Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Lead levels in your blood


Solvability
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 84
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Blood letting isn’t imo going to help with lead.  The body confuses lead and calcium and uses lead where calcium should go.  It’s the calcium in nerve signalling that is so damaging to young children.  Lead is used interchangeably with calcium and really messes with the neurons in the developing brain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Came across this today.

 

 

Quote

MCP protects against uranium

 

If there are toxic heavy metals in your diet, you as an individual can do little about it. Supplementing with Modified Citrus Pectin [MCP] makes that heavy metals leave your body faster. MCP may even protect against radioactive uranium.

 

 

 

 

MCP protects against uranium

 

 

 

MCP
MCP contains sugar chains that can form complexes with heavy metals in the body. The body then excretes these complexes through urine or faeces, reducing the concentration of heavy metals.

 

In an experiment in which subjects took MCP for 6 days, their bodies got rid of 150 percent more cadmium and 560 percent more lead through their urine on day 6. [Phytother Res. 2006 Oct;20(10):859-64.] In another human study, supplementation with MCP stimulated mercury excretion. [Clin Toxicol (Phila). Jun-Aug 2007;45(5):476-81.]

 

 

MCP protects against uranium

In 2007, German researchers and scientists from Belarus published a study in which they gave Vitapect, a citrus pectin supplement, to children living near an exploded nuclear reactor. [Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2007;125(1-4):523-6.] The supplement reduced the amount of radioactive cesium-137 in the children's bodies.

 

 

Study
In 2019, researchers at Econugenics, [econugenics.com] an American supplement manufacturer, published a case study in which they treated an American family of 6 people with PectaSol Metal Detox, a product from Econugenics that contains MCP and alginate.

 

The family lived in Arizona, in an area where there is a relatively large amount of uranium in drinking water and food. The subjects took 3 grams of MCP and 1.5 grams of alginate every day for 6 weeks. This dose was divided over two intake moments.

 

Results
During the trial, the researchers monitored the amount of uranium in the subjects' feces. 6 days and 6 weeks after supplementation started, for most family members, this amount had increased significantly.

 

Conclusion
"This family case study results, including the significant decrease in uranium excretion after stopping the supplement for 6-weeks, [...] suggest that the MCP/alginate supplement, can be used safely on a long-term basis to address concerns of ongoing low-level environmental and dietary uranium exposure, and potentially reduce body burden and negative health effects", write the researchers.

 

"This is the first report of a supplement promoting uranium excretion, suggesting it has the potential to reduce negative health effects in expanding regions where chronic uranium exposure is known. Larger studies are needed to further explore the potential of this supplement to address the issue of widespread uranium exposure and its risks for serious health consequences."

 

https://www.iherb.com/c/Pectin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

A guy I was squadding with ate at all 6 stage points. Two cheeseburgers, a sandwich, trail mix, and lots of  jerky, all with hands on the food. Said he was in his max cycle of his lifting phase and had to keep his calories up. After reading his thread, I started thinking about how much lead he may have injested.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a blood test during a time when I was shooting a lot, both indoors and outdoors. I was not not reloading or handling spent brass, though.

 

Lead levels were undetectable. My habits were: never touch face or food when shooting, wash hands and face immediately after shooting, and take a cool shower and change clothes when I arrive at home.

 

So, it is certainly possible to eliminate lead exposure if you are just a shooter. Reloading is a different issue.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Stafford said:

A guy I was squadding with ate at all 6 stage points. Two cheeseburgers, a sandwich, trail mix, and lots of  jerky, all with hands on the food. Said he was in his max cycle of his lifting phase and had to keep his calories up. After reading his thread, I started thinking about how much lead he may have injested.

I read this a few years ago, it pertains more to the military and covers some smaller exposure areas as well.  I found it to be an interesting study on heavy metals and the human body in general.

https://ndiastorage.blob.core.usgovcloudapi.net/ndia/2014/armaments/TuesSchatz.pdf

 

As rule if I have to eat at a match and can't properly wash at least my hands, then it I use some kind of barrier. Either the wrapper it came in or a folded paper towel that was retrieved from an unexposed location.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get tested annually at work for the past 15 years, and have really only washed my hands with cold water/soap or used d-lead wipes at matches or places without running water.  my lead  levels are undetectable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Bumping this very long running thread.

 

I practiced excellent range hygiene, and don’t actually touch bullets while reloading. My children have always been below the reference level.

 

When I got a BLL test this spring I was over 9 times the reference level. Shooting multiple times a week in poorly ventilated indoor ranges — and running matches and shooters in those same ranges — got me there in about two years. 
 

I stopped shooting indoors entirely. Six weeks later my levels had declined 18%, and I’m hopeful my next test will reveal a similar decline. I was in a range where chelation was recommended, but I figured I’d reduce exposure first.

 

In those six weeks between test 1 and test 2 I attended a couple of majors and multiple locals. I continued to shoot live fire 2-3 times a week relatively high volume.

 

I’m pretty confident the long term solution for me is no indoor ranges — certainly not for high volume practice, and definitely not as match staff inhaling vast clouds of aerosolized lead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My lead level saga has been interesting. Never terribly high, but it was increasing so I decided to take steps. I initially tested at 5.1  three years ago. I shoot outdoors and reload quite a bit. Prior to that first test I would wash my hands, but didn't think about ingesting stuff at all.

 

After that first test, I made hand washing a priority. Stopped eating/drinking when reloading, didn't eat at the range. Would wash my hands thoroughly 2-3 times prior to leaving range. 1 year later, I tested out at 5.7! Not a huge increase, still not a large number, but I still found it troubling.

 

I then switched to using D-Lead wipes and soap. Use a couple wipes at the range, plus wash hands. Wash my hands 2-3 times with the soap when reloading or working with related things at home. After one year of that, my BLL test showed 3.7.  

 

TL;DR - the D-Lead stuff works really well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...