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Dusty

Atlas bipod

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Anyone use these for any length of time? How is the height? Did you get the extensions?

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I have not, but I will pass on to you some comments I have seen frequently made by people who have a ton more experience than I have. The Atlas bipod is arguably the best bipod made. But, for most people, there is nothing that it will do that a Harris can't handle. And do it for a lot less money. IOW, it's simply not worth the added cost.

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I have Atlas bipods mounted on a few of my rifles. I also have Harris bipods as well as a factory AI bipod. The Atlas is a very well made item, but that is not it's strongest feature. The ability to lock it's legs independently at many different angles, not just open or closed, is the main thing that sets it apart from all the other precision bipods on the market. It also has the smoothest pan and tilt of anything on the market. Shooting off an Atlas is like shooting off a front bag, supper stable and smooth. The negative points are that it is slower to deploy than a 2 position bipod, especially slower compared to an AI. It is more money than the Harris, but is similarly priced or even cheaper than an AI bipod. I do not have the extension legs, nor have I ever felt like I needed them. If you need and or want the features then get the Atlas, if not get whatever you like. If you are just shooting from a bench then you would be better served with a good front bag.

:cheers:

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I have a Atlas v7 or v8 and a Harris BRMS 6-9 with PodLock, the Atlas is better in every way over the Harris except speed of deployment, when loading the bipod, the Harris can slip because of its fixed position, on concrete it's almost impossible, the Atlas breaks over center allowing much more force to be applied foward, loading the Atlas is super easy, shooting from the goofy positions like roof tops the ability to extend the legs at a 45degree angle is nice, the Harris is either deployed or stowed, the Harris is easier to attach to the forearm because it attaches to a sling stud, the Atlas needs a Rail installed, I did a how to install a rail on a McM A5 in the gunsmithing section on Snipers Hide, I even payed it foward with tools to DIY.

http://www.snipershide.com/forum/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=1143101#Post1143101

IMHO a Atlas is the best bipod out there, I do not have extensions on mine, and have not seen a need for any, I also prefer the rubber feet that comes with it, there soft and work well on concrete grass dirt sand mudd.

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shooting from the goofy positions like roof tops the ability to extend the legs at a 45degree angle is nice

I think that you have just made my point. I will concede that the Atlas is superior to the Harris, but many of the features that make it so are of no use to Joe Average. Shooting from a roof top is not something the average person will need to do.

A Harris 6-9" BRS with a swivel lock will handle almost everything most people need. The leg length is independently adjustable and the tilt can be quickly adjusted. It's fairly easy to load the bipod, even on concrete and it's certainly strong enough for that.

It's all a matter of bang for the buck. I've shot with and talked with a number of people who do it for a living and they all use a Harris.

So who are you to decide what "Joe Average" needs, or if he or she will need or want to shoot from anything other than a bench or nice concrete slab? The OP asked a question and even though you have NO relevant first hand experience, you choose to interject your opinion. It does not matter who you have shot with, or spoken with, if you have not been PERSONALLY using an Atlas bipod for some length of time then you have no standing to offer up an opinion of any merit. While I agree that for many purposes the Atlas it not the best choice, and that they are expensive, but they do offer features that are not found in any other product and if you need those features then they represent a good value. F class guys spend a fair bit of money on their bipods, is that a waste as well? Heck I am sure there are people who buy them just because they are so nicely built, not everyone buys the absolute bare minimum required to do the job, does that make everyone with power windows a sucker?

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Are they as rugged as the Harris? I have a Harris and versapod bipod I like the way the versa pod feels when shooting, but I got a rifle now with a piccatinny rail so I need to get a new bipod for it or another adapter. The atlas looks very nice, andounts to a piccatinny rail.

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I bought the Atlas to use with an AI spigot attachment. Very neat way to attach a bipod. The Atlas is extreamly well designed and built but as mentioned above is slower to deploy than a Harris. The Atlas is much more ridgid and has many more possible positions than the Harrris. I would be willing to bet that if you did a torture test the Atlas would be working fine after the Harris was in pieces. I did find that for me, with the rubber feet the Atlas seemed to jump quite a bit from a solid bench but the claw feet were more stable. I would purchase another for some uses, but not for 3 gun. As with many things in shooting, you can go with the cheap stuff and it will work, sort of, but I find that quality products give me more pleasure in the long run, and thats why I shoot, for pleasure.

