147 ?

Also why dont other is there such a small mount of mfg's who make 135's ??

To me (in my mind at least), it seems the 135's would be softer than 124s but cycle faster than the 147's...... best of both worlds ???

For me, the Bayou 147’s are more accurate. Still trying to find "the" load for the 135 grain ones. I've tried a number of ones posted here but not seeing accuracy equal to the heavier bullets.

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  • 5 months later...

Just finished a trip down the road to Gramercy yesterday and bought 1,000 rnds each of .40 S&W 180gr. and 9mm 124gr. I also got a sample pack of 110 gr. to try in .380 Auto. I'm assuming that a crimp that is just enough to remove the bell should be sufficient for the 9mm bullets. I loaded a few .40s yesterday and found that I needed to lower the RCBS crimp a bit just to size the bullet so that it would feed into my SR40. I loaded with HS-6 and used Lyman 49 as a guide for lead bullet powder dose and OAL. I'll load some 9mms this afternoon with WSF and see how they fly tomorrow.

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I shoot the 135gr over 3.7gr Win 231 for around 930 - 950 fps. (6" bbl) In talking with Donnie, he states that the groove is not a crimp groove and that these bullets should be taper crimped. Good enough for me. I set up my shorty 38 dies with a 9mm taper crimp die and have shot thousands of them. Accuracy is good, velocity is good and, I don't have any seating depth trouble like I did with the 147 bullets. (My Fusion has a rather tight chamber and I run my COL at 1.100. 147s don't leave much room.) I had no luck with roll crimping them, but then, I don't roll crimp plated either... I shoot mostly steel, and find that the 147s give a very gentle push for recoil, but really hammer the plates! The 135s are a good compromise in recoil and hit the steel hard too. Several companies sell the 135s. Sometimes you will find them listed with the 38 super bullets. I have shot 3 or 4 thousand of the 147, and a case plus of the 135. Nice bullets. Great gentleman on the other end of the phone!

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