Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
humanoid

Practice time at a traditional range worth it?

Recommended Posts

I had some time yesterday but it was raining so I could not go to my normal run and gun berm to practice. Instead I went to a local indoor laned range. I practiced fundamentals and long shots but I was done with that in no time. I ended up burning 200 rounds and I felt guilty about it when I got home. It seems almost as if I would have done better with dry fire exercise.

What is your opinion on practicing at a range with lanes. Is it better to skip it?

Edited by humanoid

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That limits what you can do but there's a few things.

One thing I've done that helped me (or would if I'd practice more) is to come from the low ready and fire a controlled pair - that helps with my second shot. The other is to aim at another target, then quickly shift my aim to my target and fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but I was done with that in no time. I ended up burning 200 rounds and I felt guilty about it when I got home.

That's one reason I shoot bullseye - you can actually shoot ~300 rounds in a little over an hour...

Nothing wrong with shooting groups - if things are too easy, put the targets out farther...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hang two targaets at my indoor range on the same carrier. I do different draws fire two on each reload and two on each again. Like we did in Phil Strader's class I only tape non A hits. I do not live fire practice often though. Almost all dry fire using Steve's book and a few other drills I've picked up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even when it is lane shooting, there's plenty you can work on. Livefire gives you (immediate (and satisfying)) feedback.

Dot Torture. Too easy, send the target back 2 yards.

Work transitions.

Work transitions between big easy targets and small challenging targets (and back again).

Work mirror-image shooting.

Work one-handed.

Work reloads (slide lock and "tactical").

Take a look at the Drills for the Public Range article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Dot torture is a good idea. I will check out the other drills as well!!!

I have recently found that I am not as good as I would like to be at 20 yard shots so I will practice that on the days that I can only get to a lane.

Thanks

Hugh

Edited by humanoid

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I went practicing I played with a locked popper at 50y, was fun and usefull, beiing able to knock off the popper à 50y mean I should be able to do so nearer. And being able to reach a popper mean roughly I'm ok for A/C on a paper.

Practicing is the only way to get better. period.

And yes IPSC is cool, but taking my good ol 357 mag and shoot only for the fun of shooting is good too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I like to do at traditional range is sight in a gun, other than that it's not worth my time, I'd rather dry fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sighting in is about the only use I have for a traditional range. I know there are other things I could work on there, but the overall atmosphere and the restrictions are distasteful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your "Traditional Range" does not allow drawing from the holster there are still many things that you can practice from a gun handling perspective. You could practice your table starts both loaded and unloaded. Practice performing reloads off of the bench. Practice gun manipulation skills such as transitioning from freestyle to strong hand or freestyle to weak hand. Even though you only have 1 target carrier to work with you can still put multiple targets on the single target carrier. I like to use the 1/3 and 2/3 size USPSA targets that are made for air soft. You can setup really challenging shooting arrays while using these targets and easily get 2 - 3 of them on the same target carrier. Bring your shot timer in there and make mini stages so you have to shoot under a time pressure.

I use a local indoor public range for live fire practice. They allow us to draw from the holster and perform speed reloads. The only thing that they don't allow is starting in any position other than facing straight down range. But even with that limitation there are endless drills that I can shoot and still get good practice out of it. I usually limit these practice sessions to only 100 rounds. Doing this makes me earn each shot verses blasting away and burning up 300 - 400 rounds without really learning much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are some great tips. Being new to handguns I am still looking for areas other than my indoor range to shoot. Still learning so the more I read from you guys the better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...