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On Paying Attention

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Brian, when you are visualizing where do you direct your attention? Are you playing a past recording obscuring the present or is it like a dream where you are in control of what you want to happen?

My draw speed improves when I distract myself by directing attention to my weak hand. It's like the conscious mind is a guard dog that you need to distract with a mental tennis ball so you can get past it.

http://www.brianenos...if#entry1204530

When I first started shooting at 50 yards I remember thinking how hard it is, it's so far away. I said something to Toolguy about it and he said let's go shoot Silhouette. We shot Field Pistol and started at 25 and ended up shooting at 100 yrds. After that the targets didn't seem easy or difficult, near or far, just larger or smaller.

I googled "subconscious, and the words on wikipedia pretty much summed up how I feel about the use of the word subconscious.

I like Brian's Wikipedia reference and especially the snippet from it

"references to the 'subconscious' as an agency may credit it with various abilities and powers that exceed those possessed by consciousness: the 'subconscious' may apparently remember, perceive and determine things beyond the reach or control of the conscious mind."

I think the concept of the subconscious being a separate "agent" from the conscious is very useful in all sports but really in IPSC.

Assign some tasks to the conscious agent and offload as much to the subconscious as possible. The subconscious is much faster in all sports than the conscious.

That's why if you are good enough at any sports skill, you can do it faster if you don't "think" about it (read, use the slower conscious mind).

It's tricky concept to train separate "agent" that you cannot directly communicate with but Brian's concept of "attention" is one of best ways I know to tame the beast. Also pictures and visualizing seem to indirectly communicate with this agent as well.

Another concept that ties well into this is that the subconscious agent can be "hijacked" by other stuff like emotions, match stress, weather, difficult memory stages, physical condition, diet and a zillion other factors.

To a certain degree the "user" or conscious mind can resist these subconscious "hijackers" by force of will (will power) which is paradoxically a conscious effort (or is it really only conscious?)

Edited by toothguy

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Brian, when you are visualizing where do you direct your attention?

Visualizing, in preparation for what, specifically?

Often, I'd visualize just exactly what I want to happen, withing thinking about any part of my body.

be

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Brian, when you are visualizing where do you direct your attention?

Visualizing, in preparation for what, specifically?

Often, I'd visualize just exactly what I want to happen, withing thinking about any part of my body.

be

Appendix B: Revolver shooting, Thoughts on Bianchi. You have a separate focus for the four sections of the match. The focus descriptions that you write about are visual "it's just a total observation process". I'm comparing that to "The Set" where it's a feeling that you are reproducing. It seems that when I try to visualize my attention goes to the feel more so than the visual. It almost seems that if I get the feel right everything else will fall into place.

I guess my question is are you seeing what you want to happen or are you feeling what you want to happen and the visual is a part of that feeling?

Edited by toothguy

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It seems that when I try to visualize my attention goes to the feel more so than the visual. It almost seems that if I get the feel right everything else will fall into place.

I guess my question is are you seeing what you want to happen or are you feeling what you want to happen and the visual is a part of that feeling?

Yes - that's it. It's a total body feeling though, as opposed to being focused on any specific part of the body.

When Practical Shooting, Beyond Fundamentals was published, I had not formulated "The Set" topic at that point.

:D

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"The Set" is my favorite post, because personally I need to translate the words of what I'm suppose to do into a feel. I have always learned better watching then doing to try to establish a feel. When I first read your book I had no experience to relate to. I understood the words but they don't have the same meaning as they do now.

From your book: "I look at the very center of the target. My eye is aware of the dot's relationship to the center of the target and is trying to keep the dot there--steering the dot. I'm visually aware of the dot's relationship to the target and I'm also mentally aware of the way my finger is pulling the trigger to influence wherever the dot is. I'm not actually focused on the trigger control or on the dot; I'm focused on the relationship between the trigger pull and the placement of the dot---it's just a total observation process."

I remember reading that over and over trying to understand it. but now when I read it, I can feel it. Maybe it's time to read the book again. :)

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"The Set" is my favorite post, because personally I need to translate the words of what I'm suppose to do into a feel.

+1 !!! :cheers:

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Can someone provide the link to where "The set" is talked about

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My biggest screw ups always come from not reading the stage instructions.  Dumb I know

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10 hours ago, NumberTwo said:

My biggest screw ups always come from not reading the stage instructions. =

 

Lot of my biggest screw ups is from the MD NOT providing written stage instructions.     ?

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