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Starting out a live fire practice session by squeezing off a few rounds of my friend's 454 Casual seemed less effective. Out of the gate my body felt like I had already shot three or four hundred round.

Speaking of which are is there a maximum round count recommendation for effective live fire practice?

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A friend usually starts off practice with 50 or so rounds of .22. It works for himbut never has done much for me.

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I usually do ~200 in about a two hour practice. This consists of several runs on a practice field course and I go until I'm out of ammo or stop learning. I always finish with basic accuracy at a static line.

I used to do 300+ but time was less of a factor back then. Now I get to the range in the am and usually have honey dues in the pm.

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200 to 300 is about my limit before i start getting sloppy. 200 on a hot-n-humid day 300 in the evening. I finish shooting some groups at 15 to 20yds. :cheers:

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I usually get bored after 250 rounds or so, but make sure to finish with group shooting at say 25yds - that way you can be sure the gun is still sighted in for the next time you need it!

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If you pick specific goals and drills 100 rounds can do it. Generally, I pick 2-3 things and almost never do stages. I've found I average 150-200 rounds a practice.

Groups

Bill drills

Entries

Might be a practice, another could be...

El Presidente

Near to far drill

Transitions

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I like to do 200-300. I also will do smaller sesssion of 50-100 if I just want to work on something specific. But I have the range right here at the house and can walk out there anytime.

Record the drills and their results to chart progress.

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I normally shoot 350 to 400 for a practice session.

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Low round ct high instensity drills are my favorite.

Make sure you are learning something with every shot, otherwise you are wasting time and money.

Also, regular short sessions are way better than long infrequent sessions.

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Low count hi intensity. As in which drills?

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I just take my current weakness (or area of desired improvement) and design drills around them.

Usually something I can't do, or can't do well. My last practice session was shooting while moving sideways at 15 yards, two steel and one paper. 4 shots for the whole drill. You can do that a bunch with 200 rds.

SA

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I travel for work a lot, and don't have the time to practice. I find that when I do get home to practice, it usually takes about 2 weeks of weekly steel matches before I can have the confidence to start shooting like I know I can. Practice is very important, but doing a bad practice is more detrimental than not practicing at all. Think of it like a field goal kicker...he can practice kicking the ball with the heel of his foot, all day long, but will never make a field goal cause he was practicing wrong.

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I always work on something (or a couple somethings) specific and ALWAYS end on a high note. Doing those things keeps me focused on what I've learned during the practice without the distractions of frustration and annoyance that come with fatigue.

Mark

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I always work on something (or a couple somethings) specific and ALWAYS end on a high note.

That's a good one. Or if you don't end on a high note, end with something fun - without any caring involved.

be

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I always work on something (or a couple somethings) specific and ALWAYS end on a high note.

That's a good one. Or if you don't end on a high note, end with something fun - without any caring involved.

be

.22 and a golf ball in the bay. Shoot it until the stuffing disappears. Try and hit it before it comes to rest too. My daughters 10/22 Archangel with a dot will do this all night long.

Edited by benos

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75 to 100 seems to be my magic number. It usually takes about an hour to run the drills that I do. After an hour my focus takes a pretty big dip.

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I usually do two to three hundred. Last weekend it was bill drill, Texas star, then a combo of the two. Start a bill drill at 12 yards, reload, and move to weak side to a spot to hit the star from at 13 yards. That's my way of putting several skills into only a few drills. Works great for me.

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Based on my schedule and the distance I have to travel to get any real (i.e. non-static) practice in, I was forced to do LONG practice sessions once a week to shoot the volume I desired.

The last 30% of that (on a good day) was pretty well wasted most of the time. Not so much because I was fatigued, but because it was far too easy to lose focus and just start slinging rounds.

Now I shoot a static day (or two) per week of 200-300 rounds-- accuracy, SHO/WHO, draws, single target stuff, etc. And then a "real" day of 500-600 rounds, doing everything you can't pull off at an indoor public range.

It's still a struggle sometimes to keep your "eye on the prize" and learn something from every shot, but it's notably easier than dumping 800-1k in one session per week.

That said... I know of one World Champ that lives around here who shoots 1k+ per session, and doesn't get to do it as often as he'd like... But he's super-human, and has been doing it for... wow... 18 years? :roflol:

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Shoot until you get tired, taking breaks in between while having fun at the range. When it gets tedious and not fun anymore, then pack it up and go home, until next time again. Oh, try practicing with less punishing gun like a .22, 9mm, etc...I guess, anything less than a .454 Casull :cheers:

Edited by g mac

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my practice sessions are usually between 200-250. I dont have alot of time for live fire so I just shoot full power stuff; no .22 for me. it really helped once I started using a structured practice regimen. one session is devoted to different things like movement, etc.

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Looks like ill try 100 rounds 3 to 4 times a week. Unless im working on calling shoots and ill shoot 200 rounds watching the front sight moving dont care where the bullet goes, as long as its safe. Plus when my friends come to practice but that less structured. More like friends seeing who is the best that day!

Edited by a matt

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All great stuff.

I like to work on one puzzle/area at a time.

I will break the pieces apart, running the course dry a handful of times,or until I can have everything feeling smooth.

Then piece it back together and analyze the outcome with live fire.

Amazing how much only 50 rnds. will get you.

Having a friend, or video to critque everything you are doing in my book is VERY valueable.

Texas Stars,etc. are a lot of fun and all,but to burn 100 rounds to shave .XX seconds as opposed to

really breaking down fundamental shooting/movement is worth a lot more.

Amazing how much of shooting is Mental over Physical ability.

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All great stuff.

I like to work on one puzzle/area at a time.

I will break the pieces apart, running the course dry a handful of times,or until I can have everything feeling smooth.

Then piece it back together and analyze the outcome with live fire.

Amazing how much only 50 rnds. will get you.

Having a friend, or video to critque everything you are doing in my book is VERY valueable.

Texas Stars,etc. are a lot of fun and all,but to burn 100 rounds to shave .XX seconds as opposed to

really breaking down fundamental shooting/movement is worth a lot more.

Amazing how much of shooting is Mental over Physical ability.

+1000

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The only practice I have access to is in a public range. I am allowed to draw from a holster though. Any good static drills you recommend?

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