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New Reloader here.....is the 650


dtt255
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Too difficult for someone who has never reloaded before, to learn how to use?

I have read books and know the details, but have never had the ability to reload. I am ready to purchase a press and was wondering if the 650 is too hard for a beginner.

Any help is great.

Thanks

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You can do it! However, it would be to your advantage to have someone kind of "show you the ropes". If you put your location on here, there is likely somebody around that is a BE member that could drop by & give you a few hints.

If that isn't possible, may I suggest you buy the instructional video?

MLM

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Mitch, which press you buy depends on a number of things:

1. how many calibers are you going to load for?

2. how many rounds/year are you going to load?

3. how many hours/month do you want to reload?

4. how mechanically inclined are you?

I load for 9mm, solo (no rifle) and have reloaded up to 12,000 rounds

in one year (250 rounds/week) which I have reloaded in one hour of

reloading/week, with a Square Deal.

I'm not mechanically inclinde at all - can't put a screw back into a

hole I just took it out of - so I don't see any advantage TO ME to try

to buy a 650.

I like the idea that I inspect each cartridge case as I load it into the

SqD - not sure how people inspect cases in a case hopper???

I get to sort out undesireable headstamps (S&B, A-Merc, etc) &

cases that are the wrong caliber or split.

Don't like the idea of spending $1500 for a 650 complete set, vs

$500 for a SqD, either. But, that's just me.

If you're handy and have the money, and want to reload rifle

cartridges in large quantity (.223?) - the 650 looks like a fantastic

reloading machine - just not for me. :cheers:

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Dtt255, I would say you know lots of people that reload right here in the benoverse.

If you post your location with a request for help I bet someone is more than willing to meet you and help out. I know I am if you happened to be in Minnesota around the Twin cities. I have done that twice with 650's in the last few years.

I would say that a progressive press is actually better than a single stage for someone starting out then a single stage because the press keeps things in order and in good quality.

Welcome to the board!

Retread

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I was in your exact same spot about three years ago when I purchased my 650 from BEnos. I had a very experienced reloader set it up for me and show me how it worked. I've never regretted the purchase. I've loaded something like 20K rounds of 40 with only a few head scratching moments.

They are great machines!

Edited by SV-COP
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It's pretty scary making the jump from single to Dillon progressive but it's a lot of fun once you get comfortable. Take your time and ignore the rounds per hour that Dillon says it will do. PM me and we can swap emails. You can email me anytime if you get stuck or have a question.

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Too difficult for someone who has never reloaded before, to learn how to use?

I have read books and know the details, but have never had the ability to reload. I am ready to purchase a press and was wondering if the 650 is too hard for a beginner.

Any help is great.

Thanks

Absolutely Not too difficult. In fact your safer learning on a 650 then a single stage if you load one case at a time and don't use the case feeder. Reloading is not hard. It just is a detail intensive process. The Dillon Manual explains those details very well. Get a reloading manual and use a common powder and projectile to make that process easier at the start.

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The 650 was my first press, well worth the money. I thought the same thing, but the manual is great, and now there are many Youtube videos to watch as well. If you break or lose something, or get into a bind, you can always call Dillon. The operators know the press and can send you what you need or help you sort out any problems. There is also tons of info here in the Dillon section.

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My zip code is 92203. Indio, Ca. I personally don't know of anyone around here who reloads never the less uses a dillon press. I will order the dvd with it and have watched countless videos on youtube.

I am just trying to get supplies before I decide to get the actual press. Obviously the choices are the L-N-L and the 650. Wish I could find a used 650 for cheaper and then use the BS warranty but nobody sells theirs! Guess that is a testament to Dillon right there.

I appreciate the help and advice everyone is giving me!

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Oh I never answered the questions asked above. Sorry about that.

