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Masaki Dragon Gun


toothguy
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MODS,

Maybe this should be moved to the What I Like section or What I Hate.

I just thought it was an innovative idea for an open gun that might provide some inspiration. The barrel is like a 41 and the slide has half the mass for low recoil and high accuracy.

Edited by toothguy
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MODS,

Maybe this should be moved to the What I Like section or What I Hate.

I just thought it was an innovative idea for an open gun that might provide some inspiration. The barrel is like a 41 and the slide has half the mass for low recoil and high accuracy.

Possibly some application for an Open gun, but why a bullseye pistol. They have all the time in the world between shots. If it improves accuracy of the gun, fine, but that was not the intent of the video.

Some gunsmith in Ohio played around with making a blowback gun for USPSA a while back. It may be popular locally but I've not heard or seen anything about it in a long time.

Bill

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No, but you do need the gun to function. Most guns are set up with an ultradot on the slide, which slows things down alot. I use a 10lb spring in all my wad guns. Then there is accuracy. You can reduce your powder charge, but accuracy tends to suffer. I've done alot of accuracy testing at 50 yards, and to be honest, if your gun can't shoot 1.5" 10 shot groups or less, your leaving some on the table. The tried and true loads are 4 grains of bullseye or 3.8 grains of clays with a 200 grain swc. Not a hot load by any strech, but again rapid fire is 5 shots in ten seconds one handed, and the x ring is not that big.

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rapid fire is 5 shots in ten seconds

:yawn:

Why the disrespect?

No disrespect at all. It's just that even for me 10 seconds is an eternity. I have watched plenty of bullseye matches at our club and I just don't see how that would help a USPSA shooter any more than practicing on real USPSA targets under realistic time constraints. I'm not knocking the games you play but they still make me drowsy.

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No disrespect at all. It's just that even for me 10 seconds is an eternity. I have watched plenty of bullseye matches at our club and I just don't see how that would help a USPSA shooter any more than practicing on real USPSA targets under realistic time constraints. I'm not knocking the games you play but they still make me drowsy.

Oh Sorry! I hadn't realized this was a USPSA only forum.

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None taken, and I agree. Kind of like watching paint dry if your watching, or taken out behind the alley and whooped if your shooting. :roflol: Trigger control and sight alignment are the two biggest benefits from shooting it.

Forgot to add strong hand only shooting as well.

Edited by bull2700
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No disrespect at all. It's just that even for me 10 seconds is an eternity. I have watched plenty of bullseye matches at our club and I just don't see how that would help a USPSA shooter any more than practicing on real USPSA targets under realistic time constraints. I'm not knocking the games you play but they still make me drowsy.

Oh Sorry! I hadn't realized this was a USPSA only forum.

Well, it is in the Open pistol section of a predominantly USPSA forum.

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No disrespect at all. It's just that even for me 10 seconds is an eternity. I have watched plenty of bullseye matches at our club and I just don't see how that would help a USPSA shooter any more than practicing on real USPSA targets under realistic time constraints. I'm not knocking the games you play but they still make me drowsy.

Oh Sorry! I hadn't realized this was a USPSA only forum.

Well, it is in the Open pistol section of a predominantly USPSA forum.

I really just thought it was an interesting open gun design, using out of the box thinking, it was so different from a traditional Bullseye gun. Good ideas can be obtained from many sources, even Bullseye. I wasn't trying to start anything but I have tremendous respect for Bullseye shooters. I'm a big Brian Zins fan.

Edited by toothguy
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the one thing I noticed while watching both sequences was that the recoil impulse was about the same for both. a little less with the dragon gun. I have a comped .45 from the old days and I think it recoils less than both of em with WWB ammo. :mellow:

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the one thing I noticed while watching both sequences was that the recoil impulse was about the same for both. a little less with the dragon gun. I have a comped .45 from the old days and I think it recoils less than both of em with WWB ammo. :mellow:

To me it looks like about half the recoil for the dragon. I'm curious if that is from the compensator or because the dragons slide is so much lighter. Since the 45 acp is low pressure I wonder how much more effective the comp would be with 38 super. Also does the fixed barrel make the gun more reliable. It would be interesting to run a standard comp on the fixed barrel design with 38 super and compare comps.

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NRA Standard Pistol (one hand bullseye shooting) is generally composed of three 90 round events.

22 LR

45 ACP

Any centerfire. (most shooters shoot the 45 in this portion too)

Slow Fire SF (two strings of 10 rounds @ 10 minutes each)

Timed Fire TF ( four strings of 5 rounds @ 20 seconds each)

Rapid Fire RF (four strings of 5 rounds @ 10 seconds each)

The National Match course (10 rounds each SF. TF and RF)

Total= 90 rounds each round worth 10 points. If you shoot "clean" 900 points.

To reach master (if I remember you must average 90%) High Master (97%)

Oh yea boys…it is way easy…just try it and come back here a crow about your %70!

Exciting as watching paint dry IF you are just watching. Your mind if ALL IN if you are on your last string or two and you are clean!

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I shot bullseye for a few years, and to do well is tough!

Bullseye, trap, and skeet were what I did when I started shooting. All of which are repetitive, but, require concentration.

Even though I'll occasionally shoot all three, I now prefer USPSA, IDPA, multi-gun, and sporting clays, because of the variety. Even when you think you know how you are going to shoot a USPSA stage, before the buzzer goes off, sometimes your plan changes. :surprise:

I've often thought a fixed bbl pistol, should be able to be made less expensive than a 1911/2011 style, with better accuracy, but, I've never actually seen where anybody had built one in a centerfire.

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I shot bullseye for a few years, and to do well is tough!

Bullseye, trap, and skeet were what I did when I started shooting. All of which are repetitive, but, require concentration.

Even though I'll occasionally shoot all three, I now prefer USPSA, IDPA, multi-gun, and sporting clays, because of the variety. Even when you think you know how you are going to shoot a USPSA stage, before the buzzer goes off, sometimes your plan changes. :surprise:

I've often thought a fixed bbl pistol, should be able to be made less expensive than a 1911/2011 style, with better accuracy, but, I've never actually seen where anybody had built one in a centerfire.

That's what I was wondering, could this idea be used in an area other than Bullseye. Could you use this idea and transform a Trubor?

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