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Is time of the essence in removal of lead from .22 barrels


critterdoc
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It's been a long time since I fired a .22 and I'm hoping someone here can advise on the "need for speed" when removing lead from the barrel after sending several hundred rounds of non-guilder bullets down the tube. I recently saw a reference that suggested that cleaning is recommended when the barrel is still warm which leads [no pun intended] me to question whether or not lead adheres more tenaciously to lands and grooves over a period of 24 hours.

I recently picked up a Bersa BT22 mouse gun to test drive at the range. Accuracy will be a priority, and with the shortage of .22 ammo that appears to be accelerating I expect to be firing a large number of unguilded but waxed lead bullets in the foreseeable future. I'd appreciate advice on how passage of time effects bonding of lead within the barrel.

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If there is a lot of old grud I will run a wet patch of Hoppes and let the gun sit awhile. Then use a bronze brush and patch, but usually I just use a Bore Snake with G96 after I'm through shooting. I try not to over think it to much.

Edited by toothguy
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If there is a lot of old grud I will run a wet patch of Hoppes and let the gun sit awhile. Then use a bronze brush and patch, but usually I just use a Bore Snake with G96 after I'm through shooting. I try not to over think it to much.

As I've gotten older, thinking too much has become a survival tactic.

I'm good to go with product and looking forward to testing Steel Shield's recently released Weapon Shield Solvent on lead - along with a bronze brush and Brownell's Bronze Wool.

What I'm really seeking is comment from someone who can speak with some authority on the physical chemistry of leading.

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Back when I shot NRA small bore silhoutte it shocked me to learn that a lot of those guys cleaned seldom to never. The thinking was that, usually, more damage is done to the gun by cleaning it. Therefore - clean when it accuracy falls off or when it no longer feeds well - like toothguy, I too like the bore snakes.

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According to what I have read, 22 caliber rimfire barrels to not lead up. And, I must say, any lead I have removed from my 22's has been loose . . . easily pushed out with a patch, or brush.

Here is what the manual for my Gunslick Foul Out III, Electrochemical Bore Cleaning System states: "metal fouling is sledom present in 22 caliber rimfire firearms".

I can quickly tell when the accuracy of my Ruger Mark III starts to go away. And, a quick brush followed by a "wet" patch is all it takes to tighten the group back up.

Having said all that, I am old school . . . my 22 bores get cleaned after every match, or practice session.

Edited by Reshoot
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.

Here is what the manual for my Gunslick Foul Out III, Electrochemical Bore Cleaning System states: "metal fouling is sledom present in 22 caliber rimfire firearms".

.

I have found this to be the case as well when I tried my Outers Foul Out III. on numerous old 22's of mine- no leading! I was very surprised.

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From a competitive Silhouette shooter: DO NOT CLEAN your .22 barrels.

Dry patch only when accuracy falls off. When dry patching alone does not bring accuracy back, then it is time to use wipeout on the barrel.

It will take 200 rounds before the rifle or pistol starts to group again off of a clean barrel.

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Depends on the barrel, IMO.

For my smallbore 3 Position rifles or Bullseye pistols, I clean when I get off-call shots. A patch or two wet with Kroil or even WD-40 usually gets it done. My M&P 22 pistol leaded terribly, but still functioned 100% and shot pretty well when dirty. A patch would come out with sheets, not flecks of lead on it! After a handful of firelapping rounds, it cleans up like the others and shoots as well as ever.

YMMV of course and there are many ways to skin a cat

Mark

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I bought my Browning Medalist when I was 18 cleaned it thouroughly to establish a baseline in 24 years

my cleaning regimen is crown,breechface,boltface with a swab or T-shirt patch

in all those years I have swabbed the bore once more and detailed strip twice as the once piece grips are tricky to put on and off without breaking them.

My Dads has had a cleaning rod down the bore 3 times in 47 years.

they both shoot cloverleafs from a rest @ 50ft. with CCI Match

with the self lubing qualities of most lead .22LR unless your feeding it all high speed plated you should never have to clean the bore

my 10-22 I use for squirrels will get a boresnake or a patch if I get caught out in the rain ( Rimfire Central has a post on drilling the receiver so you can run the rod through in the proper direction.) but more as a precaution of water in the barrel causing problems than leading concerns.

John

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