I shoot (on a regular basis

9 mm

45 cal

40 cal

.223 cal

and .308 cal

So I would obviously like to reload those. I am a 'backup' kind of person. So unless I have 10k of each round I have a weapon for, I feel like I don't have enough :)

At some point the auto case and bullet feeder would be a plus, but not trying to go to fast.

Biggest issue I have no is finding small pistol primers. lol but everyone is having those issues now I think.

I have never calculated how much I shot. I guess because there was never a shortage of ammo to worry about.

I am pretty mechanically inclined so I am not worried so much about that.

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Pretty sure 308 is a issue on the LnL. The press is indexing as the ram is going up and the bullets hit the tool head.

Dillon cost more because it is better. Caliber specific conversion parts vs generic parts to cover a variety of calibers. Trust me having owned both the 650 is way better.

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My zip code is 92203. Indio, Ca. I personally don't know of anyone around here who reloads never the less uses a dillon press. I will order the dvd with it and have watched countless videos on youtube.

I am just trying to get supplies before I decide to get the actual press. Obviously the choices are the L-N-L and the 650. Wish I could find a used 650 for cheaper and then use the BS warranty but nobody sells theirs! Guess that is a testament to Dillon right there.

I appreciate the help and advice everyone is giving me!

Go to one USPSA match and I would bet 60% own a Dillon and 20% own a 650. Just make some friends.

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Had a couple of 550's before moving to a 650. Short runs I like the 550 especially in rifle calibers. The 650 will load a run of pistol calibers quicker than a 550 but takes a little longer to switch calibers better suited on longer runs of several thousand.

If your not willing to go all the way with a 650, case feeder, strong mounts etc then look at the 550. Dropping cases down the tube takes longer than manually feeding a 550. Set up time, caliber changes are about half the time of a 650. 650 is a good machine and I'm glad I have one but if your going to do short runs of five calibers might like a 550, it's a good machine also just a little slower production rate.

650 needs a strong mount so you can work under the press if something breaks. 550 can bolt flat to the bench as there's no need to work under the press.

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Had a couple of 550's before moving to a 650. Short runs I like the 550 especially in rifle calibers. The 650 will load a run of pistol calibers quicker than a 550 but takes a little longer to switch calibers better suited on longer runs of several thousand.

If your not willing to go all the way with a 650, case feeder, strong mounts etc then look at the 550. Dropping cases down the tube takes longer than manually feeding a 550. Set up time, caliber changes are about half the time of a 650. 650 is a good machine and I'm glad I have one but if your going to do short runs of five calibers might like a 550, it's a good machine also just a little slower production rate.

650 needs a strong mount so you can work under the press if something breaks. 550 can bolt flat to the bench as there's no need to work under the press.

+1, you can get a case feeder for the 550 also. I think the big advantage to the 650 is the auto index feature. If you plan on switching calibers a lot the 550 is a good machine.

Edited by toothguy
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550 case feeder is a PITA and does not do rifle. To me it ruins the 550. 550 is a great press. Simplicity is its strength. The 550 case feeder makes it near impossible to use for anything besides what will work in the feeder. The feeder won't do 380 and is fussy to adjust when you do convert it. Pass on the case feeder on the 550 or just get the 650.

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Think about it carefully and read/re-read the "Which Dillon" FAQ. Dillon is the way to go, but it is crucial that you properly consider your use cases to determine which press would serve best. From the basic information you provided above, it seems to me you would be much better served with a 550 over a 650. I have one and it is perfect for the purpose I use it for.

I now have a 1050 on order, just to use for 223, and the 650/1050 presses are much better used as single caliber presses, or at least infrequent caliber changes. If you're bound and determined to go with the 650, be sure to read all you can and watch the YouTube videos about changing calibers to see what you will be getting into? The 550 is made for quick changes; the 650 not so much.

Skip the DVD - there's plenty of info on YouTube.

And be prepared to wait many weeks... Unless you find a vendor/seller with one in stock, you are likely looking at 4-6 weeks for fulfillment. I ordered my 1050 over two weeks ago now and still no word on expected ship time... Things have only gotten worse since then.