Doug

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I like mine well enough, but deploying it at speed is not a strong point. The standard height will be fine unless you are shooting at a target that is a lot higher than you. This isn't an issue due to how most ranges are designed, but if you find yourself hunting in the mountains it may come up. The Harris is 90% of the bipod for half the price, but that seems how most things are.

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I have a number of the Harris and Atlas bipods. The Atlas bipod has a number of distinct advantages to long range tactical shooting.

1. Makes it easier to load the bipod.

2. It swivels and has a tention adjustment on the swivel, makes it easier to track moving targets.

3. Legs can not forward and back, this has many advantages. Such as reducing the height below the minmum retractable movement on the legs. When I am shooting off a fence I put one leg forward and one leg to the back which give a very stable shooting position, etc.

4. The unit cants from the swivel position so it is easy to keep your scope vertical.

5. It is built extremely well, I actually broke the leg off of a Harris bipod on one of my heavier rifles.

I use the Harris bipods on my 223 AR platforms. I use the Atlas on my AR10 platform and on my bolt guns.

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I use the Harris bipods on my 223 AR platforms. I use the Atlas on my AR10 platform and on my bolt guns.

That's how I run things also!

Atlas bipods are fantastic! :wub:

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I have a number of the Harris and Atlas bipods. The Atlas bipod has a number of distinct advantages to long range tactical shooting.

1. Makes it easier to load the bipod.

2. It swivels and has a tention adjustment on the swivel, makes it easier to track moving targets.

3. Legs can not forward and back, this has many advantages. Such as reducing the height below the minmum retractable movement on the legs. When I am shooting off a fence I put one leg forward and one leg to the back which give a very stable shooting position, etc.

4. The unit cants from the swivel position so it is easy to keep your scope vertical.

5. It is built extremely well, I actually broke the leg off of a Harris bipod on one of my heavier rifles.

I use the Harris bipods on my 223 AR platforms. I use the Atlas on my AR10 platform and on my bolt guns.

Couldn't have said it better!

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I shot a Harris for a little more than two years before switching to the Atlas. The Atlas is worth every penny I paid for it. Not as quick to open as the Harris but more versatile.

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I shot a Harris and switched to the Atlas. The thing I didn't like about the atlas is you cant get them to snap down to parallel quickly. I like the fact that the harris was quicker to use. I switched back to the harris swivel with pod loc. Call me crazy but I just like it better and I know I am in the minority of those that have used both.

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I'm using a stock Atlas with the AI spigot on my AI AW .308 and greatly prefer it to the Harris. The big feature for me is the play in the legs of the Atlas. I can get behind the rifle, scooch forward to pre-load the bipod, and not have the feet move when I fire the rifle due to that play. That makes it much easier to see my hits through the scope, and I've even seen the vapor trails from my rounds on occasion. The lack of play with the legs on the Harris means that the feet will move and disturb your view through the scope unless shot on concrete. Spiked feed might lock the legs in place as well, but I haven't tried them.

It makes no difference on an AR-15 since there's not enough recoil to move the rifle. I can see my hits just fine with the Harris.

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I have used the Atlas now for about 18 months. I second most of what is said. I have used harris and GG&G bipods, but the Atlas reigns supreme with me.

I wanted to add the only thing that changed on my bipods with use is the tighness of the pan/tilt mechanism. It uses a ball in joint (much like your legs and arms use). When you first get your bipod it is very tight, but will loosen quickly with use. I have seem some folks complain about this, but I actually like them once broken in a bit.

+1 on the way this bipod takes a load. When loaded the bipod creates a less than 90 degree angle to the bore. I believe this greatly enhances stability with the 7.62.

The ability to lock the legs in a forward angle is perfect for shooting on a simulated rooftop, or shooting down at targets.

My favorite feature is the "footprint". The atlas is the definition of compact, yet still very strong.

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