Good luck; take your time, make a wise buying decision and it will last you a very long time serving up your ammo needs!

Roger

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Well I decided and pulled the trigger on the 650 and ordered the setup for just 9mm for now. I figured since I have never reloaded before, I think this is the best move.

I plan on doing other calibers but since I am brand new to this, I have been advised to concentrate on one caliber to start. I know in the future I will start to use the 650 for more mass production and therefore will utilize it more for what it was intended for.

After I get comfortable with reloading in general I will feel warranted in getting different calibers and then will spend time to do larger runs with each caliber.

I know the rifle calibers are a whole different monster then pistol. So I thought starting 'small' might be the best move. When I feel I know pistol basically enough ( I do realize it is a continual learning process) I will probably get a single stage to learn precise rifle, then after that go for production of .223 and 7.62x39 on the 650.

So that is the plan...but we all know what happens to plans.... :goof:

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You should be ok as long as you take your time. Do not force it if any binding occurs. That means something is not in right. Also, to ease reloading, use a case lube even if your dies are carbide. Makes it easier. Oal slightly differs.

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Good choice and I'm sure you'll enjoy the press. Just a few tips if you don't mind. 9mm can be a pain to load because of the brass. If your using range brass, I do then spend a little time inspecting brass. After it's cleaned I'll stand cases up on a table. Using a pencile to heard them around I'll look down into the cases looking for splits, chigger bites on the case mouth and berdan primers along with anything that may be in the case. It's easy to spot .380 or Super 38 cases at this point also. Then I'll pick them up and chunk any that are Military, have crimped primers or than went through an Open Gun, primers will be flat. Military cases have a smaller case volume. I'll store inspected cases in a five gallon bucket ready for a loading session.

Always lube cases. It's easier on the dies, brass, press and the operator. Just a little lube makes the whole process easier.

Dies, I'm a fan of Lee's dies they will size closer to the extractor groove than some other brands and have an excellent primer punch. Lee's seating dies have a adjustment knob for small adjustments. You can mark the knob with a sharpie for quick change over on bullet weights. At present I'm running Lee's standard sizer, Lee's seating die and a Dillon crimp die in 9mm minor. Have problems with OAL? For a few bucks Lee will cut an insert to fit the bullet you send them. Lee's die sets are on sale in the Jan Midway flyer under $40 bucks. Lee's locking nuts are weak I'd order a set of locking nuts from Dillon. May need to lock Lee's sizer from the bottom of the tool head as the thread depth is shorter than Dillon. If you order a Lee Die set pick up a few extra primer punches also. They will usually push up instead of breaking but breaks will happen if there's something in the case.

Try and mount the press level, it will run smoother. Someone comes in stop finish the conversation before going back to loading. I'm not racing when loading, mistakes will happen watch what your doing. Several things are happening at once. It won't be long before you understand the machine, it's amazing how many rounds you can do in an hour.

Always put the powder cap back on, if a primer gets into the powder measure it can be bad. Learning to replace the cap as soon as possible can avoid problems. Putting a small piece of screen in the bottom of the powder meaqsure will catch any foreign material that may find it's way into the measure. Had that happen last year with a small piece of metal that was in a can of powder.

Edited by Bob DuBois
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Good Choice. I have a 550B and a 650 both with all the trimmings. The 650 will take longer to perfect but once you do you will be glad you chose it. There are plenty of good videos on Youtube that will walk you through the process. While you wait on shipping watch them all. :) Good luck

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550 case feeder is a PITA and does not do rifle. To me it ruins the 550. 550 is a great press. Simplicity is its strength. The 550 case feeder makes it near impossible to use for anything besides what will work in the feeder. The feeder won't do 380 and is fussy to adjust when you do convert it. Pass on the case feeder on the 550 or just get the 650.

I have used a friends 550 but it did not have the case feeder. Good to Know.

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